History DiscWorld / WitchesAbroad

8th Apr '16 7:09:18 PM TimG5
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* EatingTheEnemy: One unfortunate vampire in bat form is devoured by Greebo the tomcat before he can feed on the protagonists.
-->''"Vampires have risen from the dead, the grave and the crypt, but have never managed it from the cat."''
23rd Mar '16 11:31:22 AM LongLiveHumour
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** The early part of the witches' journey is a parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and derivative works, with the 'invisible dwarf runes' on the door in the mountains ("I can't see 'em." "That's how you know you've got your money's worth, with invisible runes.") and the boat passage on the underground river -- at one point a slimy creature on a raft appears and says "'Ullo... it'sss my birthday..." The "invisible runes" part even includes "She struck the door and [[SpeakFriendAndEnter spake thusly]]: "Open up, you little sods!"

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** The early part of the witches' journey is a parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and derivative works, with the 'invisible dwarf runes' on the door in the mountains ("I can't see 'em." "That's how you know you've got your money's worth, with invisible runes.") and the boat passage on the underground river -- at one point a slimy creature on a raft appears and says "'Ullo... it'sss my birthday..." The "invisible runes" part even includes "She struck the door and [[SpeakFriendAndEnter spake thusly]]: "Open up, you little sods!"sods!" We also get dwarf bread, the Discworld equivalent to elven Lembas: one bite will keep you going for days, because suddenly there's any number of things you'd rather eat. "Your boots, for example. Mountains. Raw sheep. Your own foot."
12th Feb '16 9:34:44 AM Discar
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* Witches are said to guard the edges, and they frequently tell each other stories about other witches to keep an eye on each other. In ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', the Lancre witches have to fight Granny Weatherwax's twin sister, Lily, with fairy tale stories in Genua. The stories want to be told, whatever the effects on their players. Lily is arranging the city of Genua along the lines of these stories. The toymaker will be a jolly, red-faced man who whistles while he works ''if he knows what's good for him''. The servant girl will marry the prince, with the help of her fairy godmother, whoever has to get hurt along the way. Since Granny and Lily are twins, one ''must'' be the "evil" twin because "that's how the stories go".
12th Feb '16 7:09:50 AM crazysamaritan
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* Witches are said to guard the edges, and they frequently tell each other stories about other witches to keep an eye on each other. In ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', the Lancre witches have to fight Granny Weatherwax's twin sister, Lily, with fairy tale stories in Genua. The stories want to be told, whatever the effects on their players. Lily is arranging the city of Genua along the lines of these stories. The toymaker will be a jolly, red-faced man who whistles while he works ''if he knows what's good for him''. The servant girl will marry the prince, with the help of her fairy godmother, whoever has to get hurt along the way. Since Granny and Lily are twins, one ''must'' be the "evil" twin because "that's how the stories go".



* TwiceToldTale: Many of the jokes don't make sense if you don't know "Literature/{{Cinderella}}". Good thing everyone does, isn't it?
** In a more meta interpretation of the trope, part of the book's theme is the idea that fairytale stories repeat themselves, wear a groove in the world and then subvert reality so that, for example, "it is now actually ''impossible'' for [[YoungestChildWins the third and youngest son of a king to set out on a quest that has claimed his two older brothers, and not succeed]]." Lily's power comes from manipulating the stories to her own ends.
*** [[spoiler: Even when, as in the case of the stories she's using for her main plot, she's actually got at least one of them ''backwards''.]]
** Black Aliss, a famous WickedWitch, was also responsible for the Discworld versions of several fairytales, including Hansel and Gretel and Sleeping Beauty. Some overlap with FracturedFairyTale, because she also turned people into ''gingerbread'' and had a house made of ''frogs''.

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* TwiceToldTale: TwiceToldTale:
**
Many of the jokes don't make sense if you don't know "Literature/{{Cinderella}}"."Literature/{{Cinderella}}" due to the WholePlotReference that Lily is using. Good thing everyone does, isn't it?
** In a more meta interpretation of the trope, part Part of the book's theme is the idea that fairytale stories repeat themselves, wear a groove in the world and then subvert reality so that, for example, "it is now actually ''impossible'' for [[YoungestChildWins the third and youngest son of a king to set out on a quest that has claimed his two older brothers, and not succeed]]." Lily's power comes from manipulating the stories to her own ends.
***
ends. [[spoiler: Even when, as in the case of the stories she's using for her main plot, she's actually got at least one of them ''backwards''.]]
** Black Aliss, a famous WickedWitch, was also responsible for the Discworld versions of several fairytales, including Hansel ''Hansel and Gretel Gretel'' and Sleeping Beauty.''Sleeping Beauty''. Some overlap with FracturedFairyTale, because she also turned people into ''gingerbread'' and had a house made of ''frogs''.



* WrongGenreSavvy: Lilith is this -- she thinks she's the kind fairy godmother who's giving everyone a happy ending, to the point where she invokes happy fairytale endings at sword-point. You'll live happily ever after ''or else''.

