History DeaderThanDisco / LiveActionTV

24th Sep '16 4:37:36 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* The UrExample for television may be TV personality [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Godfrey Arthur Godfrey]]. Having started in radio in the '30s, he rose to become Creator/{{CBS}}' morning radio host in 1945 and eventually moved on to their television network, with his shows becoming extraordinarily popular in the late '40s and early '50s. Viewers turned against him after the "[=LaRosa=] incident", which revealed that, [[NiceCharacterMeanActor behind his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor]], Godfrey was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]]. In 1953, he fired Julius [=LaRosa=], a popular singer on one of his shows, ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need. The fact that a number of people behind the scenes suspected that the real reason was because Godfrey was jealous of [=LaRosa=]'s rising star only made the matter worse, as did an interview days later where Godfrey claimed that [=LaRosa=] had "no humility" (a charge that many were quick to [[{{Hypocrite}} spin around and tag on Godfrey himself]]) and additional firings over the next several years. While he still had a small number of diehard fans as TheFifties went on, enough to keep his show ''Talent Scouts'' on the air until 1958, afterwards he was relegated to a footnote of early television history, remembered nowadays mainly for loosely inspiring the films ''The Great Man'' and ''Film/AFaceInTheCrowd''.

to:

* The UrExample for television may be TV personality [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Godfrey Arthur Godfrey]]. Having started in radio in the '30s, he rose to become Creator/{{CBS}}' morning radio host in 1945 and eventually moved on to their young television network, with his shows becoming extraordinarily popular in the late '40s and early '50s. Viewers However, viewers turned against him after the "[=LaRosa=] "La Rosa incident", which revealed that, [[NiceCharacterMeanActor behind his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor]], Godfrey was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]]. In 1953, he fired Julius [=LaRosa=], La Rosa, a popular singer on one of his shows, ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need. The fact that a number of people behind the scenes suspected that [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6s75wpdiri8 the real reason reason]] was because Godfrey felt threatened by La Rosa's rise to stardom in his own right (he was jealous of [=LaRosa=]'s rising star receiving more fan mail than Godfrey was, and had put out two hit records by then) only made the matter worse, as did an interview days later where Godfrey claimed that [=LaRosa=] La Rosa had "no humility" (a charge that many were quick to [[{{Hypocrite}} spin around and tag on Godfrey himself]]) and additional firings over the next several years. While he still had a small number of diehard fans as TheFifties went on, enough to keep his show ''Talent Scouts'' on the air until 1958, afterwards he was relegated to a footnote of early television history, remembered nowadays mainly for loosely inspiring the films ''The Great Man'' and ''Film/AFaceInTheCrowd''.
24th Sep '16 2:33:20 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Series/HomeImprovement'', as detailed in [[http://www.avclub.com/article/why-has-time-forsaken-home-improvement-242973 this article]] by Sean O'Neal of ''The A.V. Club''. In its original 1991-99 run, the show made Creator/TimAllen a star, lines like "more power!" (it's even the TropeNamer for TimTaylorTechnology) and Allen's trademark grunts became memes, it received a video game adaptation, and it frequently scored higher ratings than ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', ''Series/{{Friends}}'', ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'', and other hit sitcoms that are now remembered as classics of '90s television. It was still a massive hit by the time it went off the air, which occurred because Allen himself decided to end the show; he and his co-star Patricia Richardson turned down respective $50 million and $25 million contracts to return for a ninth season. First Lady UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton even considered doing an appearance on the show. However, after it ended, it vanished from reruns and popular culture, with most of its stars besides Allen dropping out of the limelight, not even being rediscovered during the 2010s' wave of '90s nostalgia that allowed shows like ''Series/FullHouse'' to find a new audience. A big reason why has to do with the fact that the show's humor, setup, and characters were, by and large, StrictlyFormula; it was a show about a BumblingDad, his nagging wife, and obnoxious kids that ran on PG-rated cornball humor that would play in Peoria, doing things that had been sitcom staples for decades without putting much of any sort of twist on them. Furthermore, Allen's later sitcom ''Series/LastManStanding'' was basically a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Home Improvement'' in many ways, meaning that people who wanted to watch him on TV could do so on a new series. Talk of a reunion has mostly gone nowhere.

to:

