History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

28th Sep '16 11:13:23 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. It's an [[ObviousBeta obvious pre-alpha build]] of a game, with no collision detection, no AI and some incredibly bad programming of physics (as in, go as fast as you want Warp 9000, if you have the patience but ''only in reverse''). Despite being obviously an alpha, the creators ''[[TheyJustDidntCare tried to sell it as it was anyway]]''.

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* ''BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. It's an [[ObviousBeta obvious pre-alpha build]] of a game, with no collision detection, no AI and some incredibly bad programming of physics (as in, go as fast as you want Warp 9000, if you have the patience but ''only in reverse''). Despite being obviously an alpha, the creators ''[[TheyJustDidntCare tried ''tried to sell it as it was anyway]]''.anyway''.



** However, the design flaw that led to the fatal [=RRoDs=] was at the very least a boneheaded decision on Microsoft's part, and at worst, proof that TheyJustDidntCare about making something reliable. Basically, the chip containing the graphics core and memory controller got exceptionally hot under full load, and was only cooled by a crappy little heatsink. This led to the chip in question actually ''desoldering itself'' from the motherboard after a while, and people who opened up the cases on dead units actually reported the chip falling out of the console after removing the heatsink.

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** However, the design flaw that led to the fatal [=RRoDs=] was at the very least a boneheaded decision on Microsoft's part, and at worst, proof that TheyJustDidntCare about making something reliable.part. Basically, the chip containing the graphics core and memory controller got exceptionally hot under full load, and was only cooled by a crappy little heatsink. This led to the chip in question actually ''desoldering itself'' from the motherboard after a while, and people who opened up the cases on dead units actually reported the chip falling out of the console after removing the heatsink.
22nd Sep '16 9:13:50 PM HijikataX
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* [=VIA=] , the 3rd x86 competitor is not that far behind in how they failed their market target. Their VIA C3 was so awful that it was even slower than a Pentium II and after that it went downhill to become near extinct.
* Qualcomm had their own share of failure: The Snapdragon 808 and 810 were very powerful chips on their year (2015) since they were based on the high performance ARM A57 design, but it had a very important disadvantage: it overheats to the point to make it throttle and lose performance! And 3 terminals got hit 'hard' with this: The LG G4 (with Snapdragon 808), becomming infamous since it dies with just 1 year working, the HTC M9 which became infamous to overheat a lot since it was using the Snapdragon 810 and the Sony Xperia Z5, with the same reasons of the former one. No wonder why the rest of the competition (Hisilicon and Mediatek) avoided the ARM A57 design.
20th Sep '16 1:12:38 AM Taxi-Pizzatime
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The System Restore feature has been problematic historically. If you ever need to roll back the system, there is no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and Windows to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed and the restore point failed. Also ridiculous is when the system reports a failure to restore, but rebooting the system will reveal that the restoration was fine. Additionally, using system restore after a major service pack update may actually ruin the system, requiring an installation DVD for a clean install (your files are moved into a directory unharmed).\\

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The System Restore feature has been problematic historically. If you ever need to roll back the system, there is no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and On startup Windows 10 detects a problem with the hardware. [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading After making a slowass scan of the whole system]], it invites the user to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed click on the repair button, except the mouse and the restore point failed. Also ridiculous is when keyboard aren't responding. With no way initiate repairs, the system reports a failure to restore, but rebooting the system will reveal that the restoration was fine. Additionally, using system restore after a major service pack update may actually ruin the system, requiring an installation DVD for a clean install (your files are moved into a directory unharmed).OS is utterly useless.\\



You may as well just ignore System Restore and just use ''Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7)'' to save a drive image to a removable HDD/flash-stick and create an emergency boot DVD. Use this combo for when your computer goes insane; there is too much that can go wrong with System Restore.\\

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You may as well just ignore The System Restore and just use ''Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7)'' feature has also been problematic historically. If you ever need to save a drive image to a removable HDD/flash-stick and create an emergency boot DVD. Use this combo for when your computer goes insane; roll back the system, there is too much no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can go wrong with System Restore.be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and Windows to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed and the restore point failed. Also ridiculous is when the system reports a failure to restore, but rebooting the system will reveal that the restoration was fine. Additionally, using system restore after a major service pack update may actually ruin the system, requiring an installation DVD for a clean install (your files are moved into a directory unharmed).\\



On startup Windows 10 detects a problem with the hardware. [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading After making a slowass scan of the whole system]], it invite the user to click on the repair button, except the mouse and the keyboard aren't responding. With no way initiate repairs, the OS is utterly useless.

