History DeaderThanDisco / Sports

24th May '16 10:17:51 PM lizaphile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Old-fashioned artificial turf surfaces (most commonly AstroTurf) were often used in many stadiums opening during the [[TheSeventies 1970s]] (those often being nicknamed [[FanNickname cookie-cutter stadiums]]) in order to switch easily between baseball and football configurations. However, the surface being especially hard compared to natural grass (and [[TechnologyMarchesOn technological advances]] such as [=FieldTurf=] that are softer than Astroturf) led to the former's extinction by the TurnOfTheMillennium. The only current artificial fields in the major leagues exist solely in the AL East in Toronto and Tampa/St.Petersburg's domed venues.

to:

* Old-fashioned artificial turf surfaces (most commonly AstroTurf) were often used in many stadiums opening during the [[TheSeventies 1970s]] (those often being nicknamed [[FanNickname cookie-cutter stadiums]]) in order to switch easily between baseball and football configurations. However, the surface being especially hard compared to natural grass (and [[TechnologyMarchesOn technological advances]] such as [=FieldTurf=] that are softer than Astroturf) led to the former's extinction by the TurnOfTheMillennium. The only current artificial fields in the major leagues exist solely in the AL East in Toronto and Tampa/St.Petersburg's domed venues. In 2016 the Blue Jays eradicated the final 'sliding pit' configuration in the majors for a full dirt infield, and in 2019 plans to put in an all-grass field when the football Argonauts move out.
7th May '16 3:00:49 PM lledsmar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ryan Leaf. A Heisman Trophy finalist during his time at Washington State University, he was the second pick in the NFL Draft in 1998, behind UsefulNotes/PeytonManning. It was predicted that he would go on to be one of the all-time [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] greats. Fast forward to today, and he's regarded as one of the biggest draft busts in NFL history, while Manning retired a SuperBowl champion in 2016 and is a surefire Hall of Famer. Leaf's four-year career was marked by injuries, bad relations with his teammates and fans, hostility to the sports media and poor performance on the field. His fall was so infamous that, every draft, sports writers speculate on which hot college prospect will become the "next Ryan Leaf" by flopping hard in the NFL. As of now, the "next" Ryan Leaf appears to be [[http://bleacherreport.com/articles/413296-twilight-eclipse-top-10-athletes-who-sucked-the-life-out-of-franchises#page/3 JaMarcus Russell]].

to:

* Ryan Leaf. A Heisman Trophy finalist during his time at Washington State University, he was the second pick in the NFL Draft in 1998, behind UsefulNotes/PeytonManning. It was predicted that he would go on to be one of the all-time [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] greats. Fast forward to today, and he's regarded as one of the biggest draft busts in NFL history, while Manning retired a SuperBowl champion in 2016 and is a surefire Hall of Famer. Leaf's four-year career was marked by injuries, bad relations with his teammates and fans, hostility to the sports media and poor performance on the field. His fall was so infamous that, every draft, sports writers speculate on which hot college prospect will become the "next Ryan Leaf" by flopping hard in the NFL. As of now, the "next" Ryan Leaf appears to be [[http://bleacherreport.com/articles/413296-twilight-eclipse-top-10-athletes-who-sucked-the-life-out-of-franchises#page/3 JaMarcus Russell]].