* ''Series/HomeImprovement'', as detailed in [[http://www.avclub.com/article/why-has-time-forsaken-home-improvement-242973 this article]] by Sean O'Neal of ''The A.V. Club''. In its original 1991-99 run, the show made Creator/TimAllen a star, lines like "more power!" (it's even the TropeNamer for TimTaylorTechnology) and Allen's trademark grunts became memes, it received a video game adaptation, and it frequently scored higher ratings than ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', ''Series/{{Friends}}'', ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'', and other hit sitcoms that are now remembered as classics of '90s television. It was still a massive hit by the time it went off the air, which occurred because Allen himself decided to end the show; he and his co-star Patricia Richardson turned down respective $50 million and $25 million contracts to return for a ninth season. First Lady UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton even considered doing an appearance on the show. However, after it ended, it vanished from reruns and popular culture, with most of its stars besides Allen dropping out of the limelight, not even being rediscovered during the 2010s' wave of '90s nostalgia that allowed shows like ''Series/FullHouse'' to find a new audience. A big reason why has to do with the fact that the show's humor, setup, and characters were, by and large, StrictlyFormula; aside from its AffectionateParody of [[TestosteronePoisoning middle-aged suburbanite machismo]], it was a show about a BumblingDad, his nagging wife, and obnoxious kids that ran on PG-rated cornball humor that would play in Peoria, doing things that had been sitcom staples for decades without putting much of any sort of twist on them. Furthermore, Allen's later sitcom ''Series/LastManStanding'' was basically a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Home Improvement'' in many ways, meaning that people who wanted to watch him on TV could do so on a new series. Talk of a reunion has mostly gone nowhere.






* The UrExample for television may be TV personality Arthur Godfrey, who was extraordinarily popular in [[TheFifties the early 1950s]]. Viewers turned against him after his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor was [[NiceCharacterMeanActor shown to have been an act]]; he was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]], who fired a popular singer on one of his shows ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need.


Added DiffLines:

* The UrExample for television may be TV personality [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Godfrey Arthur Godfrey]]. Having started in radio in the '30s, he rose to become Creator/{{CBS}}' morning radio host in 1945 and eventually moved on to their television network, with his shows becoming extraordinarily popular in the late '40s and early '50s. Viewers turned against him after the "[=LaRosa=] incident", which revealed that, [[NiceCharacterMeanActor behind his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor]], Godfrey was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]]. In 1953, he fired Julius [=LaRosa=], a popular singer on one of his shows, ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need. The fact that a number of people behind the scenes suspected that the real reason was because Godfrey was jealous of [=LaRosa=]'s rising star only made the matter worse, as did an interview days later where Godfrey claimed that [=LaRosa=] had "no humility" (a charge that many were quick to [[{{Hypocrite}} spin around and tag on Godfrey himself]]) and additional firings over the next several years. While he still had a small number of diehard fans as TheFifties went on, enough to keep his show ''Talent Scouts'' on the air until 1958, afterwards he was relegated to a footnote of early television history, remembered nowadays mainly for loosely inspiring the films ''The Great Man'' and ''Film/AFaceInTheCrowd''.
23rd Sep '16 8:24:55 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Series/LittleBritain'' was a hit at the TurnOfTheMillennium for its of-the-moment satire of British life, colorful {{catchphrase}}-driven characters, and lowbrow shock-driven humor; it was so popular that a live tour combining reenacted sketches and new pieces was a success as well. However, keeping up its momentum was tough; by Series 3 the established characters and running gags had worn themselves into the ground, the new characters seemed to have no purpose except shock value, and the show and its actors were now so overexposed and overmarketed that audiences were sick of them. Combine that with a critical backlash against traditional British comedy shows with the success of ''The Office'' and Ricky Gervais, and its days were numbered. The total flop of the retooled Series 4 (''Little Britain USA'', co-produced with HBO) was the last nail in the coffin. In addition, it didn't age well; its constant pokes at minority groups were controversial enough at the time and are now completely outdated. If you ask any teenager who didn't watch it when they were younger, chances are they don't know it; if you ask someone who grew up with it, chances are they regret it. While its leads/creators David Walliams and Matt Lucas have gone on to other successes (the former as a children's author, the latter as an actor in a variety of productions), ''Little Britain'' is just a relic of its time.
* ''Series/DeadRingers'' -- As this sketch comedy show drew upon current events and then-popular celebrities and politicians, each series became this a short time after airing. The BBC knew it too; they only released the first series on DVD, despite there being seven produced in total. The radio series fared better, as it was often based on radio shows and pop culture that were still around years later (hence most series are available on CD or cassette) and did not require you to suspend your disbelief from the impressionists not looking like who they were meant to be. However, the "satirical impression" aspect of the show is a dead trope in itself -- people are more likely to watch stand-up comedy or read internet articles for the same jokes, without the tacky concept. However, the series is still beloved among those who watched the similar TV series ''Series/SpittingImage'' (which predated ''Dead Ringers'' by more than a decade).