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* WrongGenreSavvy: Lilith is this -- she thinks she's the kind fairy godmother who's giving everyone a happy ending, to the point where she invokes happy fairytale endings at sword-point. You'll live happily ever after ''or else''.
5th Dec '15 11:32:33 AM morenohijazo
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* MovingBuildings: Mrs. Gogol's home in the swamp grows four legs and walks around as needed.

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* MovingBuildings: Mrs. Gogol's home in the swamp grows four legs and walks around as needed. It's a reference to Baba Yaga's house on chicken legs, but because it's in a swamp Mrs. Gogol's house has duck legs instead.
29th Nov '15 10:08:53 AM morenohijazo
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* MovingBuildings: Mrs. Gogol's home in the swamp grows four legs and walks around as needed.
15th Nov '15 1:54:10 AM gallium
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* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Mrs Gogol the voodoo witch has a black cockerel called Legba, which she claims to be a dark and terrible spirit. He isn't.
14th Aug '15 5:53:22 AM PaulA
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* ContinuityNod: This isn't the first time [[spoiler: Death]] has received a compliment on the quality of his "mask". In ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' his was at a (different) party when he is summoned by the wizards, and comments that it's going to go downhill at midnight, because:

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* ContinuityNod: ContinuityNod:
** When the witches get locked up by the Duc and Lilith, Nanny remarks that she's an experienced prisoner, referring to the time she was thrown in a dungeon by the Duke and Duchess in ''Discworld/WyrdSisters''.
**
This isn't the first time [[spoiler: Death]] has received a compliment on the quality of his "mask". In ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' his was at a (different) party when he is summoned by the wizards, and comments that it's going to go downhill at midnight, because:



* ShoutOut: The early part of the witches' journey is a parody of ''TheLordOfTheRings'' and derivative works, with the 'invisible dwarf runes' on the door in the mountains ("I can't see 'em." "That's how you know you've got your money's worth, with invisible runes.") and, most notably, the boat passage on the underground river - at one point a slimy creature on a raft appears and says "'Ullo... it'sss my birthday..."
** The "invisible runes" part even includes "She struck the door and [[SpeakFriendAndEnter spake thusly]]: "Open up, you little sods!"
** Mrs. Gogol's hut can move about on duck feet, as a wetlands-adapted variant of Baba Yaga's chicken-legged hut in Russian folklore. (Or the similar dwelling of Sheelba of the Eyeless Face in the [[FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser Lankhmar stories]].)

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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
The early part of the witches' journey is a parody of ''TheLordOfTheRings'' ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and derivative works, with the 'invisible dwarf runes' on the door in the mountains ("I can't see 'em." "That's how you know you've got your money's worth, with invisible runes.") and, most notably, and the boat passage on the underground river - -- at one point a slimy creature on a raft appears and says "'Ullo... it'sss my birthday..."
**
" The "invisible runes" part even includes "She struck the door and [[SpeakFriendAndEnter spake thusly]]: "Open up, you little sods!"
** Mrs. Gogol's hut can move about on duck feet, as a wetlands-adapted variant of Baba Yaga's chicken-legged hut in Russian folklore. (Or the similar dwelling of Sheelba of the Eyeless Face in the [[FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser Lankhmar stories]].)



** Being a ''Discworld'' book, there's plenty of references and {{Shout Out}}s, but especially this one, being a journey across many places and a story about stories. One of the nicer little ones is "They flew on through [[ColossalCave a maze of twisty little canyons, all alike]]."

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** Being a ''Discworld'' book, there's plenty of references and {{Shout Out}}s, but especially this one, being a journey across many places and a story about stories. One of the nicer little ones is "They flew on through [[ColossalCave [[VideoGame/ColossalCave a maze of twisty little canyons, all alike]]."


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* TheTell: Granny absent-mindedly twiddling her little finger in her ear moments before she utterly destroys somebody. First shows up, appropriately enough, in a card game (with Nanny explaining its significance to Magrat), then reappears a few times later, most dramatically during her showdown with Mrs Gogol.
11th Aug '15 5:10:29 AM Azreal
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he 12th Literature/{{Discworld}} novel and the second or third book in the "witches" theme (depending on if you count ''Discworld/EqualRites''). The title is a [[RunningGag pune, or play on words]], on the Shakespearean phrase 'witches abroad' (i.e., out on the prowl in archaic language) whereas here it's used in the modern sense - they're going to a foreign country.

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he The 12th Literature/{{Discworld}} novel and the second or third book in the "witches" theme (depending on if you count ''Discworld/EqualRites''). The title is a [[RunningGag pune, or play on words]], on the Shakespearean phrase 'witches abroad' (i.e., out on the prowl in archaic language) whereas here it's used in the modern sense - they're going to a foreign country.
5th Aug '15 6:04:36 PM PaulA
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* FatalFamilyPhoto: No actual photo, but the same basic idea. When the footmen and coach driver first appear, they're discussing their families, with particular attention to one of them who is just married and still in the first bloom of love. Death follows swiftly.
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