History DeaderThanDisco / VideoGames

29th May '16 6:25:19 PM rjd1922
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RDI Video Systems was a corporation that quickly went from rags to riches in the early-to-mid 80s thanks to them finding a huge market for laserdisc based arcade games, with games like ''VideoGame/DragonsLair''. Creator/DonBluth, in news footage extolling said game, said in effect "Hollywood is now getting into the interactive business, with writers and actors involved with gaming." With the huge success they had it was obvious that they would cement their legacy by trying to have a hand in the (then dead) console market and they created the RDI Halcyon game console, noted for being more advanced than even the most advanced high-end PC's of its time (having features such as voice-activation and fluid animation of Disney level quality, which PC gamers of the time could only dream of) and for being hand-made. The price for one console was 2500$ (Adjusted for inflation it is 4952$. It is pretty much impossible to find a PC that costs more money.) and only 2 games were made for it. It only sold 13 units, making it the lowest selling video game console of all time and RDI went bankrupt after this.
* DigitizedSprites (sprites made up of scanned images rather than bitmaps) enjoyed a day in the limelight from about 1992[[note]]beginning, more-or-less with VideoGame/MortalKombat[[/note]] to 1996 but are now happily forgotten, being only used in the odd handheld game, and even that is exceedingly rare now. Pre-rendered sprites (sprites made up of scanned images produced by external 3D rendering software), especially, are largely a thing of the past now. In retrospect, what was once lauded as the new cutting edge just looks cheap and ugly 90% of the time, especially with the current generation using consoles capable of far better graphics than could have been pre-rendered at the time[[note]]Not helping matters is that, in 1994, many seriously believed that the graphics in VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry (the game that popularized this trend) were generated in real time through the [=SNES's=] graphics hardware but, by the time the third game was released, everybody had caught on to how the graphics were ''really'' done[[/note]]. DVD storage limits also preclude high definition FMV to match the HD capabilities of today's consoles.\\

to:

* RDI Video Systems was a corporation that quickly went from rags to riches in the early-to-mid 80s thanks to them finding a huge market for laserdisc based arcade games, with games like ''VideoGame/DragonsLair''. Creator/DonBluth, in news footage extolling said game, said in effect "Hollywood is now getting into the interactive business, with writers and actors involved with gaming." With the huge success they had it was obvious that they would cement their legacy by trying to have a hand in the (then dead) console market and they created the RDI Halcyon game console, noted for being more advanced than even the most advanced high-end PC's of its time (having features such as voice-activation and fluid animation of Disney level quality, which PC gamers of the time could only dream of) and for being hand-made. The price for one console was 2500$ $2500 (Adjusted for inflation it is 4952$.$4952. It is pretty much impossible to find a PC that costs more money.) and only 2 two games were made for it. It only sold 13 units, making it the lowest selling video game console of all time and RDI went bankrupt after this.
* DigitizedSprites (sprites made up of scanned images rather than bitmaps) enjoyed a day in the limelight from about 1992[[note]]beginning, more-or-less with VideoGame/MortalKombat[[/note]] ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''[[/note]] to 1996 but are now happily forgotten, being only used in the odd handheld game, and even that is exceedingly rare now. Pre-rendered sprites (sprites made up of scanned images produced by external 3D rendering software), especially, are largely a thing of the past now. In retrospect, what was once lauded as the new cutting edge just looks cheap and ugly 90% of the time, especially with the current generation using consoles capable of far better graphics than could have been pre-rendered at the time[[note]]Not helping matters is that, in 1994, many seriously believed that the graphics in VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' (the game that popularized this trend) were generated in real time through the [=SNES's=] graphics hardware but, by the time the third game was released, everybody had caught on to how the graphics were ''really'' done[[/note]]. DVD storage limits also preclude high definition FMV to match the HD capabilities of today's consoles.\\
28th May '16 9:01:05 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [=J2E's=] FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' was once highly regarded, praised for a lack of {{Bowdlerization}} and not having the initial localization's lowered difficulty. However, as people got wiser, a translated version of the original script became easier to get, and, perhaps more to the point, [[http://legendsoflocalization.com/reader-feedback-ffivs-fan-translation/ Legends of Localization]] ripped it apart, its flaws have become obvious. The script has been criticized for [[BlindIdiotTranslation questionable translations]], [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece ill-fitting pop culture references,]] a general sense of unprofessionalism, stealing lines from the original SNES localization, and many supposedly {{Bowdlerized}} lines actually being [[SpiceUpTheSubtitles made up by J2E,]] it came to be widely mocked and considered to be everything wrong with [[FanTranslation Fan Translations.]] In addition, [[http://www.romhacking.net/hacks/2337/ Final Fantasy IV: Namingway Edition]] seeks to restore the original version from the US version, precisely ''because'' of the FanTranslation being so poor. (For what it's worth, the aforementioned Legends of Localization still considers it better than the PlayStation 1 script.)

