History DeconstructedTrope / LiveActionTV

23rd Jan '16 7:37:30 AM damus2300
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ''Series/{{Nikita}}'' deconstructed TragicKeepsake. Alex kept getting into trouble because her late father's watch gets recognized by her enemies. Later it gets planted with a tracking device but she can't bear to have it destroyed because it's all she has left of her father.
31st Dec '15 4:56:51 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Series/JonathanCreek'' has an episode that deconstructs the ConnectTheDeaths trope. Three women have been murdered, and the police are at a loss to explain how or why. However, [[TheWatson Carla]] twigs to the fact that the women were called Heather, Rose and Iris, and goes on her crime show to share this news with the viewing public, telling them that the killer is symbolically "deflowering women". As it turns out, the first two deaths were done by a psychotic woman that had no discernable motive, and the third was by a police officer who used the first murders to cover up his own crime. That the women had floral names was a complete coincidence, and as Jonathan says at the wrap-up, the fact that Carla shared her bogus theory only resulted in mass panic among women named after a flower (including a woman called Coral, at least until Jonathan assures her that coral is actually an animal). * Several in ''{{Community}}''.
to:
* ''Series/JonathanCreek'' has an episode that deconstructs the ConnectTheDeaths trope. Three women have been murdered, and the police are at a loss to explain how or why. However, [[TheWatson Carla]] twigs to the fact that the women were called Heather, Rose and Iris, and goes on her crime show to share this news with the viewing public, telling them that the killer is symbolically "deflowering women". As it turns out, the first two deaths were done by a psychotic woman that had no discernable discernible motive, and the third was by a police officer who used the first murders to cover up his own crime. That the women had floral names was a complete coincidence, and as Jonathan says at the wrap-up, the fact that Carla shared her bogus theory only resulted in mass panic among women named after a flower (including a woman called Coral, at least until Jonathan assures her that coral is actually an animal). * Several in ''{{Community}}''.''Series/{{Community}}''.
27th Nov '15 2:33:27 PM Zephyr7
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Anytime an untrained bystander attempted to do [[BadassBystander something heroic or resolve the situation]], it either makes things worse or disrupt Team One's efforts to deescalate the situation, such as in "Grounded" where Parker would have been able to talk down the hostage takers if a passenger hand't tried to be a hero.
to:
** Anytime an untrained bystander attempted to do [[BadassBystander something heroic or resolve the situation]], it either makes things worse or disrupt Team One's efforts to deescalate the situation, such as in "Grounded" where Parker would have been able to talk down the hostage takers if a passenger hand't hadn't tried to be a hero.
27th Nov '15 2:30:04 PM Zephyr7
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Anytime an untrained bystander attempted to do [[BadassBystander something heroic or resolve the situation]], it either makes things worse or disrupt Team One's efforts to deescalate the situation, such as in "Grounded" where Parker would have been able to talk down the hostage takers if a passenger hand't tried to be a hero.
27th Nov '15 2:25:10 PM Zephyr7
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In ''Series/{{Flashpoint}}'', Parker and his team generally try to avoid WhyDontYaJustShootHim, even when they get a clear shot of the hostage taker. Because they want to ensure that casualties are miminal to none, which includes the life of the hostage-taker, only using lethal force as a last resort. Not to mention the show deconstructs the general idea that all hostage-takers are crazy, unbalanced criminals. The viewers get a chance to see what lead to the events, which are often because of misunderstandings or an emotional crisis. More than once, the hostage-takers never intended for things to spiral out of their control, which causes them to panic and things get messy, both for them and for the team.
