History DeaderThanDisco / Toys

26th Aug '16 7:26:16 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Any toys that resemble real-life firearms or weapons. Drug and/or gang wars of TheEighties and onward involved a lot of gun-play, and city kids who brandished realistic fake weapons risked being shot for real by criminals, police officers, or both. To safeguard kids, toy guns now are brightly colored (black is disappearing), usually have a tell-all orange tip barrel, represent no commonly available firearms, and can't be easily painted to resemble real guns -- they look more like {{fantasy}} / SciFi weapons. Also thanks to this law, the original ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' toy of Megatron cannot be reissued in the US. Usually, their appearance is also out of proportion with real guns so they can be spotted at first glance. Cap guns, meanwhile, have vanished due to the public's tendency to mistake their noise for real gunshots. {{Water guns|AndBalloons}} like [[Toys/NERFBrand Super Soakers]], however, are still very popular, largely because nobody could confuse them for real guns. The only "toy" guns still sold today that resemble real weapons are BB rifles, which get by on the GrandfatherClause (the Daisy Red Ryder BB gun was famously featured in ''Film/AChristmasStory'', after all), and Airsoft guns, which are often very expensive and marketed strictly to hobbyists and the like. And even in those cases, nearly half of all US states regulate their sale and use.
* Toy soldiers based on any historical war. Back in the days of WorldWarII, the US Military [[BlackAndWhiteMorality were undoubtedly the rough 'n' ready good guys fighting valiantly for liberty and justice against the evil]] UsefulNotes/NaziGermany regime. With the onset of TheVietnamWar and especially TheWarOnTerror, we began seeing more shades of gray, such as innocent people on "the other side" suffering as a result of the wars, the American Government making some objectively boneheaded decisions, and fathers who served in the wars either dying or coming home crippled. It more-or-less became clear that WarIsHell and ''not'' the kind of thing we want our kids glorifying.
** This can be seen easily with ''GIJoe.'' The original figures were explicitly designed as American infantrymen, but after Vietnam, the line shifted focus to adventure stories or battling absurd supervillains, largely jettisoning anything that could associated with an actual war. It's hard to imagine, for instance, Snake-Eyes in Afghanistan.

to:

* Any toys that resemble real-life firearms or weapons. Drug and/or The crack epidemic and ensuing gang wars of TheEighties in the '80s and onward '90s involved a lot of gun-play, gunplay, and city kids who brandished realistic fake weapons risked being shot for real by criminals, police officers, or both. To safeguard kids, toy guns now are brightly colored (black is disappearing), usually have a tell-all orange tip barrel, have exaggerated proportions so that they can be recognized as toys at first glance, can't be easily painted or remodeled to resemble the real thing, and represent no commonly available firearms, and can't be easily painted to resemble real guns -- they look looking more like {{fantasy}} / SciFi weapons. Also thanks to this law, {{fantasy}}[=/=]ScienceFiction weapons than anything. (Because of these laws, the original ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' toy of Megatron cannot be reissued in the US. Usually, their appearance is also out of proportion with real guns so they can be spotted at first glance. US.) Cap guns, meanwhile, have vanished due to the public's tendency to mistake their noise for real gunshots. {{Water guns|AndBalloons}} like [[Toys/NERFBrand Super Soakers]], however, are still very popular, largely because nobody could confuse them for real guns. The only "toy" guns still sold today that resemble real weapons are BB rifles, which get by on the GrandfatherClause (the Daisy Red Ryder BB gun was famously featured in ''Film/AChristmasStory'', after all), and Airsoft guns, which are often very expensive and marketed strictly to hobbyists and the like. And even in those cases, nearly half of all US states regulate their sale and use.
* Toy soldiers based on any historical war. Back in the days of WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the US Military military [[BlackAndWhiteMorality were undoubtedly the rough 'n' ready good guys fighting valiantly for liberty and justice against the evil]] UsefulNotes/NaziGermany regime. evil regimes of]] UsefulNotes/{{NaziGermany and UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan. With the onset of TheVietnamWar UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar and especially TheWarOnTerror, we began seeing more shades of gray, such as innocent people on "the other side" suffering as a result of the wars, the American Government government making some objectively boneheaded decisions, and fathers parents who served in the wars either dying or coming home crippled. It became more-or-less became clear that WarIsHell and ''not'' the kind of thing we want our kids glorifying.
** This can be seen easily with ''GIJoe.''Franchise/GIJoe.'' The original figures were explicitly designed as American infantrymen, but after Vietnam, the line shifted focus to adventure stories or battling absurd supervillains, largely jettisoning anything that could be associated with an actual war. It's hard to imagine, for instance, Snake-Eyes in Afghanistan.