to:

* [=J2E's=] FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' was once highly regarded, praised for a lack of {{Bowdlerization}} and not having the initial localization's lowered difficulty. However, as people got wiser, a translated version of the original script became easier to get, and, perhaps more to the point, [[http://legendsoflocalization.com/reader-feedback-ffivs-fan-translation/ Legends of Localization]] ripped it apart, its flaws have become obvious. The script has been criticized for [[BlindIdiotTranslation questionable translations]], [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece ill-fitting pop culture references,]] a general sense of unprofessionalism, stealing lines from the original SNES localization, and many supposedly {{Bowdlerized}} lines actually being [[SpiceUpTheSubtitles made up by J2E,]] it came to be widely mocked and considered to be everything wrong with [[FanTranslation Fan Translations.]] In addition, [[http://www.romhacking.net/hacks/2337/ Final Fantasy IV: Namingway Edition]] seeks to restore the original version from the US version, precisely ''because'' of the FanTranslation being so poor. (For what it's worth, the aforementioned Legends of Localization still considers it better than the PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation 1 script.)
27th May '16 5:10:27 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Virtual Reality. In the early to mid-1990s, this was believed to be the future of video games. However, a combination of the high costs of VR headsets, the failure of Nintendo's UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and the rise in popularity of multiplayer gaming (the social aspect of which was difficult to successfully integrate into a VR setting) significantly decreased mainstream interest in the idea. By about 1998, virtual reality was more-or-less forgotten in video games, and is used mainly for scientific purposes (such as medical research) and TotallyRadical jokes about TheNineties. Time will tell if the Oculus Rift system is able to revive VR; it has received a lot of hype from its Website/{{Kickstarter}} campaign and its modern technology, and has received endorsements from the likes of [[Creator/IdSoftware John D. Carmack]] (who is currently the company's Chief Technology Officer), [[Creator/EpicGames Cliff Bleszinsky]], and [[Creator/ValveSoftware Gabe Newell]]. Though the Rift has finally come out, it's launch was lukewarm at best and currently most of the attention Oculus gets is negative. The worst being Oculus attempting to lock down it's games(Despite Palmer Lucky outright stating months ago that he would do no such thing) with DRM to prevent them from being played on the HTC Vive after someone made a program allowing people to do that. The DRM backfired massively, [[EpicFail as it actually made it possible for people to pirate games from the Rift outright]].
27th May '16 5:07:16 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Extreme Sports games appeared to be this after ''VideoGame/TonyHawkRide'' flopped in 2009. They appear to be picking up a second wind, with such games as 2012's ''VideoGame/{{SSX}}'' and ''VideoGame/TonyHawksProSkater HD'' garnering positive reviews and strong sales.
* NintendoHard because of limited lives and limited chances in earning more. The concept of lives and continues is rarely practiced today due to developers favoring the use of checkpoints and due to Game Overs being a {{Classic Video Game Screw You|s}}. Even the concept of a Game Over has all but been forgotten; it's generally easier and more convenient for the player to suffer a small penalty for failure and simply reload his last save/checkpoint instead of going through a game over sequence.
27th May '16 12:06:53 AM vexer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Extreme Sports games appeared to be this after ''VideoGame/TonyHawkRide'' flopped in 2009. They appear to be picking up a second wind, with such games as 2012's ''VideoGame/{{SSX}}'' and ''VideoGame/TonyHawksProSkater HD'' garnering positive reviews and strong sales, but it's too soon to tell whether it will be a lasting trend.
* Lives and continues were also a common element in the early days of video games and most games were NintendoHard because of limited lives and limited chances in earning more. The concept of lives and continues is rarely practiced today due to developers favoring the use of checkpoints and due to Game Overs being a {{Classic Video Game Screw You|s}}. Even the concept of a Game Over has all but been forgotten; it's generally easier and more convenient for the player to suffer a small penalty for failure and simply reload his last save/checkpoint instead of going through a game over sequence.