to:

* ''Series/LittleBritain'' was a hit at the TurnOfTheMillennium for its of-the-moment satire of British life, colorful {{catchphrase}}-driven characters, and lowbrow lowbrow, shock-driven humor; it humor. It was so popular enough that a live tour combining reenacted sketches and new pieces was a success as well. However, keeping up its momentum was tough; by tough. By Series 3 3, the established characters and running gags had worn themselves into the ground, the new characters seemed to have no purpose except shock value, and the show and its actors were now so overexposed and overmarketed that audiences were sick of them. Combine that with a critical backlash against the traditional British comedy shows BritCom format with the success of ''The Office'' ''Series/TheOfficeUK'' and Ricky Gervais, Creator/RickyGervais, and its days were numbered. The total flop of the retooled Series 4 (''Little Britain USA'', co-produced with HBO) Creator/{{HBO}}) was the last nail in the coffin. In addition, it didn't age well; its constant pokes at minority groups were controversial enough even at the time time, and are now completely outdated. seen as [[ValuesDissonance outright cringeworthy]]. If you ask any teenager who didn't watch it when they were younger, chances are they don't know it; about it, and if you ask someone who grew ''did'' grow up with it, chances are they regret it. While its leads/creators David Walliams and Matt Lucas have gone on to other successes (the former as a children's author, the latter as an actor in a variety of productions), ''Little Britain'' is just a relic of its time.
* ''Series/DeadRingers'' -- ''Series/DeadRingers''. As this sketch comedy show drew upon current events and then-popular celebrities and politicians, each series became this a short time after airing. The BBC knew it it, too; they only released the first series on DVD, despite there being seven produced in total. The radio series fared better, as it was often based on radio shows and pop culture that were still around years later (hence most series are available on CD or cassette) and did not require you to suspend your disbelief from the impressionists not looking like who they were meant to be. However, the "satirical impression" aspect of the show is a dead trope in itself -- people are more likely to watch stand-up comedy or read internet articles for the same jokes, without the tacky concept. However, the series is still beloved among those who watched the similar TV series ''Series/SpittingImage'' (which predated ''Dead Ringers'' by more than a decade).
23rd Sep '16 8:19:06 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' was an absolute landmark in the GameShow industry at the TurnOfTheMillennium. At the time, the game show industry was still suffering from the fallout of TheNineties brought on by a glut of bad revivals and cheap, mostly forgettable cable shows. The only shows with any signs of life were ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' on Creator/{{CBS}}, plus ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' and ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' in syndication. ABC was lagging in third place among the Big Three at the time, but once ''Millionaire'' hit the airwaves, things turned around quickly: at its height, it aired five nights a week in primetime, and quickly gained fame for its [[SceneryPorn dramatic lighting and music]] (faithfully adapted from the original British version), the interplay of host Regis Philbin with the contestants, and the fact that it was the first network game show to offer a $1,000,000 top prize. The show codified new game show tropes as denoted by WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire: things such as {{lifelines}}, dramatic sets, and minimalistic formats with ridiculously high-budget payoffs. Its {{catch phrase}}s, "Is that your final answer?" and "I'd like to phone a friend", entered common parlance. Many new game shows came out copying it to varying extents, such as ''Series/{{Greed}}'', ''Series/TheWeakestLink'' (also an adaptation of a British game show, to the point that both versions had the same host), ''Series/WinningLines'', ''Series/ItsYourChanceOfALifetime'', and a revival of the classic fifties quizzer ''Series/TwentyOne'' -- none of which lasted particularly long. ''Millionaire'' also received a massive amount of international adaptations. However, with the show falling to ABC's WolverinePublicity and airing five nights a week, combined with the glut of copycats, ''Millionaire'' did not rule the roost for long. The fall from grace was abrupt, with ''Millionaire'' leaving ABC's lineup in 2002; however, a syndicated, half-hour adaptation quickly began, with Meredith Vieira as host. The syndicated version has managed to limp along ever since, but it began to show signs of desperation in 2008 when the format was tweaked: first, by adding a timer to questions and changing the lifelines (in part because "Phone a Friend" had devolved to "Phone Someone Who Can Website/{{Google}} the Answer"). Another format change ensued in 2010 with the addition of question shuffling and further tweaks to the question format. But all of the changes seemed to do little more than cause the show to hemmorhage viewers. In further desperation, the producers swapped out Meredith for three different hosts in three seasons: Cedric the Entertainer, Terry Crews, and Chris Harrison. The Sony e-mail hacks revealed that the show was nearly axed after the 2014-15 season because of how far it had fallen from grace. Nowadays, most people would be surprised to find that ''Millionaire'' is even on the air anymore, even though there was a time when it was literally the biggest game show in the world, and one credited with revitalizing a long-struggling genre.