* Sea Monkeys was one of those "hard to believe it was popular" fads. Inspired by ant farms, these were homegrown brine shrimp marketed as novelty aquarium pets, heavily marketed, especially in comic books starting in 1957. Unfortunately, the advertising was rather deceptive, showing humanoid animals that bore no real resemblance to the actual shrimp, and many buyers were disappointed by the dissimilarity and by the short lifespan of the animals, and the fad eventually died out. Although, Sea Monkeys had [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome one moment of glory]] in 1998, when astronaut John Glenn took some aboard Space Shuttle ''Discovery'' during mission STS-95. After nine days in space, they were returned to Earth, and hatched eight weeks later apparently unaffected by their travels.
* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. However, the aforementioned "making toy guns resemble real life firearms" ended up doing them in when a line of water guns were connected to a string of incidents where people would be robbed by those using these toys. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. There was a short 2000 revival, but that lasted ''one game''. Even worse, the game was so poorly received that it's rumored Acclaim used the logo to protect their image.

to:

* Sea Monkeys was one of those "hard to believe it was popular" fads. Inspired by ant farms, these were homegrown brine shrimp marketed as novelty aquarium pets, heavily marketed, especially in comic books starting in 1957. Unfortunately, the advertising was rather deceptive, showing humanoid animals that bore no real resemblance to the actual shrimp, and many buyers were disappointed by the dissimilarity and by the short lifespan of the animals, and the fad eventually died out. Although, However, Sea Monkeys had [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome one moment of glory]] in 1998, when astronaut John Glenn took some aboard Space Shuttle ''Discovery'' during mission STS-95. After nine days in space, they were returned to Earth, and hatched eight weeks later apparently unaffected by their travels.
* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. However, the aforementioned "making toy guns resemble real life firearms" ended up doing them in when a their [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entertech Entertech]] line of water guns was used in actual robberies due to their likeness to real guns, while two children carrying them were connected to a string of incidents where people would be robbed shot dead by those using these toys. Now police for the same reason. Now, they are mostly remembered for two things, things: [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed video games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. There was a short 2000 revival, but that lasted ''one game''. Even worse, the game game'' that was so poorly received that it's rumored Acclaim used the logo to protect their image.
20th Aug '16 4:23:26 AM Blazer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. There was a short 2000 revival, but that lasted ''one game''. Even worse, the game was so poorly received that it's rumored Acclaim used the logo to protect their image.

to:

* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. However, the aforementioned "making toy guns resemble real life firearms" ended up doing them in when a line of water guns were connected to a string of incidents where people would be robbed by those using these toys. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. There was a short 2000 revival, but that lasted ''one game''. Even worse, the game was so poorly received that it's rumored Acclaim used the logo to protect their image.
11th Aug '16 9:29:52 PM Kelothan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_darts Lawn Darts]] have not been popular in the United States since the early 70s, and ''not'' because it was a fad that died out. Rather, they were very, ''very'' dangerous. This ban was challenged in the late 70s, and the ban was lifted with the stipulation that they not be marketed as toys, but after a fatal accident in 1987, the Consumer Product Safety commission reinstated the full ban. Since then, they've been outlawed in Canada too, and it's unlikely they'll be popular again. Some satirical modern fiction (like say, ''Film/BatmanReturns'' and ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'') have since portrayed them as toy-themed weapons.

