History DeaderThanDisco / Art

5th Apr '16 12:15:15 PM avon
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** On a related note, the original poster illustrations were once regularly used on the packaging of home video film releases. This practice has has mostly dissapeared in the current DVD/Bluray era, even for films that were known for iconic poster illustrations. The artwork for modern DVD or Bluray releases is often represented by mundane, obviously swiped and photoshopped images (typically of cast member faces). Some editions minimize or forgo any artwork at all and may only include a hastily stylized version of the logo along with blurbs such as "Signature Edition" or "Anniversary Edition", especially if it's a box set.
5th Apr '16 12:15:15 PM avon
Is there an issue? Send a Message
23rd Mar '16 7:51:34 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the late 19th century the contemporary art of the academy was hailed as great masterworks, and the art of the impressionist was all but vilified. Today it's the other way around.


Added DiffLines:

* Painting as a whole:
** Art was once patronized by religious organizations like the Catholic Church, and this led to many paintings on religious subjects. Later they were patronized by kings and aristocrats, this led to many paintings on "historical" subjects or offical portraits of royal families. The collapse of the political power of the Church and the erosion of royal authority, led to an end in this genre and the concept of ''state patronage'' of art itself. The artistic marketplace which began in the Amsterdam of Rembrandt, eventually became the model of art. Artists would paint subjects and ideas that they could sell and auction away, this meant the rise of art as commodity.
** In 20th Century, figurative painting (i.e. paintings which represented people, places, objects and events) gave way for expressionist, surrealist, abstract and geometric styles. The portrait painting and the move towards realism and perspective were once the avant-garde, but, with the exception of the likes of Lucian Freud, figurative painting is not as respected by contemporary critics of painting. The main reason for this is the arrival of portrait photography and cinema, which took the place of the classic portrait. The end result is that painting itself is challenged by photography/installation art/plastic art and it no longer seems possible for a painter like Creator/PabloPicasso to take the world by storm with a work like "Guernica".
24th Jan '16 6:11:23 PM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** On a related note, band logos themselves have gone for more simpler designs. Aside from bands with iconic logos (ie, Kiss, Aerosmith), many bands simply have the band name in a simple font, a far cry from the more elaborate and artistic logo designs that many bands in the 70s, 80s, and 90s used.

to:

** On a related note, band logos themselves have gone for more simpler designs. Aside from bands with iconic logos (ie, Kiss, Aerosmith), many bands simply have the band name in a simple font, a far cry from the more elaborate and artistic logo designs that many bands in the 70s, 80s, and 90s used. HeavyMetal logos have been a notable exception, becoming baroque to the point of unreadability-- enough so to get a [[http://www.metalsucks.net/tag/completely-unreadable-band-logo-of-the-week/ website]] dedicated to the phenomenon.
20th Jan '16 9:07:25 PM J79
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Related, but band logos themselves have gone for more simpler designs. Aside from bands with iconic logos (ie, Kiss, Aerosmith), many bands simply have the band name in a simple font, a far cry from the more elaborate logo designs that many bands in the 70s, 80s, and 90s used.

to:

** Related, but On a related note, band logos themselves have gone for more simpler designs. Aside from bands with iconic logos (ie, Kiss, Aerosmith), many bands simply have the band name in a simple font, a far cry from the more elaborate and artistic logo designs that many bands in the 70s, 80s, and 90s used.
20th Jan '16 9:06:25 PM J79
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Related, but band logos themselves have gone for more simpler designs. Aside from bands with iconic logos (ie, Kiss, Aerosmith), many bands simply have the band name in a simple font, a far cry from the more elaborate logo designs that many bands in the 70s, 80s, and 90s used.
1st Jul '15 1:29:56 PM Omeganian
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ScienceFiction cover art which had enjoyed some popularity in the Eastern Bloc during the heyday of Communism exploded like a supernova just after 1990 - throughout [[TheNineties the 1990s]], all translations and reprints of Western Sci Fi featured glorious covers imitating the above-quoted artists, with complex spaceships, images of deep space, galaxies, and [[SexSells space-suited buxom heroines]]. Once the decade ended, the cover art style had become more tasteful, restricted and subtle.

to:

** The ScienceFiction cover art which had enjoyed some popularity in the Eastern Bloc during the heyday of Communism exploded like a supernova just after 1990 - throughout [[TheNineties the 1990s]], all translations and reprints of Western Sci Fi featured glorious covers imitating the above-quoted artists, with complex spaceships, images of deep space, galaxies, and [[SexSells space-suited buxom heroines]].heroines]] (with the bad habit of copying Western covers from completely unrelated works for both translations and original books). Once the decade ended, the cover art style had become more tasteful, restricted and subtle.
22nd Jun '15 5:43:35 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message





* The movie poster also isn't what it used to be. Hand painted movie posters from pre 1990s films are still considered collectors items. Prolific artists included FrankFrazetta (''WhatsNewPussycat'',''WesternAnimation/FireAndIce''), BorisVallejo (''{{Barbarella}}'', ''NationalLampoonsEuropeanVacation''), Jim Steranko (''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk''), and the Brothers Hildebrant (''Franchise/StarWars''). These illustrators often drew the films characters larger than life and often highly stylized, though still recognizable. They also experimented with creative stylish layouts in which the cast and characters were not depicted at all in the poster, a practice which is absolutely frowned upon today given that big name stars are intended as part of the film's appeal. During TheNineties, digital editing such as Photoshop enabled movie posters and advertisements to be created cheaply by staff on hand and in a minimum amount of time removing the expense of hiring a dedicated illustrator. This has resulted in movie posters that have very homogenous, formulaic, [[FilmPosters trope-ridden layouts and designs]]. They are no longer the unique, iconic works of art that caught moviegoers attention in previous decades.