to:
* In ''Series/{{Flashpoint}}'', Parker and his team generally try to avoid WhyDontYaJustShootHim, even when they get a clear shot of the hostage taker. Because they want to ensure that casualties are miminal minimal to none, which includes the life of the hostage-taker, only using lethal force as a last resort. Not to mention the show deconstructs the general idea that all hostage-takers are crazy, unbalanced criminals. The viewers get a chance to see what lead to the events, which are often because of misunderstandings or an emotional crisis. More than once, the hostage-takers never intended for things to spiral out of their control, which causes them to panic and things get messy, both for them and for the team.team. ** BabiesMakeEverythingBetter is taken apart in "Backwards Day" where the frustrations of not having a baby caused the husband to cheat on his wife with an old flame, though he genuinely felt guilty afterwards and remained faithful afterwards. His adultery lead to [[spoiler: the old flame becoming pregnant]]. [[FromBadToWorse Things got worse]]. *** The same trope is deconstructed with [[spoiler: Sam and Jules]] after the first day of finding out [[spoiler: Jules]] was pregnant. They initially decided that everything was fine and no one needed to know. But throughout the episode, both of them were quietly having minor freakouts, such as calling each other to check up on the baby and panicking when one of them was put in a dangerous situation.
19th Nov '15 4:34:40 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
All Grown Up redirects to the Rugrats cartoon
** In their use of Callisto, the show deconstructed ButForMeItWasTuesday. Back in her warlord days, Xena led a raid on a village that involved an accidental fire that killed women and children. Though she felt regret, it didn't exactly keep her up at night. Years later, [[AllGrownUp Callisto turns up]], swearing vengeance for the deaths of her parents and sister in that raid, and confronting Xena with the fact that her past crimes have created a psychopath. It's not until this point that Xena realizes the full consequences of her actions and the fact that she's [[CreateYourOwnVillain unknowingly created her worst enemy]], a woman who doesn't want anything in life but to make Xena suffer. Xena's "Tuesday" ends up costing her dearly, both with her GuiltComplex and in all the chaos that Callisto causes.
to:
** In their use of Callisto, the show deconstructed ButForMeItWasTuesday. Back in her warlord days, Xena led a raid on a village that involved an accidental fire that killed women and children. Though she felt regret, it didn't exactly keep her up at night. Years later, [[AllGrownUp Callisto turns up]], up, swearing vengeance for the deaths of her parents and sister in that raid, and confronting Xena with the fact that her past crimes have created a psychopath. It's not until this point that Xena realizes the full consequences of her actions and the fact that she's [[CreateYourOwnVillain unknowingly created her worst enemy]], a woman who doesn't want anything in life but to make Xena suffer. Xena's "Tuesday" ends up costing her dearly, both with her GuiltComplex and in all the chaos that Callisto causes.
22nd Oct '15 6:52:58 PM damus2300
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Ryan's father in ''Series/{{Wilfred}}'' deconstructed ArchnemesisDad. Ryan and his mother spoke of the man as if he was the devil himself, whose scheming and obsession with control alienated then both. When he finally appears, he is... just a man. [[ParentsAsPeople A deeper flawed man]] who never understood how his good intentions destroyed his family and why everything he did to do right by then kept blowing up by his face.
to:
* Ryan's father in ''Series/{{Wilfred}}'' deconstructed ArchnemesisDad. Ryan and his mother spoke of the man him as if he was the devil himself, whose scheming and obsession with control alienated then both. When he finally appears, he is... just a man. [[ParentsAsPeople A deeper deeply flawed man]] who never understood how his good intentions destroyed his family and why everything he did to do right by then his family kept blowing up by in his face.
16th Oct '15 3:23:09 PM Zephyr7
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' deconstructs CrazyJealousGuy through Ross and Chandler. Ross's irrational jealousy leads to his and Rachel's breakup. When Chandler becomes jealous of Kathy's co-star, it eventually drives her to sleep with said co-star.