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_darts Lawn Darts]] have not been popular in the United States since the early 70s, and ''not'' because it was a fad that died out. Rather, they were very, ''very'' dangerous. This ban was challenged in the late 70s, and the ban was lifted with the stipulation that they not be marketed as toys, but after a fatal accident in 1987, the Consumer Product Safety commission reinstated the full ban. Since then, they've been outlawed in Canada too, and it's unlikely they'll be popular again. Some satirical modern fiction (like say, ''Film/BatmanReturns'' and ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'') have since portrayed them as toy-themed weapons. They're even on the Toys section of the DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible page.
7th Aug '16 2:28:51 AM LadyJaneGrey
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_darts Lawn Darts]] have not been popular in the United States since the early 70s, and ''not'' because it was a fad that died out. Rather, they were very, ''very'' dangerous. This ban was challenged in the late 70s, and the ban was lifted with the stipulation that they not be marketed as toys, but after a fatal accident in 1987, the Consumer Product Safety commission reinstated the full ban. Since then, they've been outlawed in Canada too, and it's unlikely they'll be popular again. Some satirical modern fiction (like say, ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'') have since portrayed them as toy-themed weapons.

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_darts Lawn Darts]] have not been popular in the United States since the early 70s, and ''not'' because it was a fad that died out. Rather, they were very, ''very'' dangerous. This ban was challenged in the late 70s, and the ban was lifted with the stipulation that they not be marketed as toys, but after a fatal accident in 1987, the Consumer Product Safety commission reinstated the full ban. Since then, they've been outlawed in Canada too, and it's unlikely they'll be popular again. Some satirical modern fiction (like say, ''Film/BatmanReturns'' and ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'') have since portrayed them as toy-themed weapons.
6th Aug '16 8:14:09 PM LadyJaneGrey
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_darts Lawn Darts]] have not been popular in the United States since the early 70s, and ''not'' because it was a fad that died out. Rather, they were very, ''very'' dangerous. This ban was challenged in the late 70s, and the ban was lifted with the stipulation that they not be marketed as toys, but after a fatal accident in 1987, the Consumer Product Safety commission reinstated the full ban. Since then, they've been outlawed in Canada too, and it's unlikely they'll be popular again. Some satirical modern fiction (like say, ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'') have since portrayed them as toy-themed weapons.
5th Aug '16 1:45:17 PM AreYouTyler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Toys/{{Bratz}} dolls. When they first came out at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the fashion dolls were hugely popular in a way no prior Franchise/{{Barbie}} rival had ever been, and ''very'' controversial due to their "slutty" appearance for characters who were supposed to be teenagers. Now thanks to said controversy dying out, several failed retools and {{spinoff}}s, a lengthy hiatus due to legal issues, and the rise of doll lines such as Toys/MonsterHigh and the WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls that feature LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with truly distinctive personalities and strong WorldBuilding, the Bratz franchise is struggling to stay afloat and is virtually dead. There's a good chance most toy-buying kids aren't aware the line still exists, or even ''existed''. A reboot of the line came along in 2015 but many, even former fans, doubt it will last long. Even Moxie Girlz, created by the same company to replace it, isn't doing too well and now exists mainly as a LighterAndSofter budget line.

to:

* Toys/{{Bratz}} dolls. When they first came out at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the fashion dolls were hugely popular in a way no prior Franchise/{{Barbie}} rival had ever been, and ''very'' controversial due to their "slutty" appearance for characters who were supposed to be teenagers. Now thanks to said controversy dying out, several failed retools and {{spinoff}}s, a terrible live-action movie starring Creator/JonVoight, a lengthy hiatus due to legal issues, and the rise of doll lines such as Toys/MonsterHigh and the WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls that feature LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with truly distinctive personalities and strong WorldBuilding, the Bratz franchise is struggling to stay afloat and is virtually dead. There's a good chance most toy-buying kids aren't aware the line still exists, or even ''existed''. A reboot of the line came along in 2015 but many, even former fans, doubt it will last long. Even Moxie Girlz, created by the same company to replace it, isn't doing too well and now exists mainly as a LighterAndSofter budget line.
29th Jun '16 1:16:24 AM Kelothan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name (except for a short 2000 revival).

