History DeaderThanDisco / NewMedia

10th Feb '16 9:08:52 PM dinohunterpat
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Bob himself has been gradually falling into irrelevancy recently. For much of mid to late 2000s, he was a well-liked internet personality who was gaining good traction and becoming more and more popular. Starting out with a channel on YouTube in 2006, he moved to ScrewAttack before joining The Escapist with two well-regarded shows. However, Bob began losing traction as time went on with many of his viewers leaving because of his oft-controversial opinions on geek culture. In 2010, he praised ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' (a highly divisive game) as superior to the well-loved ''[[VideoGame/MetroidPrime Prime]]'' trilogy just because the ''Prime'' games [[BiasSteamroller were FPSs and thus inherently inferior games]]. He would later repeat his preachy behavior when he delivered four separate videos aimed at bashing anyone supporting the "Retake Mass Effect" movement, even though he admitted he'd [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch never actually played the games]]. Furthermore, many of his videos were filled with blatant {{Take That}}s at fans who liked works that he hates while expressing blind NostalgiaFilter and SoapBoxSadie views. Naturally, these [[{{Anvilicious}} heavy-handed]] [[AuthorFilibuster message pieces]] turned off many of his fans. Even fans who support Bob's views that [[StopBeingStereotypical Gamer and Geek culture needs improvement]], feel that his attitude is [[DontShootTheMessage overshadowing his legitimate points and thus doing more harm than good]].\\
to:
** Bob himself has been gradually falling into irrelevancy in popularity recently. For much of mid to late 2000s, he was a well-liked internet personality who was gaining good traction and becoming more and more popular. Starting out with a channel on YouTube in 2006, he moved to ScrewAttack before joining The Escapist with two well-regarded shows. shows and a weekly column. However, Bob began losing traction as time went on with many of his viewers leaving because of his oft-controversial opinions on geek pop culture. In 2010, he praised ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' (a highly divisive game) as superior to the well-loved ''[[VideoGame/MetroidPrime Prime]]'' trilogy just because the ''Prime'' games [[BiasSteamroller were FPSs and thus inherently inferior games]]. He would later repeat his preachy behavior when he delivered four separate videos aimed at bashing anyone supporting the "Retake Mass Effect" movement, even though he admitted he'd [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch never actually played the games]]. Furthermore, many of his videos were filled with blatant {{Take That}}s at fans who liked works that he hates while expressing blind NostalgiaFilter and NostalgiaFilter, SoapBoxSadie views. views, and blatant [[FanHater jabs at fans of works he hates]]. Naturally, these [[{{Anvilicious}} heavy-handed]] [[AuthorFilibuster message pieces]] messages]] turned off many of his fans. Even fans people who support share Bob's views that tastes and support his calls to [[StopBeingStereotypical Gamer and Geek culture needs improvement]], improve nerd culture]] feel that his attitude is harsh approach [[DontShootTheMessage overshadowing drowns out his legitimate points and thus is doing more harm than good]].\\

Eventually Bob lost his job at The Escapist and he went back to ScrewAttack, although the site's crew made it explicitly known they just host Bob and donít share his viewpoints. Combined with his real-life abrasive personality, Bob's association with controversial figures, and the evolving landscape of the online gaming personality, Bob has come to be seen as a relic of the past. While he still does have a following, the fanbase isn't substantially large and is accompanied by a growing {{Hatedom}}. He's doing especially bad in comparison to other personalities such as Total Biscuit, the similar in style Jim Sterling, and his former co-worker Yahtzee.
to:
Eventually Bob lost his job at The Escapist and he went back to ScrewAttack, although the site's crew made it explicitly known they just host Bob and donít share his viewpoints. Combined with his real-life abrasive personality, Bob's association with controversial figures, and the evolving landscape of the online gaming personality, Bob has come to be seen as a relic of the past. While he still does have a following, the fanbase isn't substantially large and is accompanied by a growing {{Hatedom}}. He's doing {{Hatedom}} especially bad in comparison compared to other personalities such as Total Biscuit, the similar in style Jim Sterling, and his former co-worker co-workers Jim Sterling and Yahtzee.