to:

* ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' was an absolute landmark in the GameShow industry at the TurnOfTheMillennium. At the time, the game show industry was still suffering from the fallout of TheNineties brought on by a glut of bad revivals and cheap, mostly forgettable cable shows. The only shows with any signs of life were ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' on Creator/{{CBS}}, plus ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' and ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' in syndication. ABC was lagging in third place among the Big Three at the time, but once ''Millionaire'' hit the airwaves, things turned around quickly: at its height, it aired five nights a week in primetime, and quickly gained fame for its [[SceneryPorn dramatic lighting and music]] (faithfully adapted from the original British version), the interplay of host Regis Philbin with the contestants, and the fact that it was the first network game show to offer a $1,000,000 top prize. The show codified new game show tropes as denoted by WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire: things such as {{lifelines}}, dramatic sets, and minimalistic formats with ridiculously high-budget payoffs. Its {{catch phrase}}s, "Is that your final answer?" and "I'd like to phone a friend", entered common parlance. Many new game shows came out copying it to varying extents, such as ''Series/{{Greed}}'', ''Series/TheWeakestLink'' (also an adaptation of a British game show, to the point that both versions had the same host), ''Series/WinningLines'', ''Series/ItsYourChanceOfALifetime'', and a revival of the classic fifties quizzer ''Series/TwentyOne'' -- none of which lasted particularly long. ''Millionaire'' also received a massive amount of international adaptations. \\\
However, with the show falling to ABC's WolverinePublicity and airing five nights a week, combined with the glut of copycats, ''Millionaire'' did not rule the roost for long. The fall from grace was abrupt, with ''Millionaire'' leaving ABC's lineup in 2002; however, a syndicated, half-hour adaptation quickly began, with Meredith Vieira as host. The syndicated version has managed to limp along ever since, but it began to show signs of desperation in 2008 when the format was tweaked: first, by adding a timer to questions and changing the lifelines (in part because "Phone a Friend" had devolved to "Phone Someone Who Can Website/{{Google}} the Answer"). Another format change ensued in 2010 with the addition of question shuffling and further tweaks to the question format. But all of the changes seemed to do little more than cause the show to hemmorhage viewers. In further desperation, the producers swapped out Meredith for three different hosts in three seasons: Cedric the Entertainer, Terry Crews, and Chris Harrison. The Sony e-mail hacks revealed that the show was nearly axed after the 2014-15 season because of how far it had fallen from grace. Nowadays, most people would be surprised to find that ''Millionaire'' is even on the air anymore, even though there was a time when it was literally the biggest game show in the world, and one credited with revitalizing a long-struggling genre.
* ''Series/HomeImprovement'', as detailed in [[http://www.avclub.com/article/why-has-time-forsaken-home-improvement-242973 this article]] by Sean O'Neal of ''The A.V. Club''. In its original 1991-99 run, the show made Creator/TimAllen a star, lines like "more power!" (it's even the TropeNamer for TimTaylorTechnology) and Allen's trademark grunts became memes, it received a video game adaptation, and it frequently scored higher ratings than ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', ''Series/{{Friends}}'', ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'', and other hit sitcoms that are now remembered as classics of '90s television. It was still a massive hit by the time it went off the air, which occurred because Allen himself decided to end the show; he and his co-star Patricia Richardson turned down respective $50 million and $25 million contracts to return for a ninth season. First Lady UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton even considered doing an appearance on the show. However, after it ended, it vanished from reruns and popular culture, with most of its stars besides Allen dropping out of the limelight, not even being rediscovered during the 2010s' wave of '90s nostalgia that allowed shows like ''Series/FullHouse'' to find a new audience. A big reason why has to do with the fact that the show's humor, setup, and characters were, by and large, StrictlyFormula; it was a show about a BumblingDad, his nagging wife, and obnoxious kids that ran on PG-rated cornball humor that would play in Peoria, doing things that had been sitcom staples for decades without putting much of any sort of twist on them. Furthermore, Allen's later sitcom ''Series/LastManStanding'' was basically a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Home Improvement'' in many ways, meaning that people who wanted to watch him on TV could do so on a new series. Talk of a reunion has mostly gone nowhere.