to:

* Extreme Sports games appeared to be this after ''VideoGame/TonyHawkRide'' flopped in 2009. They appear to be picking up a second wind, with such games as 2012's ''VideoGame/{{SSX}}'' and ''VideoGame/TonyHawksProSkater HD'' garnering positive reviews and strong sales, but it's too soon to tell whether it will be a lasting trend.
* Lives and continues were also a common element in the early days of video games and most games were NintendoHard
sales.
*NintendoHard
because of limited lives and limited chances in earning more. The concept of lives and continues is rarely practiced today due to developers favoring the use of checkpoints and due to Game Overs being a {{Classic Video Game Screw You|s}}. Even the concept of a Game Over has all but been forgotten; it's generally easier and more convenient for the player to suffer a small penalty for failure and simply reload his last save/checkpoint instead of going through a game over sequence.



Unfortunately, once the awe over the [=CD-ROM=] format died down and it came time to actually ''play'' the Sega CD, gamers found a weak game library that made very poor use of the [=CD=] format. Many of its games were little more than cheaply made [[FullMotionVideo FMV schlockfests]] (see the corresponding entry above for further details), while those that weren't were usually just Genesis games with [=CD=] soundtracks and [=FMV=] cutscenes. What's more, being an add-on for the Genesis, the Sega CD fell victim to its parent system's technological shortcomings: load times were maddening, and the add-on's use of the Genesis's measly 64 color palette meant that the much touted [=FMV=] clips were blurry, grainy messes that couldn't even be displayed in full screen. Combined with the add-on's notoriously high price point (it cost almost as much as ''two Genesis systems'') and the immediate release of technologically superior CD-based systems like the Panasonic [=3DO=], the Sega CD was soon relegated to the video game dustbin, being officially discontinued less than four years after release and now being seen as a prime example of why add-ons often crash and burn.

to:

Unfortunately, once the awe over the [=CD-ROM=] format died down and it came time to actually ''play'' the Sega CD, gamers found a weak game library that made very poor use of the [=CD=] format. Many of its games were little more than cheaply made [[FullMotionVideo FMV schlockfests]] games]] (see the corresponding entry above for further details), while those that weren't were usually just Genesis games with [=CD=] soundtracks and [=FMV=] cutscenes. What's more, being an add-on for the Genesis, the Sega CD fell victim to its parent system's technological shortcomings: load times were maddening, and the add-on's use of the Genesis's measly 64 color palette meant that the much touted [=FMV=] clips were blurry, grainy messes that couldn't even be displayed in full screen. Combined with the add-on's notoriously high price point (it cost almost as much as ''two Genesis systems'') and the immediate release of technologically superior CD-based systems like the Panasonic [=3DO=], the Sega CD was soon relegated to the video game dustbin, being officially discontinued less than four years after release and now being seen as a prime example of why add-ons often crash and burn.
26th May '16 11:59:21 PM vexer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Virtual Reality. In the early to mid-1990s, this was believed to be the future of video games. However, a combination of the high costs of VR headsets, the failure of Nintendo's UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and the rise in popularity of multiplayer gaming (the social aspect of which was difficult to successfully integrate into a VR setting) significantly decreased mainstream interest in the idea. By about 1998, virtual reality was more-or-less forgotten in video games, and is used mainly for scientific purposes (such as medical research) and TotallyRadical jokes about TheNineties. Time will tell if the Oculus Rift system is able to revive VR; it has received a lot of hype from its Website/{{Kickstarter}} campaign and its modern technology, and has received endorsements from the likes of [[Creator/IdSoftware John D. Carmack]] (who is currently the company's Chief Technology Officer), [[Creator/EpicGames Cliff Bleszinsky]], and [[Creator/ValveSoftware Gabe Newell]]. Though the Rift has finally come out, it's launch was lukewarm at best and currently most of the attention Oculus gets is negative. The worst being Oculus attempting to lock down it's games(Despite Palmer Lucky outright stating months ago that he would do no such thing) with DRM to prevent them from being played on the HTC Vive after someone made a program allowing people to do that. The DRM backfired massively, [[as it actually made it possible for people to pirate games from the Rift outright EpicFail]].