4th Oct '15 4:35:12 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Mitchell from ''Series/BeingHuman'' is a deconstruction of the FriendlyNeighbourhoodVampire. Blood as an addiction isn't a new metaphor, but consider how difficult it is for real people with real addiction to go a lifetime without falling off the wagon. For Mitchell, losing control means killing people, ''lots'' of people, and because he's immortal, it's inevitable that he'll fall off eventually. It happens at the end of series 2 and when his friends find out, they can't forgive Mitchell, even though he's genuinely remorseful.
to:
* Mitchell from ''Series/BeingHuman'' ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}'' is a deconstruction of the FriendlyNeighbourhoodVampire. Blood as an addiction isn't a new metaphor, but consider how difficult it is for real people with real addiction to go a lifetime without falling off the wagon. For Mitchell, losing control means killing people, ''lots'' of people, and because he's immortal, it's inevitable that he'll fall off eventually. It happens at the end of series 2 and when his friends find out, they can't forgive Mitchell, even though he's genuinely remorseful.
19th Sep '15 1:51:19 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' deconstructed {{Heroic Sacrifice}}s with Dean's "Deal With The Devil" storyline. He knows it was selfish and only did it because he should have stayed dead, feels like he's fucked up so much that he deserves eternal torture, he can't be without his brother and because John told him to look after Sam at all costs. For his part, Sam thinks it was self-righteous, hypocritical, suicidal and extremely selfish. As for the others -- Bobby ''finally'' realizes how broken Dean was and how much he hates himself, both the Crossroad Demons call it needy and Azazel knows it was self-destructive, pathetic and self-loathing. So Heroic Sacrifices? Not so noble after all -- more like selfish, pathetic, destructive and so very suicidal.
to:
** ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' It deconstructed {{Heroic Sacrifice}}s with Dean's "Deal With The Devil" storyline. He knows it was selfish and only did it because he should have stayed dead, feels like he's fucked up so much that he deserves eternal torture, he can't be without his brother and because John told him to look after Sam at all costs. For his part, Sam thinks it was self-righteous, hypocritical, suicidal and extremely selfish. As for the others -- Bobby ''finally'' realizes how broken Dean was and how much he hates himself, both the Crossroad Demons call it needy and Azazel knows it was self-destructive, pathetic and self-loathing. So Heroic Sacrifices? Not so noble after all -- more like selfish, pathetic, destructive and so very suicidal.

* Jasmine in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' could be considered a deconstructed MarySue; she's beautiful, her mother is in a coma, and from her first appearance, she completely [[SpotlightStealingSquad steals the spotlight]] from the main cast, who are instantly trying to help her accomplish her goals, while constantly talking about how wonderful she is. (Because they're {{Brainwashed}}!) ** ''Angel'' also deconstructs TheBigGuy. Charles Gunn resents being thought of as little more than "the muscle," and so make a (basically literal) DealWithTheDevil to gain intricate knowledge of the law, human and demon alike. To maintain this new skill, Gunn makes a second deal that [[spoiler:ends up killing someone he loved]]. He doesn't even realize that his upgrade has actually made him TheBigGuy version of a lawyer. * Season 6 episode of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' "Dead Things", consciously deconstructs the trope of MindControl by following it through to its unsettling conclusions. Led by [[StalkerWithACrush Warren]], the geeky Trio use a device to hypnotize Warren's ex-girlfriend into doing their bidding, even having her dressed up in a [[FetishFuel French maid's outfit]]. Jonathan and Andrew even giggle childishly about how cool the situation is ... until Warren takes his ex into another room and orders her to give him oral sex. She comes out of the trance, is utterly [[{{Squick}} squicked]] by what the Trio are doing and points out that it's ''rape''. [[spoiler: She is then killed by Warren in her attempt to escape the basement,]] and the Trio are sobered out of ever using their MindControl device again.