10th Feb '16 6:18:16 PM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Website/LiveJournal was a more 'intellectual' alternative to [=MySpace=], and was probably the first blogging platform to become a household name online. It was known for two communities: teenagers who used the site to vent about their problems, and fanfiction writers and [[JournalRoleplay roleplayers]] who used it to publish their material. However, competition from Facebook in the early '10s drew away much of its teenage userbase, while the site's [[{{Bowdlerise}} strict policing of 'objectionable content']] drove the fandom and roleplaying communities to Tumblr and dedicated roleplaying sites. While it remains [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff extraordinary popular in Russia]], having become the primary blogging platform in that country and enjoying a partnership with the news website Gazeta.ru, its English-language side has essentially dissipated, with only a few notable blogs still using the service and most of its status having been supplanted by Tumblr.
to:
** Website/LiveJournal was a more 'intellectual' alternative to [=MySpace=], and was probably the first blogging platform to become a household name online. It was known for two communities: teenagers who used the site to vent about their problems, and fanfiction writers and [[JournalRoleplay roleplayers]] who used it to publish their material. However, competition from Facebook in the early '10s drew away much of its teenage userbase, while the site's [[{{Bowdlerise}} increasingly strict policing of 'objectionable content']] drove the fandom and roleplaying communities to Tumblr Website/{{Tumblr}} and dedicated roleplaying sites. While it remains [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff extraordinary popular in Russia]], having become the primary blogging platform in that country and enjoying a partnership with the news website Gazeta.ru, its English-language side has essentially dissipated, with only a few notable blogs still using the service and most of its status having been supplanted by Tumblr.
9th Feb '16 5:56:34 AM Prinzenick
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In the mid-2000s with the rise of Youtube, Sped Up or "Chipmunked" videos were once a hugely popular way of taking a well known video or movie and making them sound or look ridiculous by just plopping them into windows movie maker and added the speed up effect to the clips for comic effect, with the default pitch raise of the option being an added bonus. Predictably, the novelty of the fad wore out its welcome in a hurry due to overuse, and its use is now seen as annoying instead of funny. It's quite hard to find examples of it being used in contemporary works.
to:
* In the mid-2000s with the rise of Youtube, Sped Up or "Chipmunked" videos were once a hugely popular way of taking a well known video or movie and making them sound or look ridiculous by just plopping them into windows movie maker and added adding the speed up effect to the clips for comic effect, with the default pitch raise of the option being an added bonus. Predictably, the novelty of the fad wore out its welcome in a hurry due to overuse, and its use is now seen as annoying instead of funny. It's quite hard to find examples of it being used in contemporary works. That later editions of Windows Movie Maker fixed the speed up option so that it doesn't raise the pitch helped put a damper on this fad too.
9th Feb '16 5:54:32 AM Prinzenick
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* In the mid-2000s with the rise of Youtube, Sped Up or "Chipmunked" videos were once a hugely popular way of taking a well known video or movie and making them sound or look ridiculous by just plopping them into windows movie maker and added the speed up effect to the clips for comic effect, with the default pitch raise of the option being an added bonus. Predictably, the novelty of the fad wore out its welcome in a hurry due to overuse, and its use is now seen as annoying instead of funny. It's quite hard to find examples of it being used in contemporary works.
6th Feb '16 2:38:01 PM Korodzik
Is there an issue? Send a Message
duplicate
* {{Website/LiveJournal}} has lost its popularity for many reasons. Facebook and Tumblr have taken away a lot of its audience. The admins have a reputation for being overzealous at taking down content. There are several imitations, like Dreamwidth. Averted in Russia, where Livejournal is the most popular blogging platform.