* Tim Lincecum, nicknamed "The Freak," was one of the best pitchers in baseball from 2007 to 2011. His velocity, combined with his wicked strikeout numbers, made him widely touted as the next huge thing in baseball and a future Hall-of-Famer. However, beginning in 2012, Lincecum began to experience a precipitous decline from which he has never really recovered. While he still pitches for the Giants as a pretty good relief pitcher, he today is pretty much an afterthought when it comes to discussing important MLB pitchers.
6th May '16 2:07:17 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This tends to happen to any number of popular athletes who are revealed to have been using steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs. For baseball, Ryan Braun and the "steroid era" in the late '90s/early '00s are listed above. Other examples include...
** Cyclist Lance Armstrong is, perhaps, the biggest and most tragic example of an athlete falling from grace in this manner. He was an American sporting hero at the TurnOfTheMillennium, having not only won seven TourDeFrance titles, but having done so after beating testicular cancer. He used his profile to establish a highly successful charity dedicated to curing cancer, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, whose Live Strong yellow rubber bracelets became a ubiquitous fashion item mid-decade. However, it had long been rumored that Armstrong's cycling success was a bit less than squeaky-clean, and that he had been doping his way to the top. When those rumors were confirmed in 2012, Armstrong was forced to step down from the foundation bearing his name, and the International Cycling Union (the governing body for the sport) stripped him of his seven Tour de France titles.[[note]]Although it should be noted that none of his vacated titles were awarded to any of his competitors since nearly all of them were ''also'' found to be guilty of doping.[[/note]] Now, while he still has his supporters due to his charity work, a lot of people view him as an embarrassment to the sport and a lousy person as well, considering he ''sued'' people for defamation and ''won'' despite their doping claims eventually being revealed as the truth. A common joke was that the Live Strong bracelets should now read "Lie Strong".

to:

* This tends to happen to any number of popular athletes who are revealed to have been using steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs. For baseball, Ryan Braun and the "steroid era" in the late '90s/early '00s are listed above. Other examples include...
**
Cyclist Lance Armstrong is, perhaps, the biggest and most tragic example of an athlete falling from grace in this manner. He was an American sporting hero at the TurnOfTheMillennium, having not only won seven TourDeFrance titles, but having done so after beating testicular cancer. He used his profile to establish a highly successful charity dedicated to curing cancer, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, whose Live Strong yellow rubber bracelets became a ubiquitous fashion item mid-decade. However, it had long been rumored that Armstrong's cycling success was a bit less than squeaky-clean, and that he had been doping his way to the top. When those rumors were confirmed in 2012, Armstrong was forced to step down from the foundation bearing his name, and the International Cycling Union (the governing body for the sport) stripped him of his seven Tour de France titles.[[note]]Although it should be noted that none of his vacated titles were awarded to any of his competitors since nearly all of them were ''also'' found to be guilty of doping.[[/note]] Now, while he still has his supporters due to his charity work, a lot of people view him as an embarrassment to the sport and a lousy person as well, considering he ''sued'' people for defamation and ''won'' despite their doping claims eventually being revealed as the truth. A common joke was that the Live Strong bracelets should now read "Lie Strong".



* The Rookie of the Year award in various sports has proven to be a total crapshoot when it comes to predicting future greatness. Many have successful careers, but even more seem to quickly fade into obscurity.
** Some of Major League Baseball's greatest players were Rookies of the Year, including Willie Mays, Pete Rose, and Tom Seaver. But not all [=ROYs=] have gone on to great careers. Anyone remember Pat Listach? Joe Charboneau? Don Schwall?
** The very ''concept'' of Rookie of the Year had become a joke in UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} by 2012. After two years where only one candidate a year even met the minimum number of starts to be eligible for the award, the pair of choices in 2012 came down to two drivers who had mostly [[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything parked their cars after a few laps each week]], with a best finish of 26th between the two of them. The fact that the winner (Stephen Leicht, driving the #33) was the one who had only started 15 races (vs. Josh Wise's 30 starts in the #26) only made it even more laughable, and said winner was actually excluded from the year end banquet celebrating the top honors in Sprint Cup. However, it's come back around since then, particularly with the very strong run by Kyle Larson in 2014 (eight top fives, 17 top tens) in a class where ''eight'' rookies met the minimum bar for consideration (eight starts).

to:

* The Rookie of the Year award in various sports has proven to be a total crapshoot when it comes to predicting future greatness. Many have successful careers, but even more seem to quickly fade into obscurity.
** Some of Major League Baseball's greatest players were Rookies of the Year, including Willie Mays, Pete Rose, and Tom Seaver. But not all [=ROYs=] have gone on to great careers. Anyone remember Pat Listach? Joe Charboneau? Don Schwall?
**
The very ''concept'' of Rookie of the Year had become a joke in UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} by 2012. After two years where only one candidate a year even met the minimum number of starts to be eligible for the award, the pair of choices in 2012 came down to two drivers who had mostly [[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything parked their cars after a few laps each week]], with a best finish of 26th between the two of them. The fact that the winner (Stephen Leicht, driving the #33) was the one who had only started 15 races (vs. Josh Wise's 30 starts in the #26) only made it even more laughable, and said winner was actually excluded from the year end banquet celebrating the top honors in Sprint Cup. However, it's come back around since then, particularly with the very strong run by Kyle Larson in 2014 (eight top fives, 17 top tens) in a class where ''eight'' rookies met the minimum bar for consideration (eight starts).



** Multi-purpose stadiums (often nicknamed cookie cutter stadiums) became popular in the 1960s and 70s when cities wanted save money by building stadiums that both their baseball and football teams could use. Some stadiums were even renovated to be able to house both sports. However, the designs of these stadium resulted too much foul territory for the baseball fields, cramped sidelines for football, and poor seat sight lines for both sports. The trend fell out of favor by the mid-[[TheNineties 1990s]] starting with the opening of the Baltimore Orioles' baseball only Camden Yards stadium in 1992. As the 1990s and 2000s progressed, many of the multi-purpose stadia (most of which also used old-fashioned AstroTurf) were closed and demolished to be replaced with separate football and baseball stadiums instead of sharing a stadium. Currently, o.co Coliseum in Oakland and Rogers Centre in Toronto are the only stadiums left housing both a Major League Baseball (Oakland A's/Toronto Blue Jays) and professional football (Oakland Raiders/Toronto Argonauts) franchise.
* It's often been said that, in the early-mid 20th century, America's "big three" sports were baseball, boxing, and horse racing. Of those three, only baseball can still claim to be one of the most popular sports in the nation, and even then, its popularity is largely restricted to certain geographical areas and arguably certain demographic groups. Boxing and horse racing, meanwhile, have both undergone a precipitous decline. While both sports still occasionally experience short-lived bursts of popularity when a star fighter or horse emerges, they typically recede back into obscurity right afterwards.
** Boxing had huge problems at the organizational level that it was never able to rein in. An overabundance of titles and sanctioning bodies cheapened the ones that actually mattered, and many of the sport's biggest and most exciting fights were locked behind an expensive pay-per-view wall that casual fans felt wasn't worth the money. Furthermore, fighters suffered a heavy toll both physical and financial -- the injuries (especially head/brain injuries) endemic to boxing, along with ugly exploitation of fighters by boxing promoters, discouraged many future stars from picking up the sport. Many went into UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts instead, where individual promoters are done away with in favor of organizational promotion, and (even with its reputation as a BloodSport) there is less reliance on the sort of striking that causes permanent brain damage. Perhaps not coincidentally, MMA enjoyed its greatest boom years just as boxing was going into near-terminal decline.
** For horse racing, the fact that most of the fans were more interested in the gambling side of the sport than the actual competition eventually took over, and the sport had a hard time adapting once legal casino gambling emerged as a serious competitor in the late 20th century. Eventually, many racing courses themselves introduced slots and tables to get people in the door. [[ValuesDissonance Changing attitudes towards animal welfare]] also doomed horse racing, as the poor treatment and short lifespans of many racehorses has caused animal welfare groups to call for a boycott of the sport.[[note]]Case in point: the Creator/{{HBO}} series ''Series/{{Luck}}'', a drama about horse racing from the creator of ''Series/NYPDBlue'' and ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'' that, despite a positive critical reception and decent ratings, was swiftly yanked from the air after one season due to the deaths of three horses during production.[[/note]]
*** Related, off-track betting in states such as Illinois and New York used to be big until Internet gambling became normalized. The New York parlors went out of business in a calamitous bankruptcy, while in Illinois, it's pretty much a minor check-off in a few sports bars. Off-track betting is still a reasonably big deal in a few states with traditions of horse-racing and off-track gambling, such as UsefulNotes/NewJersey (which has--largely successfully--tried to market itself as the center of gambling on the East Coast, with the laxest gaming laws east of the Rockies and, of course, the casino center in Atlantic City).