* ''Series/LittleBritain'' was a hit at the TurnOfTheMillennium for its of-the-moment satire of British life, colorful {{Catchphrase}}-driven characters, and lowbrow shock-driven humor; it was so popular that a live tour combining reenacted sketches and new pieces was a success as well. However, keeping up its momentum was tough; by Series 3 the established characters and running gags had worn themselves into the ground, the new characters seemed to have no purpose except shock value, and the show and its actors were now so overexposed and overmarketed that audiences were sick of them. Combine that with a critical backlash against traditional British comedy shows with the success of ''The Office'' and Ricky Gervais, and its days were numbered. The total flop of the retooled Series 4 (''Little Britain USA'', co-produced with HBO) was the last nail in the coffin. In addition, it didn't age well; its constant pokes at minority groups were controversial enough at the time and are now completely outdated. If you ask any teenager who didn't watch it when they were younger, chances are they don't know it; if you ask someone who grew up with it, chances are they regret it. While its leads/creators David Walliams and Matt Lucas have gone on to other successes (the former as a children's author, the latter as an actor in a variety of productions), ''Little Britain'' is just a relic of its time.

to:

* ''Series/LittleBritain'' was a hit at the TurnOfTheMillennium for its of-the-moment satire of British life, colorful {{Catchphrase}}-driven {{catchphrase}}-driven characters, and lowbrow shock-driven humor; it was so popular that a live tour combining reenacted sketches and new pieces was a success as well. However, keeping up its momentum was tough; by Series 3 the established characters and running gags had worn themselves into the ground, the new characters seemed to have no purpose except shock value, and the show and its actors were now so overexposed and overmarketed that audiences were sick of them. Combine that with a critical backlash against traditional British comedy shows with the success of ''The Office'' and Ricky Gervais, and its days were numbered. The total flop of the retooled Series 4 (''Little Britain USA'', co-produced with HBO) was the last nail in the coffin. In addition, it didn't age well; its constant pokes at minority groups were controversial enough at the time and are now completely outdated. If you ask any teenager who didn't watch it when they were younger, chances are they don't know it; if you ask someone who grew up with it, chances are they regret it. While its leads/creators David Walliams and Matt Lucas have gone on to other successes (the former as a children's author, the latter as an actor in a variety of productions), ''Little Britain'' is just a relic of its time.
22nd Sep '16 12:07:00 PM Furienna
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* ''Series/ADifferentWorld'' was a top five rated show during its first four seasons, consistently ranked first or second among African American viewers during most of its run, and was one of the rare shows where it's generally agreed that it [[GrowingTheBeard "grew a beard"]] with its second season retool. Despite this, it's hardly ever immediately brought up into the conversation of the "golden age" of NBC's "Must See TV" Thursday night line-up like its parent show ''Series/TheCosbyShow'', ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', and subsequently, ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' and ''Series/{{Friends}}''. To make matters worse, after its lead-in, ''The Cosby Show'' ended its run after eight seasons in 1991-92, ''A Different World'' failed when it inherited the 8:00 p.m. Thursday night timeslot on NBC. To put things into proper perspective, ''A Different World'' went from ranking #17 in the Nielsen's the season prior, to #71 in its sixth and what turned out to be its final season. It was also around this time that Creator/{{Fox}}'s ''Series/{{Martin}}'' debuted on Thursday nights and began to eat up ''A Different World'''s black audience. To date, only the first season of ''A Different World'' has been officially released on DVD (although the entire series was made available on Netflix in 2015). The show's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece/TheNineties topicality]] obviously in retrospect, didn't help (''Series/InLivingColor'' even made fun of it in a skit called "A Different Message") as ''A Different World'' typically addressed issues that were avoided by ''The Cosby Show'' writers (race and class relations, or the Equal Rights Amendment). NBC was especially [[ScrewedByTheNetwork/LiveActionTV unhappy]] with the notion of having the Season 6 premiere center around the then recent Los Angeles Riots. Additionally, ''A Different World'' was credited with increasing African American Interest in HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities). The show is set at Hillman college, a fictional Virgina HBCU loosely based on the real life Hampton and Spellman Universities. At the same time the show began in 1988, the Spike Lee film ''SchoolDaze'' was released. Ultimately, the show reflects an image of the HBCU and the African American college experience that hasn't been relevant since the show was on the air.

to:

* ''Series/ADifferentWorld'' was a top five rated show during its first four seasons, consistently ranked first or second among African American viewers during most of its run, and was one of the rare shows where it's generally agreed that it [[GrowingTheBeard "grew a beard"]] with its second season retool. Despite this, it's hardly ever immediately brought up into the conversation of the "golden age" of NBC's "Must See TV" Thursday night line-up like its parent show ''Series/TheCosbyShow'', ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', and subsequently, ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' and ''Series/{{Friends}}''. To make matters worse, after its lead-in, ''The Cosby Show'' ended its run after eight seasons in 1991-92, ''A Different World'' failed when it inherited the 8:00 p.m. Thursday night timeslot on NBC. To put things into proper perspective, ''A Different World'' went from ranking #17 in the Nielsen's the season prior, to #71 in its sixth and what turned out to be its final season. It was also around this time that Creator/{{Fox}}'s ''Series/{{Martin}}'' debuted on Thursday nights and began to eat up ''A Different World'''s black audience. To date, only the first season of ''A Different World'' has been officially released on DVD (although the entire series was made available on Netflix in 2015). The show's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece/TheNineties topicality]] obviously in retrospect, didn't help (''Series/InLivingColor'' even made fun of it in a skit called "A Different Message") as ''A Different World'' typically addressed issues that were avoided by ''The Cosby Show'' writers (race and class relations, or the Equal Rights Amendment). NBC was especially [[ScrewedByTheNetwork/LiveActionTV unhappy]] with the notion of having the Season 6 premiere center around the then recent Los Angeles Riots. Additionally, ''A Different World'' was credited with increasing African American Interest in HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities). The show is set at Hillman college, a fictional Virgina Virginia HBCU loosely based on the real life Hampton and Spellman Universities. At the same time the show began in 1988, the Spike Lee film ''SchoolDaze'' was released. Ultimately, the show reflects an image of the HBCU and the African American college experience that hasn't been relevant since the show was on the air.
22nd Sep '16 11:42:41 AM Furienna
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* The UrExample for television may be TV personality Arthur Godfrey, who was extraordinarily popular in [[TheFifties the early 1950s]]. Viewers turned against him after his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor was [[NiceCharacterMeanActor shown to have been an act]]; he was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]] who fired a popular singer on one of his shows ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need.

to:

* The UrExample for television may be TV personality Arthur Godfrey, who was extraordinarily popular in [[TheFifties the early 1950s]]. Viewers turned against him after his folksy, friendly, gee-shucks demeanor was [[NiceCharacterMeanActor shown to have been an act]]; he was actually a [[SmallNameBigEgo cruel, egotistical taskmaster]] taskmaster]], who fired a popular singer on one of his shows ''on the air'' for ''going to his grandmother's funeral'' instead of taking a dancing class he didn't actually need.
22nd Sep '16 11:34:39 AM Furienna
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* During the the latter half of the 1990s, ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' was one of the most successful sitcoms on television, ultimately running for nine seasons for a grand total of 233 episodes. Regardless, the series in general has for the most part, been cast aside both in terms of network syndication and DVD sales. And because of music rights, the series can’t even be found on Netflix. To date, only the first season has been officially released to DVD (mainly due to music licensing issues, as several episodes prominently featured musical numbers). In fact, after its initial syndication run on TBS, ION picked it up, and only aired episodes from the first five seasons. Shortly thereafter, The CW aired reruns for a short spell in the late aughts to replace a cancelled block of programming. Several other factors for its dimmed legacy could stem from the argument that ''The Drew Carey Show'' when you get right down to it, wasn't a particularly original, influential or innovative series, or that the character of Mimi Bobeck was an easy target for mockery. Besides Carey himself (who is probably better known these days for hosting ''Series/ThePriceIsRight''), the most prolific writers on the show have done very little since ''The Drew Carey Show'' ended its run, and the only actors who found success afterwards were Creator/DiedrichBader (who made his name in the voice acting industry), Christa Miller (who acted on her husband Bill Lawrence's show ''Scrubs'', which ran for almost as long as ''The Drew Carey Show'') and Craig Ferguson (thanks to his late-night talk show). More to the point, despite its long run, ''The Drew Carey Show'' was never a highly rated series. It peaked at number 13 in its third and fourth seasons, and then plummeted in the ratings. In fact, the only reason there was even a ninth season was because ABC was contractually obligated to air one, which meant that the 26 episode 9th season were burned off over the summer, often two a night.