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On startup Windows 10 detects You may as well just ignore System Restore and just use ''Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7)'' to save a problem drive image to a removable HDD/flash-stick and create an emergency boot DVD. Use this combo for when your computer goes insane; there is too much that can go wrong with the hardware. [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading After making a slowass scan of the whole system]], it invite the user to click on the repair button, except the mouse and the keyboard aren't responding. With no way initiate repairs, the OS is utterly useless.System Restore.
20th Sep '16 1:10:09 AM Taxi-Pizzatime
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* For a year or so, Windows 10 had multiple bugs and slow-downs until Microsoft incrementally updated these problems as a token of good will. These annoyances (along with many new mandatory features) did not help Window 10's negative image in the eyes of the owners of previous editions.

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* For a year or so, Windows 10 had multiple bugs and slow-downs until Microsoft incrementally updated these problems as a token of good will. These annoyances (along with many new mandatory features) did not help Window 10's negative image in the eyes of the owners of previous editions.\\
19th Sep '16 11:55:05 PM RecentIdiocy
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* Android's application rights management is a joke compared to iOS's. On Android, applications don't request rights, they demand them: The Google Play will warn you before install that the application wants to access, say, the Internet, but the only way to forbid it from doing so is not to install the app at all! You can't simply install the application in a restricted sandbox.
19th Sep '16 11:37:51 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
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19th Sep '16 11:18:25 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
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* With Windows 10 now available, tech magazines said good things of it, and Microsoft has made effort to win back the UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows 7 demographic. However, AMD A-Series users may have upgraded, only to find that their system (notably pre-configured ones, like Hewlett Packard Pavilion Laptops) is now very unstable, with Explorer suffering a lot, causing users to either revert to Windows 8/7, restore a backup image to an earlier time, or [[GuideDangIt (if they copied down their installation-key from a key-viewing program)]] burn a re-installation disc and attempt a Microsoft-sanctioned install.\\

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* With For a year or so, Windows 10 now available, tech magazines said good things of it, had multiple bugs and slow-downs until Microsoft has made effort to win back the UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows 7 demographic. However, AMD A-Series users may have upgraded, only to find that their system (notably pre-configured ones, like Hewlett Packard Pavilion Laptops) is now very unstable, incrementally updated these problems as a token of good will. These annoyances (along with Explorer suffering a lot, causing users to either revert to Windows 8/7, restore a backup many new mandatory features) did not help Window 10's negative image to an earlier time, or [[GuideDangIt (if they copied down their installation-key from a key-viewing program)]] burn a re-installation disc and attempt a Microsoft-sanctioned install.\\in the eyes of the owners of previous editions.



The nice part about a clean install is it frees your computer of the [[{{Shareware}}pre-installed crapware]] and outdated drivers that may be gimping your computer; this can let the computer function better than the OEM version (More on that problem in the Hewlett Packard section). Why Microsoft doesn't prevent unstable drivers or programs from transferring to Windows 10 is another puzzler. Microsoft has also been pleading with computer manufacturers to stop with this practice of weighting down their operating system with "crapware", due to [[{{Misblamed}} the blame spilling over to their company.]]\\

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The nice part about System Restore feature has been problematic historically. If you ever need to roll back the system, there is no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and Windows to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed and the restore point failed. Also ridiculous is when the system reports a failure to restore, but rebooting the system will reveal that the restoration was fine. Additionally, using system restore after a major service pack update may actually ruin the system, requiring an installation DVD for a clean install is it frees your computer of the [[{{Shareware}}pre-installed crapware]] and outdated drivers that may be gimping your computer; this can let the computer function better than the OEM version (More on that problem in the Hewlett Packard section). Why Microsoft doesn't prevent unstable drivers or programs from transferring to Windows 10 is another puzzler. Microsoft has also been pleading with computer manufacturers to stop with this practice of weighting down their operating system with "crapware", due to [[{{Misblamed}} the blame spilling over to their company.]]\\(your files are moved into a directory unharmed).\\