to:

** * Multi-purpose stadiums (often nicknamed cookie cutter stadiums) became popular in the 1960s and 70s when cities wanted save money by building stadiums that both their baseball and football teams could use. Some stadiums were even renovated to be able to house both sports. However, the designs of these stadium resulted too much foul territory for the baseball fields, cramped sidelines for football, and poor seat sight lines for both sports. The trend fell out of favor by the mid-[[TheNineties 1990s]] starting with the opening of the Baltimore Orioles' baseball only Camden Yards stadium in 1992. As the 1990s and 2000s progressed, many of the multi-purpose stadia (most of which also used old-fashioned AstroTurf) were closed and demolished to be replaced with separate football and baseball stadiums instead of sharing a stadium. Currently, o.co Coliseum in Oakland and Rogers Centre in Toronto are the only stadiums left housing both a Major League Baseball (Oakland A's/Toronto Blue Jays) and professional football (Oakland Raiders/Toronto Argonauts) franchise.
* It's often been said that, in the early-mid 20th century, America's "big three" sports were baseball, boxing, and horse racing. Of those three, only baseball can still claim to be one of the most popular sports in the nation, and even then, its popularity is largely restricted to certain geographical areas and arguably certain demographic groups. Boxing and horse racing, meanwhile, have both undergone a precipitous decline. While both sports still occasionally experience short-lived bursts of popularity when a star fighter or horse emerges, they typically recede back into obscurity right afterwards.
** Boxing had huge problems at the organizational level that it was never able to rein in. An overabundance of titles and sanctioning bodies cheapened the ones that actually mattered, and many of the sport's biggest and most exciting fights were locked behind an expensive pay-per-view wall that casual fans felt wasn't worth the money. Furthermore, fighters suffered a heavy toll both physical and financial -- the injuries (especially head/brain injuries) endemic to boxing, along with ugly exploitation of fighters by boxing promoters, discouraged many future stars from picking up the sport. Many went into UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts instead, where individual promoters are done away with in favor of organizational promotion, and (even with its reputation as a BloodSport) there is less reliance on the sort of striking that causes permanent brain damage. Perhaps not coincidentally, MMA enjoyed its greatest boom years just as boxing was going into near-terminal decline.
** For horse racing, the fact that most of the fans were more interested in the gambling side of the sport than the actual competition eventually took over, and the sport had a hard time adapting once legal casino gambling emerged as a serious competitor in the late 20th century. Eventually, many racing courses themselves introduced slots and tables to get people in the door. [[ValuesDissonance Changing attitudes towards animal welfare]] also doomed horse racing, as the poor treatment and short lifespans of many racehorses has caused animal welfare groups to call for a boycott of the sport.[[note]]Case in point: the Creator/{{HBO}} series ''Series/{{Luck}}'', a drama about horse racing from the creator of ''Series/NYPDBlue'' and ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'' that, despite a positive critical reception and decent ratings, was swiftly yanked from the air after one season due to the deaths of three horses during production.[[/note]]
*** Related, off-track betting in states such as Illinois and New York used to be big until Internet gambling became normalized. The New York parlors went out of business in a calamitous bankruptcy, while in Illinois, it's pretty much a minor check-off in a few sports bars. Off-track betting is still a reasonably big deal in a few states with traditions of horse-racing and off-track gambling, such as UsefulNotes/NewJersey (which has--largely successfully--tried to market itself as the center of gambling on the East Coast, with the laxest gaming laws east of the Rockies and, of course, the casino center in Atlantic City).
franchise.
6th May '16 1:32:13 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* It's often been said that, in the early-mid 20th century, America's "big three" sports were baseball, boxing, and horse racing. Of those three, only baseball can still claim to be one of the most popular sports in the nation, and even then, its popularity is largely restricted to certain geographical areas. Boxing and horse racing, meanwhile, have both undergone a precipitous decline. While both sports still occasionally experience short-lived bursts of popularity when a star fighter or horse emerges, they typically recede back into obscurity right afterwards.