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* During the the latter half of the 1990s, ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' was one of the most successful sitcoms on television, ultimately running for nine seasons for a grand total of 233 episodes. Regardless, the series in general has for the most part, part been cast aside both in terms of network syndication and DVD sales. And because of music rights, the series can’t even be found on Netflix. To date, only the first season has been officially released to DVD (mainly due to music licensing issues, as several episodes prominently featured musical numbers). In fact, after its initial syndication run on TBS, ION picked it up, and only aired episodes from the first five seasons. Shortly thereafter, The CW aired reruns for a short spell in the late aughts to replace a cancelled block of programming. Several other factors for its dimmed legacy could stem from the argument that ''The Drew Carey Show'' when you get right down to it, wasn't a particularly original, influential or innovative series, or that the character of Mimi Bobeck was an easy target for mockery. Besides Carey himself (who is probably better known these days for hosting ''Series/ThePriceIsRight''), the most prolific writers on the show have done very little since ''The Drew Carey Show'' ended its run, and the only actors who found success afterwards were Creator/DiedrichBader (who made his name in the voice acting industry), Christa Miller (who acted on her husband Bill Lawrence's show ''Scrubs'', which ran for almost as long as ''The Drew Carey Show'') and Craig Ferguson (thanks to his late-night talk show). More to the point, despite its long run, ''The Drew Carey Show'' was never a highly rated series. It peaked at number 13 in its third and fourth seasons, and then plummeted in the ratings. In fact, the only reason there was even a ninth season was because ABC was contractually obligated to air one, which meant that the 26 episode 9th season were burned off over the summer, often two a night.
22nd Sep '16 11:30:58 AM Furienna
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* ''Series/{{Webster}}'' aired for six seasons, the first four on ABC and the last two in first-run syndication for 150 episodes in total. During its original run, it drew a large audience of younger viewers — in fact, ''Webster''[='=]s largest audience was children. Despite all of this, in the years since ''Webster'' went off the air in 1989, it has more or less faded into the background. Creator/{{USA Network}} aired reruns of the show from September 22, 1997 to March 13, 1998. It also aired on Superstation WGN from September 21, 1998 to September 2, 1999 (which was the last time that ''Webster'' appeared on national television until Antenna TV picked up the show in 2015). To date, only the first four seasons have been released on DVD. And while we all know who Emannuel Lewis is, the series itself never really get any real respect except from people who loved it. A huge part of the problem was that ''Webster'' stuck too close to the then-popular ''Series/DiffrentStrokes'' formula and format that it ultimately failed to have an identity of its own besides having a 'cute kid'. But while ''Diff’rent Strokes'' at least originally attempted to be a socially relevant Norman Lear-type sitcom, ''Webster'' was one of those sitcoms made expressly for families with very young children, complete with gentle, mostly saccharine humor and plenty of simple morals at the end of each episode (in a sense, it was a forerunner to ''Series/FullHouse'', which incidentally, replaced ''Webster'' in ABC's Friday night timeslot in the fall of 1987). The series was of course despised by critics, but nevertheless became a top 25 show, making Emmanuel Lewis a star. Also when compared to another '80s {{kidcom}} in the form of ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' (which was always intentionally targeted to kids and therefore knew they were their own show and the demographic it was targeting and didn’t try copying the ''Diff’rent Strokes'' formula), ''Webster'' was more of a traditional sitcom and had adult stories.

to:

* ''Series/{{Webster}}'' aired for six seasons, the first four on ABC and the last two in first-run syndication for 150 episodes in total. During its original run, it drew a large audience of younger viewers — in fact, ''Webster''[='=]s largest audience was children. Despite all of this, in the years since ''Webster'' went off the air in 1989, it has more or less faded into the background. Creator/{{USA Network}} aired reruns of the show from September 22, 1997 to March 13, 1998. It also aired on Superstation WGN from September 21, 1998 to September 2, 1999 (which was the last time that ''Webster'' appeared on national television until Antenna TV picked up the show in 2015). To date, only the first four seasons have been released on DVD. And while we all know who Emannuel Lewis is, the series itself never really get any real respect except from people who loved it. A huge part of the problem was that ''Webster'' stuck too close to the then-popular ''Series/DiffrentStrokes'' formula and format format, that it ultimately failed to have never found an identity of its own besides having a 'cute kid'. But while ''Diff’rent Strokes'' at least originally attempted to be a socially relevant Norman Lear-type sitcom, ''Webster'' was one of those sitcoms made expressly for families with very young children, complete with gentle, mostly saccharine humor and plenty of simple morals at the end of each episode (in a sense, it was a forerunner to ''Series/FullHouse'', which incidentally, replaced ''Webster'' in ABC's Friday night timeslot in the fall of 1987). The series was of course despised by critics, but nevertheless became a top 25 show, making Emmanuel Lewis a star. Also when compared to another '80s {{kidcom}} in the form of ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' (which was always intentionally targeted to kids and therefore knew they were their own show and the demographic it was targeting and didn’t try copying the ''Diff’rent Strokes'' formula), ''Webster'' was more of a traditional sitcom and had adult stories.
22nd Sep '16 11:19:45 AM Furienna
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* A lot of 1960s, '70s and '80s TV action series were built around a cheesy premise, but still (relatively) family-friendly at the same time: ''Series/TheSaint'', ''Series/TheSixMillionDollarMan'', ''Series/KungFu'', ''Series/TheATeam'', and ''Series/CharliesAngels'' here huge in their heyday. This genre seems to have died somewhere in the 2000s as HBO's drama series considerably upped the ante in quality. As a result many of these kinds of cheesy action shows are nowadays directly made into kids' shows, because the makers know they can't reach the adult audience with the same amount of crap they made in the past.