to:

* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name (except for name. There was a short 2000 revival).revival, but that lasted ''one game''. Even worse, the game was so poorly received that it's rumored Acclaim used the logo to protect their image.
9th Jun '16 10:39:14 AM DerplesTheMagicalUnicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Toys/{{Bratz}} dolls. When they first came out at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the fashion dolls were hugely popular in a way no prior Franchise/{{Barbie}} rival had ever been, and ''very'' controversial due to their "slutty" appearance for characters who were supposed to be teenagers. Now thanks to said controversy dying out, several failed retools and {{spinoff}}s, a lengthy hiatus due to legal issues, and the rise of doll lines such as Toys/MonsterHigh that feature LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with truly distinctive personalities and strong WorldBuilding, the Bratz franchise is struggling to stay afloat and is virtually dead. There's a good chance most toy-buying kids aren't aware the line still exists, or even ''existed''. A reboot of the line came along in 2015 but many, even former fans, doubt it will last long. Even Moxie Girlz, created by the same company to replace it, isn't doing too well and now exists mainly as a LighterAndSofter budget line.

to:

* Toys/{{Bratz}} dolls. When they first came out at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the fashion dolls were hugely popular in a way no prior Franchise/{{Barbie}} rival had ever been, and ''very'' controversial due to their "slutty" appearance for characters who were supposed to be teenagers. Now thanks to said controversy dying out, several failed retools and {{spinoff}}s, a lengthy hiatus due to legal issues, and the rise of doll lines such as Toys/MonsterHigh and the WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls that feature LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with truly distinctive personalities and strong WorldBuilding, the Bratz franchise is struggling to stay afloat and is virtually dead. There's a good chance most toy-buying kids aren't aware the line still exists, or even ''existed''. A reboot of the line came along in 2015 but many, even former fans, doubt it will last long. Even Moxie Girlz, created by the same company to replace it, isn't doing too well and now exists mainly as a LighterAndSofter budget line.
7th Jun '16 6:33:38 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now, thanks to many dumb dicisions and videogames that were mostly (but not all were, mind you) [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames garbage]] from they are mostly remembered for two things, [[DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible being quite possibly the worst video game publisher of all time]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd bashing them repeatedly. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. However, in 2000, they briefly revived the name for ''Spirit of Speed 1937'', only because they knew they had a stinker on their hands and figured they might as well put the LJN logo on it.

to:

* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now, thanks to many dumb dicisions and videogames that were mostly (but not all were, mind you) [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames garbage]] from Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible being quite possibly the worst video game publisher of all time]], [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd bashing them repeatedly. trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. However, in 2000, they briefly revived the name (except for ''Spirit of Speed 1937'', only because they knew they had a stinker on their hands and figured they might as well put the LJN logo on it.short 2000 revival).
7th Jun '16 6:30:01 PM Kelothan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. However, in 2000, they briefly revived the name for ''Spirit of Speed 1937'', only because they knew they had a stinker on their hands and figured they might as well put the LJN logo on it.

to:

* Creator/LJNToys used to be up there with Creator/{{Mattel}}. Now Now, thanks to many dumb dicisions and videogames that were mostly (but not all were, mind you) [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames garbage]] from they are mostly remembered for two things, [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames abysmal licensed games]], [[DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible being quite possibly the worst video game publisher of all time]], and WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd trashing said games.bashing them repeatedly. The company's swan song was in 1995, when Creator/{{Acclaim}} (which itself became DeaderThanDisco), which acquired LJN in 1990, retired the LJN brand name. However, in 2000, they briefly revived the name for ''Spirit of Speed 1937'', only because they knew they had a stinker on their hands and figured they might as well put the LJN logo on it.
This list shows the last 10 events of 93. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.Toys