to:
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': ** Jasmine in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' could be considered is a deconstructed MarySue; she's beautiful, her mother is in a coma, and from her first appearance, she completely [[SpotlightStealingSquad steals the spotlight]] from the main cast, who are instantly trying to help her accomplish her goals, while constantly talking about how wonderful she is. (Because they're {{Brainwashed}}!) ** ''Angel'' also deconstructs TheBigGuy. Charles Gunn resents being thought of as little more than "the muscle," and so make a (basically literal) DealWithTheDevil to gain intricate knowledge of the law, human and demon alike. To maintain this new skill, Gunn makes a second deal that [[spoiler:ends up killing someone he loved]]. He doesn't even realize that his upgrade has actually made him TheBigGuy version of a lawyer. * ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': ** Season 6 episode of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' "Dead Things", Things" consciously deconstructs the trope of MindControl by following it through to its unsettling conclusions. Led by [[StalkerWithACrush Warren]], the geeky Trio use a device to hypnotize Warren's ex-girlfriend into doing their bidding, even having her dressed up in a [[FetishFuel French maid's outfit]]. Jonathan and Andrew even giggle childishly about how cool the situation is ... until Warren takes his ex into another room and orders her to give him oral sex. She comes out of the trance, is utterly [[{{Squick}} squicked]] by what the Trio are doing and points out that it's ''rape''. [[spoiler: She is then killed by Warren in her attempt to escape the basement,]] and the Trio are sobered out of ever using their MindControl device again.

* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' deconstructs RunawayBride and how badly it affected Ted, who was trying to make everyone happy and especially the bride. He was left with serious emotional baggage that affected future relationships, which is not helped at all when that story is depicted in the [[ShowWithinAShow fictional movie]] ''Film/TheWeddingBride'' that plays him as a more traditional jerk who doesn't deserve the girl he is marrying.
to:
* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': ** It deconstructs RunawayBride and how badly it affected Ted, who was trying to make everyone happy and especially the bride. He was left with serious emotional baggage that affected future relationships, which is not helped at all when that story is depicted in the [[ShowWithinAShow fictional movie]] ''Film/TheWeddingBride'' that plays him as a more traditional jerk who doesn't deserve the girl he is marrying.

* Gabrielle from XenaWarriorPrincess deconstructs WideEyedIdealist since her unbending morals and naivete cause her to commit [[NiceJobBreakingItHero rash though well intentioned actions]].
to:
* ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'': ** Gabrielle from XenaWarriorPrincess deconstructs WideEyedIdealist since her unbending morals and naivete cause her to commit [[NiceJobBreakingItHero rash though well intentioned actions]].

* ''[[Series/{{Tosh0}} Tosh.0]]'' deconstructed TooSoon in a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment. During a video breakdown Tosh makes a joke that a guy falling two feet off a roof "Flailed like Saddam at the end of a noose." The audience is shocked by this joke until Tosh responds by saying, "Is it too soon for Saddam jokes? ...Do you guys miss Saddam?" * ''Series/ICarly'' deconstructed EpicFail in the episodes ''iChristmas'' and ''iGot A Hot Room''. Spencer has an innate ability to cause things he creates or even ''touches'' to catch on fire. Normally they burst into flames and Spencer puts the fire out, like he did to a drum kit and a reception desk bell. In ''iChristmas'' he destroys all of their Christmas presents with his metal tree, and in ''iGot A Hot Room'' his lamp made of gummy bears causes Carly's room to be completely gutted by fire.
to:
* ''[[Series/{{Tosh0}} Tosh.0]]'' ''Series/{{Tosh 0}}'' deconstructed TooSoon in a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment. During a video breakdown Tosh makes a joke that a guy falling two feet off a roof "Flailed like Saddam at the end of a noose." The audience is shocked by this joke until Tosh responds by saying, "Is it too soon for Saddam jokes? ...Do you guys miss Saddam?" * ''Series/ICarly'' ''Series/ICarly'': ** It deconstructed EpicFail in the episodes ''iChristmas'' "iChristmas" and ''iGot "iGot A Hot Room''.Room". Spencer has an innate ability to cause things he creates or even ''touches'' to catch on fire. Normally they burst into flames and Spencer puts the fire out, like he did to a drum kit and a reception desk bell. In ''iChristmas'' "iChristmas" he destroys all of their Christmas presents with his metal tree, and in ''iGot "iGot A Hot Room'' Room" his lamp made of gummy bears causes Carly's room to be completely gutted by fire.

* ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'' deconstructs the old classic Kamen Rider trope of having good monsters. For a while, the Kamen Rider Franchise had quite the number of monsters who become good guys, or at least be neutral with varying degrees of good, particularly in the Heisei era, where the monsters in most cases were either human once or took the guise of a human. Kamen Rider Wizard went both ways with that, as Phantoms ''were'' human, but were just essentially an inner demon ripping apart and taking control of their human host, called Gates. However, the show wags at the audience with the idea that not all Phantoms are evil, much like the previous shows. However, every time they did, they point out just how absurd that is when the Phantom's personality almost ''counterbalances'' the Gate's personality, as the Phantom uses the memories and feelings of their Gate and uses it to their advantage. In two cases, the Phantom managed to convince their victim that there's good in them... [[MoralEventHorizon only to kick them to the ground and dash any hopes of that]]. There ''is'' a case where a Phantom believes he's still human... [[spoiler:And he ''is'', but only because he was so evil to begin with that he pretty much ''became'' a Phantom as opposed to having a Phantom rip him apart]]. It's {{reconstructed}} with Haruto's Phantom, Dragon. Even if Dragon is a petty dick who only wants Haruto to fall to despair, he's somewhat surprised when Haruto begs him to lend some power and that he gives him hope. Eventually, he warms up to Haruto [[spoiler:and when he gets killed, revives as a being of pure hope, [[DeathEqualsRedemption ready to give Haruto all the hope he can muster]]]].
to:
* ''Franchise/KamenRider'': ** ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'' deconstructs the old classic Kamen Rider trope of having good monsters. For a while, the Kamen Rider Franchise had quite the number of monsters who become good guys, or at least be neutral with varying degrees of good, particularly in the Heisei era, where the monsters in most cases were either human once or took the guise of a human. Kamen Rider Wizard went both ways with that, as Phantoms ''were'' human, but were just essentially an inner demon ripping apart and taking control of their human host, called Gates. However, the show wags at the audience with the idea that not all Phantoms are evil, much like the previous shows. However, every time they did, they point out just how absurd that is when the Phantom's personality almost ''counterbalances'' the Gate's personality, as the Phantom uses the memories and feelings of their Gate and uses it to their advantage. In two cases, the Phantom managed to convince their victim that there's good in them... [[MoralEventHorizon only to kick them to the ground and dash any hopes of that]]. There ''is'' a case where a Phantom believes he's still human... [[spoiler:And he ''is'', but only because he was so evil to begin with that he pretty much ''became'' a Phantom as opposed to having a Phantom rip him apart]]. It's {{reconstructed}} with Haruto's Phantom, Dragon. Even if Dragon is a petty dick who only wants Haruto to fall to despair, he's somewhat surprised when Haruto begs him to lend some power and that he gives him hope. Eventually, he warms up to Haruto [[spoiler:and when he gets killed, revives as a being of pure hope, [[DeathEqualsRedemption ready to give Haruto all the hope he can muster]]]].

* Ryan's father in ''Series/{{Wilfred}}'' deconstructed ArchnemesisDad. Ryan and his mother spoke of the man as if he was the devil himself, whose scheming and obsession with control alienated then both. When he finally appears, he is... just a man. [[ParentsAsPeople A deeper flawed man]] who never understood how his good intentions destroyed his family and why everything he did to do right by then kept blowing up by his face.
to:
* Ryan's father in ''Series/{{Wilfred}}'' deconstructed ArchnemesisDad. Ryan and his mother spoke of the man as if he was the devil himself, whose scheming and obsession with control alienated then both. When he finally appears, he is... just a man. [[ParentsAsPeople A deeper flawed man]] who never understood how his good intentions destroyed his family and why everything he did to do right by then kept blowing up by his face.face. ----
This list shows the last 10 events of 79. Show all.