5th Feb '16 9:33:00 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Friendster was the first to go through this process, losing most of its Western userbase to Website/{{Myspace}} in 2004-05. It has since been considered one of the defining examples of a fallen social network, subjected to AnyoneRememberPogs-style [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mFJdOsjJ0k jokes]] by ''Website/TheOnion''. Cushioning its fall, though, was the fact that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it stayed popular in southeast Asia]], where it evolved into a social gaming site that lasted until 2015. ** Website/{{Myspace}}, the site that dethroned Friendster, went the same way due to competition from, and attempts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit catch up with]], Website/{{Facebook}}, which bit into its market share in the late '00s. The site eventually reinvented itself, but it's a pale shadow of what it once was, remembered mainly by '00s kids for its population of {{emo teen}}s and pages filled with garish graphics and music.
to:
** Friendster was the first to go through this process, losing most of its Western userbase to Website/{{Myspace}} Website/MySpace in 2004-05. It has since been considered one of the defining examples of a fallen social network, subjected to AnyoneRememberPogs-style [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mFJdOsjJ0k jokes]] by ''Website/TheOnion''. Cushioning its fall, though, was the fact that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it stayed popular in southeast Asia]], where it evolved into a social gaming site that lasted until 2015. ** Website/{{Myspace}}, Website/MySpace, the site that dethroned Friendster, went the same way due to competition from, and attempts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit catch up with]], Website/{{Facebook}}, which bit into its market share in the late '00s. The site eventually reinvented itself, but it's a pale shadow of what it once was, remembered mainly by '00s kids for its population of {{emo teen}}s and pages filled with garish graphics and music.music. ** Website/LiveJournal was a more 'intellectual' alternative to [=MySpace=], and was probably the first blogging platform to become a household name online. It was known for two communities: teenagers who used the site to vent about their problems, and fanfiction writers and [[JournalRoleplay roleplayers]] who used it to publish their material. However, competition from Facebook in the early '10s drew away much of its teenage userbase, while the site's [[{{Bowdlerise}} strict policing of 'objectionable content']] drove the fandom and roleplaying communities to Tumblr and dedicated roleplaying sites. While it remains [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff extraordinary popular in Russia]], having become the primary blogging platform in that country and enjoying a partnership with the news website Gazeta.ru, its English-language side has essentially dissipated, with only a few notable blogs still using the service and most of its status having been supplanted by Tumblr.
5th Feb '16 9:01:36 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Any number of older {{friending network}}s. Friendster is considered one of the defining examples of a fallen social network (although [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it stayed popular in southeast Asia]] and evolved into a social gaming site), and Website/{{Myspace}} has gone the same way due to competition from (and attempts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit catch up with]]) Website/{{Facebook}}. ** One could make an argument for Google+. Introduced as a rival to Facebook (probably because Google couldn't buy out Facebook like it did with Youtube), it took off at the start and was quickly labeled a potential "Facebook killer", similar to how Gmail essentially blew out all free email services and Google Maps overtook Mapquest in the past. That never happened. Google was unable to attract much beyond the Google faithful or people who wanted a Facebook alternative that wasn't Tumblr, Twitter, or Myspace. Everyone who wanted a G+ account got one and growth stalled. HypeBacklash came in the form of forcing Youtube accounts to be Google+ accounts, and Youtube ended up being flooded with comments hating the decision. That decision was eventually reversed, and G+ hasn't recovered since (the manager responsible for the heavy handedness has since left Google).