to:

* A lot of 1960s, '70s and '80s TV action series were built around a cheesy premise, but still (relatively) family-friendly at the same time: ''Series/TheSaint'', ''Series/TheSixMillionDollarMan'', ''Series/KungFu'', ''Series/TheATeam'', and ''Series/CharliesAngels'' here were huge in their heyday. This genre seems to have died somewhere in the 2000s as HBO's drama series considerably upped the ante in quality. As a result result, many of these kinds of cheesy action shows are nowadays directly made into kids' shows, because the makers know they can't reach the adult audience with the same amount of crap they made in the past. shows.
22nd Sep '16 11:04:05 AM Furienna
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* [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] on the Big Four networks. In the 1970s, television networks began producing 90- to 120-minute TV movies as a new form of serialized television, and despite the low budgets and quick shooting schedules, managed to attract a lot of name talent whose schedules otherwise prevented them from committing to a television series. Many of them got big ratings; it was often that you could see a TV movie pull in one-third and even half of the television-watching public. However, increasing budgets and (again) the rise of cable television led to a decline of quality to the point where the glory days were forgotten in favor of being SnarkBait among viewers for their low budgets, StrictlyFormula plots, and bad acting. Nowadays, the Big Four prefer to be more conservative with budgets while TV movies are strictly done for cable, where many networks have more money to spend due to being light on in-house production. Also helping is that with many cable networks and websites getting into the series business, actors who in the past had to be content with taking a TV movie role in between jobs can happily reject them for a much more lucrative and satisfying role in a show guaranteed to make 10 episodes at the least rather than being reduced to paint-by-numbers DamselInDistress fare; those who want to stick with TV movie-like roles can instead take work in much shorter true crime reenactment shows airing on Lifetime, Investigation Discovery, A&E and the network newsmagazines. And while pay networks like Creator/{{HBO}} have garnered much acclaim for their TV movies, most people nowadays think of the format as nothing but one LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, Hallmark Channel TastesLikeDiabetes-fest, UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}/Procter and Gamble co-sponsored sapfests, or next-to-no-budget Creator/{{Syfy}} [[Film/SyfyChannelOriginalMovie creature feature]] after another.

to:

* [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] on the Big Four networks. In the 1970s, television networks began producing 90- to 120-minute TV movies as a new form of serialized television, and despite the low budgets and quick shooting schedules, managed to attract a lot of name talent talent, whose schedules otherwise prevented them from committing to a television series. Many of them got big ratings; it was often that you could see a TV movie pull in one-third and even half of the television-watching public. However, increasing budgets and (again) the rise of cable television led to a decline of quality to the point where the glory days were forgotten in favor of being SnarkBait among viewers for their low budgets, StrictlyFormula plots, and bad acting. Nowadays, the Big Four prefer to be more conservative with budgets while TV movies are strictly done for cable, where many networks have more money to spend due to being light on in-house production. Also helping is that with many cable networks and websites getting into the series business, actors who in the past had to be content with taking a TV movie role in between jobs can happily reject them for a much more lucrative and satisfying role in a show guaranteed to make 10 episodes at the least rather than being reduced to paint-by-numbers DamselInDistress fare; those who want to stick with TV movie-like roles can instead take work in much shorter true crime reenactment shows airing on Lifetime, Investigation Discovery, A&E and the network newsmagazines. And while pay networks like Creator/{{HBO}} have garnered much acclaim for their TV movies, most people nowadays think of the format as nothing but one LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, Hallmark Channel TastesLikeDiabetes-fest, UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}/Procter and Gamble co-sponsored sapfests, or next-to-no-budget Creator/{{Syfy}} [[Film/SyfyChannelOriginalMovie creature feature]] after another.
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