to:

* The movie poster also isn't what it used to be. Hand painted movie posters from pre 1990s films are still considered collectors items. Prolific artists included FrankFrazetta (''WhatsNewPussycat'',''WesternAnimation/FireAndIce''), (''Film/WhatsNewPussycat'', ''WesternAnimation/FireAndIce''), BorisVallejo (''{{Barbarella}}'', ''NationalLampoonsEuropeanVacation''), Jim Steranko (''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk''), and the Brothers Hildebrant (''Franchise/StarWars''). These illustrators often drew the films characters larger than life and often highly stylized, though still recognizable. They also experimented with creative stylish layouts in which the cast and characters were not depicted at all in the poster, a practice which is absolutely frowned upon today given that big name stars are intended as part of the film's appeal. During TheNineties, digital editing such as Photoshop enabled movie posters and advertisements to be created cheaply by staff on hand and in a minimum amount of time removing the expense of hiring a dedicated illustrator. This has resulted in movie posters that have very homogenous, formulaic, [[FilmPosters trope-ridden layouts and designs]]. They are no longer the unique, iconic works of art that caught moviegoers moviegoers' attention in previous decades.
decades.
16th May '15 12:22:30 PM 10-13-2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries illustrations and advertisements were often hand-painted by artists, but beginning with the 70's, hand-illustrated advertisements and posters began to die out.
** The movie poster also isn't what it used to be. Hand painted movie posters from pre 1990s films are still considered collectors items. Prolific artists included FrankFrazetta (''WhatsNewPussycat'',''WesternAnimation/FireAndIce''), BorisVallejo (''{{Barbarella}}'', ''NationalLampoonsEuropeanVacation''), Jim Steranko (''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk''), and the Brothers Hildebrant (''Franchise/StarWars''). These illustrators often drew the films characters larger than life and often highly stylized, though still recognizable. They also experimented with creative stylish layouts in which the cast and characters were not depicted at all in the poster, a practice which is absolutely frowned upon today given that big name stars are intended as part of the film's appeal. During TheNineties, digital editing such as Photoshop enabled movie posters and advertisements to be created cheaply by staff on hand and in a minimum amount of time removing the expense of hiring a dedicated illustrator. This has resulted in movie posters that have very homogenous, formulaic, [[FilmPosters trope-ridden layouts and designs]]. They are no longer the unique, iconic works of art that caught moviegoers attention in previous decades.

to:

* Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries illustrations and advertisements were often hand-painted by artists, but beginning with the 70's, hand-illustrated advertisements and posters began to die out.
**
out. While there are still illustrated advertisements in many magazines, they are often outright cartoons that don't even try to be photorealistic (as strange as it may now sound, those colorful, Norman Rockwell-style painted ads of the 1960s and earlier were done by illustrators trained at prestigious art schools, and were hailed at the time for their startling realism, in sharp contrast to the Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism of "serious" art world).
*
The movie poster also isn't what it used to be. Hand painted movie posters from pre 1990s films are still considered collectors items. Prolific artists included FrankFrazetta (''WhatsNewPussycat'',''WesternAnimation/FireAndIce''), BorisVallejo (''{{Barbarella}}'', ''NationalLampoonsEuropeanVacation''), Jim Steranko (''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk''), and the Brothers Hildebrant (''Franchise/StarWars''). These illustrators often drew the films characters larger than life and often highly stylized, though still recognizable. They also experimented with creative stylish layouts in which the cast and characters were not depicted at all in the poster, a practice which is absolutely frowned upon today given that big name stars are intended as part of the film's appeal. During TheNineties, digital editing such as Photoshop enabled movie posters and advertisements to be created cheaply by staff on hand and in a minimum amount of time removing the expense of hiring a dedicated illustrator. This has resulted in movie posters that have very homogenous, formulaic, [[FilmPosters trope-ridden layouts and designs]]. They are no longer the unique, iconic works of art that caught moviegoers attention in previous decades.
17th Mar '15 12:37:49 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Record album jacket covers: Once this was all that was needed to sell a record album, no matter how bad the album actually was. The phrase "Never judge an album by its cover'' was rarely heeded by customers. Beautifully illustrated album covers have often made the purchase of an unremarkable album worthwhile. Art has ranged from surreal, psychedelic to sci-fi/fantasy illustrations. Notable artists included Roger Dean, Creator/{{Hipgnosis}}, and Shusei Nagaoka. Today's CD covers are more decidedly pedestrian and minimalist; either sporting a naturalistic photo or group photo of the artist(s) or simply the logo of the band. With the increasing popularity of direct digital downloads, art for music packaging is likely to vanish altogether in the not too distant future.

to:

* Record album jacket covers: Once this was all that was needed to sell a record album, no matter how bad the album actually was. The phrase "Never judge an album by its cover'' was rarely heeded by customers. Beautifully illustrated album covers have often made the purchase of an unremarkable album worthwhile. Art has ranged from surreal, psychedelic to sci-fi/fantasy illustrations. Notable artists included Roger Dean, Creator/{{Hipgnosis}}, and Shusei Nagaoka. Today's CD covers are more decidedly pedestrian and minimalist; minimalist, either sporting a naturalistic photo or group photo of the artist(s) or simply the logo of the band. With the increasing popularity of direct digital downloads, art for music packaging is likely to vanish altogether in the not too distant future.
This list shows the last 10 events of 30. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.Art