While not a total system-breaker, Windows 10 Explorer still has some stray bugs here and there. The Explorer, which includes the Start menu interface and system Explorer proper, was once prone to seizing up temporarily and eventually coming free, or being restarted by Windows if it had hung for a certain period of time. This even occurred on a reasonably new computer with a fresh install of Windows 10, which is puzzling to say the least. This was annoying if one just came from Windows 8.1; the Start interface was radically different from Windows 7, but was ''noticeably less'' likely to trip up and restart.\\

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While not a total system-breaker, Windows 10 Explorer still has some stray bugs here You may as well just ignore System Restore and there. The Explorer, which includes the Start menu interface just use ''Control Panel\System and system Explorer proper, was once prone to seizing up temporarily Security\Backup and eventually coming free, or being restarted by Windows if it had hung Restore (Windows 7)'' to save a drive image to a removable HDD/flash-stick and create an emergency boot DVD. Use this combo for a certain period of time. This even occurred on a reasonably new when your computer goes insane; there is too much that can go wrong with a fresh install of Windows 10, which is puzzling to say the least. This was annoying if one just came from Windows 8.1; the Start interface was radically different from Windows 7, but was ''noticeably less'' likely to trip up and restart.System Restore.\\



Thankfully, the November 2015 Service Pack for Windows 10 solved many of the bugs that the initial release had, and it appears Windows 10 is on its way to being just as stable as Windows 8.1 was. The upgrade even helps by resetting some of the configurations and apps (without totally resetting the system) for a like-new feel.\\
\\
However, the System Restore feature still needs help. If you ever need to roll back the system, there is no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and Windows to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed and the restore point failed. Also ridiculous is when the system reports a failure to restore, but rebooting the system will reveal that the restoration was fine. Additionally, using system restore after a major service pack update may actually ruin the system, requiring an installation DVD for a clean install (your files are moved into a directory unharmed).\\
\\
You may as well just ignore System Restore and just use ''Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7)'' to save a drive image to a removable HDD/flash-stick and create an emergency boot DVD. Use this combo for when your computer goes insane; there is too much that can go wrong with System Restore.\\
\\


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* Although solid state hard drives render file fragmentation a moot point, on conventional hard disks, the anti-fragmentation routines of NTFS are not very forward-thinking. When NTFS tries to place new files, it does place them in a location where they tend to be contiguous, but files that undergo alterations in size tend to fragment.
16th Sep '16 6:29:00 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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[[folder:Miscellaneous Examples]]

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[[folder:Miscellaneous Examples]]Madness]]
14th Sep '16 8:21:13 AM Someoneman
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* Some HP laptops have a feature called "Action Keys". On most laptops, doing things like adjusting volume or screen brightness would require you to hold the "fn" key and press a certain function key at the same time. Since the "fn" key is normally at the bottom of the keyboard and the function keys are normally at the top, this could get annoying or [[SomeDexterityRequired uncomfortable]], so HP had the idea to switch this around: pressing a function key on its own would adjust volume or brightness, and users who actually want to press the function key can do so by holding down the "fn" key. Since most computer users adjust the volume or brightness much more often than they need to press F6, this is nice, but what if you do need to use the function keys a lot (for example, when programming and using debug mode)? Hopefully HP included an option to conveniently switch Action Keys on and off, right? You wish. Disabling or re-enabling the Action Keys requires you to turn off the laptop, then switch it back on while holding F10 to open up the BIOS menu, where you can find the option. Each time you want to switch between these modes, you need to reset your laptop, which is a massive inconvenience. And even worse, screen-reading software does not work in the BIOS menu, which makes changing these options almost impossible for visually-impaired users. On the bright side, key combinations like Alt+F4 still work, but why HP didn't just make this easy to switch on and off is a mystery.
9th Sep '16 4:17:23 PM Edrobot
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esoteric_programming_language Esoteric Programming Languages]] turn this into an art form, with a helping of StylisticSuck. How about a programming language that uses nothing but whitespace characters? Or a language whose code is written in bitmaps that look like abstract art?
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