to:

* Virtual Reality. In the early to mid-1990s, this was believed to be the future of video games. However, a combination of the high costs of VR headsets, the failure of Nintendo's UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and the rise in popularity of multiplayer gaming (the social aspect of which was difficult to successfully integrate into a VR setting) significantly decreased mainstream interest in the idea. By about 1998, virtual reality was more-or-less forgotten in video games, and is used mainly for scientific purposes (such as medical research) and TotallyRadical jokes about TheNineties. Time will tell if the Oculus Rift system is able to revive VR; it has received a lot of hype from its Website/{{Kickstarter}} campaign and its modern technology, and has received endorsements from the likes of [[Creator/IdSoftware John D. Carmack]] (who is currently the company's Chief Technology Officer), [[Creator/EpicGames Cliff Bleszinsky]], and [[Creator/ValveSoftware Gabe Newell]]. Though the Rift has finally come out, it's launch was lukewarm at best and currently most of the attention Oculus gets is negative. The worst being Oculus attempting to lock down it's games(Despite Palmer Lucky outright stating months ago that he would do no such thing) with DRM to prevent them from being played on the HTC Vive after someone made a program allowing people to do that. The DRM backfired massively, [[as [[EpicFail as it actually made it possible for people to pirate games from the Rift outright EpicFail]].outright]].
26th May '16 11:55:20 PM vexer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Virtual Reality. In the early to mid-1990s, this was believed to be the future of video games. However, a combination of the high costs of VR headsets, the failure of Nintendo's UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and the rise in popularity of multiplayer gaming (the social aspect of which was difficult to successfully integrate into a VR setting) significantly decreased mainstream interest in the idea. By about 1998, virtual reality was more-or-less forgotten in video games, and is used mainly for scientific purposes (such as medical research) and TotallyRadical jokes about TheNineties. Time will tell if the Oculus Rift system is able to revive VR; while it isn't out yet, it has received a lot of hype from its Website/{{Kickstarter}} campaign and its modern technology, and has received endorsements from the likes of [[Creator/IdSoftware John D. Carmack]] (who is currently the company's Chief Technology Officer), [[Creator/EpicGames Cliff Bleszinsky]], and [[Creator/ValveSoftware Gabe Newell]].

to:

* Virtual Reality. In the early to mid-1990s, this was believed to be the future of video games. However, a combination of the high costs of VR headsets, the failure of Nintendo's UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and the rise in popularity of multiplayer gaming (the social aspect of which was difficult to successfully integrate into a VR setting) significantly decreased mainstream interest in the idea. By about 1998, virtual reality was more-or-less forgotten in video games, and is used mainly for scientific purposes (such as medical research) and TotallyRadical jokes about TheNineties. Time will tell if the Oculus Rift system is able to revive VR; while it isn't out yet, it has received a lot of hype from its Website/{{Kickstarter}} campaign and its modern technology, and has received endorsements from the likes of [[Creator/IdSoftware John D. Carmack]] (who is currently the company's Chief Technology Officer), [[Creator/EpicGames Cliff Bleszinsky]], and [[Creator/ValveSoftware Gabe Newell]]. Though the Rift has finally come out, it's launch was lukewarm at best and currently most of the attention Oculus gets is negative. The worst being Oculus attempting to lock down it's games(Despite Palmer Lucky outright stating months ago that he would do no such thing) with DRM to prevent them from being played on the HTC Vive after someone made a program allowing people to do that. The DRM backfired massively, [[as it actually made it possible for people to pirate games from the Rift outright EpicFail]].
26th May '16 11:50:22 PM vexer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[FullMotionVideo FMV games]] were huge during the early '90s, and were once hailed as the future of gaming. But technology advanced and the genre got a reputation for shovelware (thanks to infamous bombs like ''VideoGame/NightTrap''), and by the end of the decade, developers and customers alike treated the genre as though it had been put on the sex offender registry.

to:

* [[FullMotionVideo FMV games]] were huge during the early '90s, and were once hailed as the future of gaming. But technology advanced and the genre got a reputation for shovelware (thanks to infamous bombs like ''VideoGame/NightTrap''), shovelware, and by the end of the decade, developers and customers alike treated the genre as though it had been put on the sex offender registry.
26th May '16 7:50:57 PM UltimateLazer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' has the dubious honor of managing to reach this without coming out...specifically, partially ''by'' not coming out. When it was first announced on Website/{{Kickstarter}}, it was one of the most popular games on there, getting so many funds that Comcept has to make new stretch goals when they realized how much momentum they were getting. Helped that it was a SpiritualSuccessor to the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' series, which many saw as being neglected by Creator/{{Capcom}}. However, between a cartoon adaptation being announced, [[VideoGame/RedAsh another Kickstarter project from Comcept]], people not being impressed with gameplay footage (all before the game came out, no less) and [[TroubledProduction numerous delays]], it's kinda become a punchline of jokes where fan reaction has changed from "near universal excitement" to anywhere between "just give me my game already" and "[[FanDisillusionment I don't want this anymore, give me my money back]]." Time will tell if this changes, but things aren't looking bright for its future. As a testament to how much Mighty No. 9 has fallen, the May 25th, 2016 trailer has garnered much more dislikes than likes.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' has the dubious honor of managing to reach this without coming out...specifically, partially ''by'' not coming out. When it was first announced on Website/{{Kickstarter}}, it was one of the most popular games on there, getting so many funds that Comcept has to make new stretch goals when they realized how much momentum they were getting. Helped that it was a SpiritualSuccessor to the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' series, which many saw as being neglected by Creator/{{Capcom}}. However, between a cartoon adaptation being announced, [[VideoGame/RedAsh another Kickstarter project from Comcept]], people not being impressed with gameplay footage (all before the game came out, no less) and [[TroubledProduction numerous delays]], it's kinda become a punchline of jokes where fan reaction has changed from "near universal excitement" to anywhere between "just give me my game already" and "[[FanDisillusionment I don't want this anymore, give me my money back]]." Time will tell if this changes, but things aren't looking bright for its future. As a testament to how much Mighty No. 9 has fallen, the May 25th, 2016 trailer has garnered much more dislikes than likes.likes[[note]]Though, making a TakeThat towards {{Anime}} fans with the line "make the bad guys cry like an anime fan on prom night" probably wasn't the best move, since anime fans make of a ''huge'' portion of the ''Mega Man'' fanbase[[/note]].
26th May '16 7:02:50 PM ADrago
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' has the dubious honor of managing to reach this without coming out...specifically, partially ''by'' not coming out. When it was first announced on Website/{{Kickstarter}}, it was one of the most popular games on there, getting so many funds that Comcept has to make new stretch goals when they realized how much momentum they were getting. Helped that it was a SpiritualSuccessor to the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' series, which many saw as being neglected by Creator/{{Capcom}}. However, between a cartoon adaptation being announced, [[VideoGame/RedAsh another Kickstarter project from Comcept]], people not being impressed with gameplay footage (all before the game came out, no less) and [[TroubledProduction numerous delays]], it's kinda become a punchline of jokes where fan reaction has changed from "near universal excitement" to anywhere between "just give me my game already" and "[[FanDisillusionment I don't want this anymore, give me my money back]]." Time will tell if this changes, but things aren't looking bright for its future. As a testament to how much Mighty No. 9 has fallen, the May 25th, 2016 trailer has garnered much more dislikes than likes.



* ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' has the dubious honor of managing to reach this without coming out...specifically, partially ''by'' not coming out. When it was first announced on Website/{{Kickstarter}}, it was one of the most popular games on there, getting so many funds that Comcept has to make new stretch goals when they realized how much momentum they were getting. Helped that it was a SpiritualSuccessor to the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' series, which many saw as being neglected by Creator/{{Capcom}}. However, between a cartoon adaptation being announced, [[VideoGame/RedAsh another Kickstarter project from Comcept]], people not being impressed with gameplay footage (all before the game came out, no less) and [[TroubledProduction numerous delays]], it's kinda become a punchline of jokes where fan reaction has changed from "near universal excitement" to anywhere between "just give me my game already" and "[[FanDisillusionment I don't want this anymore, give me my money back]]." Time will tell if this changes, but things aren't looking bright for its future.
This list shows the last 10 events of 519. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.VideoGames