to:
* Any number of older {{friending network}}s. network}}s. ** Friendster is was the first to go through this process, losing most of its Western userbase to Website/{{Myspace}} in 2004-05. It has since been considered one of the defining examples of a fallen social network (although network, subjected to AnyoneRememberPogs-style [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mFJdOsjJ0k jokes]] by ''Website/TheOnion''. Cushioning its fall, though, was the fact that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it stayed popular in southeast Asia]] and Asia]], where it evolved into a social gaming site), and Website/{{Myspace}} has gone site that lasted until 2015. ** Website/{{Myspace}}, the site that dethroned Friendster, went the same way due to competition from (and from, and attempts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit catch up with]]) Website/{{Facebook}}. ** One could make an argument with]], Website/{{Facebook}}, which bit into its market share in the late '00s. The site eventually reinvented itself, but it's a pale shadow of what it once was, remembered mainly by '00s kids for Google+. Introduced its population of {{emo teen}}s and pages filled with garish graphics and music. ** Google+ was introduced as a rival to Facebook (probably because Google couldn't buy out Facebook like it did with Youtube), Website/YouTube), and it took off at the start initially and was quickly labeled a potential "Facebook killer", similar to how Gmail essentially blew out all other free email services and Google Maps overtook Mapquest in the past. That never happened. Google was unable to attract much beyond the Google faithful or faithful, as most people who wanted a Facebook alternative that wasn't Tumblr, Twitter, migrated to Website/{{Tumblr}} or Myspace. Website/{{Twitter}} instead. Everyone who wanted a G+ account got one one, and growth stalled. HypeBacklash came in the form of forcing Youtube [=YouTube=] accounts to be Google+ accounts, and Youtube [=YouTube=] ended up being flooded with comments hating the decision. That decision was eventually reversed, and G+ hasn't recovered since (the manager responsible for the heavy handedness heavy-handedness has since left Google).
5th Feb '16 8:45:05 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* File-sharing for music, at least in its more legally grey forms, has died a slow death. Once legal, inexpensive alternatives like Website/YouTube, iTunes, Pandora, and Spotify emerged, most listeners realized that they no longer had to put up with mislabeled files that might possibly be packed with viruses or get them a visit from the authorities, and readily took advantage of these new services. Today, the golden age of file-sharing is definitely in the past. This process is now affecting file-sharing for TV and film thanks to the rise of services like Creator/{{Netflix}}, Creator/{{Hulu}}, Creator/{{HBO}} Go, Crunchyroll, and Creator/{{Amazon}}, while UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, Website/GOGDotCom, and proprietary services like Creator/ElectronicArts' Origin and Creator/{{Ubisoft}}'s Uplay are doing the same for PC games. (Ironically, a lot of these services use peer-to-peer to distribute files efficiently.) These services have been so successful that they've not only relegated piracy to the fringes, they've also made physical copies of music, movies and games obsolete.\\\
to:
* File-sharing for music, at least in its more legally grey forms, has died a slow death. Once legal, inexpensive alternatives like Website/YouTube, iTunes, Pandora, and Spotify emerged, most listeners realized that they no longer had to put up with mislabeled files that might possibly be packed with viruses or get them a visit from the authorities, and readily took advantage of these new services. Today, the golden age of file-sharing is definitely well in the past.past, with services like Napster, Kazaa, and [=LimeWire=] remembered mostly by the now grown-up children of the '00s. This process is now affecting file-sharing for TV and film thanks to the rise of services like Creator/{{Netflix}}, Creator/{{Hulu}}, Creator/{{HBO}} Go, Crunchyroll, and Creator/{{Amazon}}, while UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, Website/GOGDotCom, and proprietary services like Creator/ElectronicArts' Origin and Creator/{{Ubisoft}}'s Uplay are doing the same for PC games. (Ironically, a lot of these services use peer-to-peer to distribute files efficiently.) These services have been so successful that they've not only relegated piracy to the fringes, they've also made started to make physical copies of music, movies movies, and games obsolete.\\\
5th Feb '16 8:37:22 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* File-sharing for music, at least in its more legally grey forms, has died a slow death. Once legal, inexpensive alternatives like Website/YouTube, iTunes, Pandora, and Spotify emerged, most listeners realized that they no longer had to put up with mislabeled files that might possibly be packed with viruses or get them a visit from the authorities, and readily took advantage of these new services. Today, there are still a few people who use file-sharing for moral/ethical reasons (mainly out of opposition to IP laws, UsefulNotes/{{DRM}}, and the media companies that support them), or for the more legitimate use of distributing large files (such as Linux [=ISOs=] and Creative Commons video), but beyond them, the golden age of file-sharing is definitely in the past. This process is now affecting file-sharing for TV and film thanks to the rise of services like Creator/{{Netflix}}, Creator/{{Hulu}}, Creator/{{HBO}} Go, Crunchyroll, and Creator/{{Amazon}}, while UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, Website/GOGDotCom, and proprietary services like Creator/ElectronicArts' Origin and Creator/{{Ubisoft}}'s Uplay are doing the same for PC games. Ironically, a lot of these services use peer-to-peer to distribute files efficiently. These services have been so successful that they've not only relegated piracy to the fringes, they've also made physical copies of music, movies and games obsolete. ** File-sharing is still common outside the US, however. While Americans may be blessed with countless streaming options, many of them suffer from regional restrictions and delays in other countries. The prevalence of NoExportForYou means that file-sharing isn't ''quite'' ready to die out elsewhere.