to:

* It's often been said that, in the early-mid 20th century, America's "big three" sports were baseball, boxing, and horse racing. Of those three, only baseball can still claim to be one of the most popular sports in the nation, and even then, its popularity is largely restricted to certain geographical areas.areas and arguably certain demographic groups. Boxing and horse racing, meanwhile, have both undergone a precipitous decline. While both sports still occasionally experience short-lived bursts of popularity when a star fighter or horse emerges, they typically recede back into obscurity right afterwards.
6th May '16 1:24:13 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Dropkick. Back in the days when nobody cared much about the NFL, extra points and filed goals were shot in a manner not unlike in rugby with the ball being dropped from the hand and kicked as it touches the ground. However, a change in the shape of footballs (to aid passing) as well as a general nerfing of the kicking aspect of the game has ensured the dropkick only ever gets used as a gimmick. Losing a game on a botched hold in the last seconds is bad enough, but losing a game on a drop kick that bounces the wrong way would be even worse. However, given the high success rate of extra points and the NFL's stated desire to change that, dropkicks may be forced upon players by rule changes some day.

to:

* The Dropkick. Back in the days when nobody cared much about the NFL, extra points and filed field goals were shot in a manner not unlike in rugby with the ball being dropped from the hand and kicked as it touches the ground. However, a change in the shape of footballs (to aid passing) as well as a general nerfing of the kicking aspect of the game has ensured the dropkick only ever gets used as a gimmick. Losing a game on a botched hold in the last seconds is bad enough, but losing a game on a drop kick that bounces the wrong way would be even worse. However, given the high success rate of extra points and the NFL's stated desire to change that, dropkicks may be forced upon players by rule changes some day.
2nd May '16 11:22:17 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The Dropkick. Back in the days when nobody cared much about the NFL, extra points and filed goals were shot in a manner not unlike in rugby with the ball being dropped from the hand and kicked as it touches the ground. However, a change in the shape of footballs (to aid passing) as well as a general nerfing of the kicking aspect of the game has ensured the dropkick only ever gets used as a gimmick. Losing a game on a botched hold in the last seconds is bad enough, but losing a game on a drop kick that bounces the wrong way would be even worse. However, given the high success rate of extra points and the NFL's stated desire to change that, dropkicks may be forced upon players by rule changes some day.
2nd May '16 1:10:02 AM BigBertha
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* College football's Heisman Trophy has been dubbed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisman_curse "the kiss of death for college players"]], given how few winners have made it into the Football Hall of Fame or even gone on to be particularly celebrated NFL players. Many more have disappeared into irrelevance in the league when their skills, for whatever reason, don't translate to the pro level.

to:

* College football's Heisman Trophy has been dubbed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisman_curse "the kiss of death for college players"]], given how players"]]. Only a few winners have made it into the Football managed to score NFL Hall of Fame or even gone on to be particularly celebrated NFL players. Many more careers, with the latest being Charles Woodson (1997). Some of the winners have disappeared into irrelevance had long and decent careers in the league when their skills, for whatever reason, don't translate league, but nothing special, such as Vinny Testaverde and Jim Plunkett. The others have long since faded into obscurity, completely failing to the pro level. make a lasting impression as pros, such as two-time winner Archie Griffin never recording a 1,000 yard season.



* Being the first player taken in the draft is hit and miss whenever it comes to greatness. The MLB produced hall of fame talent in Chipper Jones and Ken Griffey Jr., but also Brien Taylor and Steve Chilcott (neither of whom ever reached the Majors). The NFL spawned many greats like Chuck Bednarik, Creator/PeytonManning, and Bruce Smith; but also notorious busts in Jamarcus Russell, King Hill, and Steve Emtman. The NBA gave us Shaq, Tim Duncan, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; but also Kwame Brown and Larue Martin.

to:

* Being the first player taken in the draft is hit and miss whenever it comes to greatness. The MLB produced hall of fame talent in Chipper Jones and Ken Griffey Jr., but also Brien Taylor and Steve Chilcott (neither of whom ever reached the Majors). The NFL spawned many greats like Chuck Bednarik, Creator/PeytonManning, and Bruce Smith; but also notorious busts in Jamarcus Russell, King Hill, and Steve Emtman. The NBA gave us Shaq, Tim Duncan, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; but also Kwame Brown and Larue Martin. Over in the NHL, Mario Lemieux was a legend, while Alexandre Daigle was a legend''ary bust''.
1st May '16 1:02:03 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The notion that the Cleveland Browns are a title candidate. Back when the Cleveland Browns were founded in the AAFC (a competitor to the NFL just after World War II which brought us the Browns and the 49ers as well as innovations to the game), they were one of the best teams in Football, dominating their league and a regular contender for the top spot in the NFL upon joining that league. That mostly ended in the 1960s, but the Browns were still deemed a good team more often than not, albeit with tendencies of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut. Than the 1995-1999 Cleveland Brown relocation controversy happened, where the Browns essentially moved to Baltimore and became the Ravens but a new Browns team would join the league in 1999 keeping all history, records and colors of the old team. The new Browns have in the decade and a half since then only made the Playoffs twice and never once looked like a serious competitor. True, they have a tough division to play in with the powerhouses from Baltimore and Pittsburgh and a Cincinnati team that's racked up a good playoff run in TheNewTens (albeit with their own EveryYearTheyFizzleOut problems)[[note]]Cincy's five straight playoff berths from 2011-15 have resulted in five straight Wild Card losses[[/note]], but tell anybody from the 1950s and 1960s what the Browns would turn into and they would look at you as if you'd declared to be the king of China.

to:

* The notion that the Cleveland Browns are a title candidate. Back when the Cleveland Browns were founded in the AAFC (a competitor to the NFL just after World War II which brought us the Browns and the 49ers as well as innovations to the game), they were one of the best teams in Football, dominating their league and a regular contender for the top spot in the NFL upon joining that league. That mostly ended in the 1960s, but the Browns were still deemed a good team more often than not, albeit with tendencies of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut. Than Then the 1995-1999 Cleveland Brown relocation controversy happened, where the Browns essentially moved to Baltimore and became the Ravens but a new Browns team would join the league in 1999 keeping all history, records and colors of the old team. The new Browns have in the decade and a half since then only made the Playoffs twice and never once looked like a serious competitor. True, they have a tough division to play in with the powerhouses from Baltimore and Pittsburgh and a Cincinnati team that's racked up a good playoff run in TheNewTens (albeit with their own EveryYearTheyFizzleOut problems)[[note]]Cincy's five straight playoff berths from 2011-15 have resulted in five straight Wild Card losses[[/note]], but tell anybody from the 1950s and 1960s what the Browns would turn into and they would look at you as if you'd declared to be the king of China.
30th Apr '16 11:28:12 AM BigBertha
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Being the first player taken in the draft is hit and miss whenever it comes to greatness. The MLB produced hall of fame talent in Chipper Jones and Ken Griffey Jr., but also Brien Taylor and Steve Chilcott (neither of whom ever reached the Majors). The NFL spawned many greats like Chuck Bednarik, Creator/PeytonManning, and Bruce Smith; but also notorious busts in Jamarcus Russell, King Hill, and Steve Emtman. The NBA gave us Shaq, Tim Duncan, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; but also Kwame Brown and Larue Martin.
23rd Apr '16 1:55:47 PM BigBertha
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is the stereotype of a draft bust: a highly-hyped player gets drafted in the first round, yet he never lives up to his full potential. Either the player is a complete non-factor, keeps getting into trouble off the field, or struggles as a starter.

to:

* This is the stereotype of a draft bust: a highly-hyped player gets drafted in the first round, yet he never lives up to his full potential. Either the player is a complete non-factor, gets seriously injured, keeps getting into trouble off the field, or struggles as a starter.
This list shows the last 10 events of 71. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.Sports