to:
* File-sharing for music, at least in its more legally grey forms, has died a slow death. Once legal, inexpensive alternatives like Website/YouTube, iTunes, Pandora, and Spotify emerged, most listeners realized that they no longer had to put up with mislabeled files that might possibly be packed with viruses or get them a visit from the authorities, and readily took advantage of these new services. Today, there are still a few people who use file-sharing for moral/ethical reasons (mainly out of opposition to IP laws, UsefulNotes/{{DRM}}, and the media companies that support them), or for the more legitimate use of distributing large files (such as Linux [=ISOs=] and Creative Commons video), but beyond them, the golden age of file-sharing is definitely in the past. This process is now affecting file-sharing for TV and film thanks to the rise of services like Creator/{{Netflix}}, Creator/{{Hulu}}, Creator/{{HBO}} Go, Crunchyroll, and Creator/{{Amazon}}, while UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, Website/GOGDotCom, and proprietary services like Creator/ElectronicArts' Origin and Creator/{{Ubisoft}}'s Uplay are doing the same for PC games. Ironically, (Ironically, a lot of these services use peer-to-peer to distribute files efficiently. efficiently.) These services have been so successful that they've not only relegated piracy to the fringes, they've also made physical copies of music, movies and games obsolete. ** obsolete.\\\ File-sharing is does still enjoy a few niches, however. It's still common outside the US, however. While for instance, as the streaming services that Americans may be are blessed with countless streaming options, many of them often suffer from regional restrictions and delays in other countries. Even within the US, some shows and films not only haven't been released on home video or VOD, they likely won't be for a long time (if ever) due to licensing issues or simple lack of demand; this is especially common for fans of anime. The prevalence of tropes like NoExportForYou and KeepCirculatingTheTapes means that file-sharing isn't ''quite'' ready to die out elsewhere.entirely. There are also those who use file-sharing for moral/ethical reasons (mainly out of opposition to IP laws, UsefulNotes/{{DRM}}, and the media companies that support them), or for the more legitimate use of distributing large files (such as Linux [=ISOs=] and Creative Commons video).
4th Feb '16 2:48:12 PM harryhenry
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The "feud" with Total Biscuit had nothing to do with him beign let go from the escapist
Eventually Bob lost his job at The Escapist after a feud with Total Biscuit and he went back to ScrewAttack, although the site's crew made it explicitly known they just host Bob and donít share his viewpoints. Combined with his real-life abrasive personality, Bob's association with controversial figures, and the evolving landscape of the online gaming personality, Bob has come to be seen as a relic of the past. While he still does have a following, the fanbase isn't substantially large and is accompanied by a growing {{Hatedom}}. He's doing especially bad in comparison to other personalities such as Total Biscuit, the similar in style Jim Sterling, and his former co-worker Yahtzee.
to:
Eventually Bob lost his job at The Escapist after a feud with Total Biscuit and he went back to ScrewAttack, although the site's crew made it explicitly known they just host Bob and donít share his viewpoints. Combined with his real-life abrasive personality, Bob's association with controversial figures, and the evolving landscape of the online gaming personality, Bob has come to be seen as a relic of the past. While he still does have a following, the fanbase isn't substantially large and is accompanied by a growing {{Hatedom}}. He's doing especially bad in comparison to other personalities such as Total Biscuit, the similar in style Jim Sterling, and his former co-worker Yahtzee.
This list shows the last 10 events of 296. Show all.