History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

23rd Apr '17 2:44:49 PM Kadorhal
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* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually ''killed people''? That would involve none other than the infamous [[[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25 Therac-25]], a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now cited in introductory programming classes to this day as an example of how '''not''' to program.

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* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually ''killed people''? That would involve none other than the infamous [[[[https://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25 Therac-25]], a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now cited in introductory programming classes to this day as an example of how '''not''' to program.
23rd Apr '17 2:43:39 PM Kadorhal
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* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually KILLED SOMEONE? Yes, this troper is talking about the infamous Therac-25, a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25]] describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This troper also distinctly remembers the Therac-25 being directly cited as an example of how NOT to program in at least two of his computer science classes at college. Just let that sink in: This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now cited in introductory programming classes to this day!

to:

* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually KILLED SOMEONE? Yes, this troper is talking about ''killed people''? That would involve none other than the infamous Therac-25, a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it at [[https://en.[[[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25]] org/wiki/Therac-25 Therac-25]], a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This troper also distinctly remembers the Therac-25 being directly cited as an example of how NOT to program in at least two of his computer science classes at college. Just let that sink in: This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now cited in introductory programming classes to this day!day as an example of how '''not''' to program.
23rd Apr '17 2:23:45 PM Genon
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* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually KILLED SOMEONE? Yes, this troper is talking about the infamous Therac-25, a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25]] describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This troper also distinctly remembers the Therac-25 being directly cited as an example of how NOT to program in at least two of his computer science classes at college. Just let that sink in: This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now a used in programming classes to this day!

to:

* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually KILLED SOMEONE? Yes, this troper is talking about the infamous Therac-25, a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive (and often quite fatal) overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25]] describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This troper also distinctly remembers the Therac-25 being directly cited as an example of how NOT to program in at least two of his computer science classes at college. Just let that sink in: This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now a used cited in introductory programming classes to this day!
23rd Apr '17 2:20:04 PM Genon
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* You can't talk about idiot programming without mentioning one of the most infamous software glitches of all time. Most of the glitches on this page probably caused inconveniences, lost data, or locked someone out of using a product. But what about a software glitch that actually KILLED SOMEONE? Yes, this troper is talking about the infamous Therac-25, a piece of radiology equipment so poorly programmed that it gave everyone who used it massive overdoses of radiation. The Other Wiki's article on it at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25]] describes it as "involved in at least six accidents between 1985 and 1987, in which patients were given massive overdoses of radiation. Because of concurrent programming errors, it sometimes gave its patients radiation doses that were hundreds of times greater than normal, resulting in death or serious injury. These accidents highlighted the dangers of software control of safety-critical systems, and they have become a standard case study in health informatics and software engineering. Additionally the overconfidence of the engineers and lack of proper due diligence to resolve reported software bugs, is highlighted as an extreme case where the engineer's overconfidence in their initial work and failure to believe the end users' claims caused drastic repercussions." This troper also distinctly remembers the Therac-25 being directly cited as an example of how NOT to program in at least two of his computer science classes at college. Just let that sink in: This machine's shoddy programming was so infamous that it is now a used in programming classes to this day!
23rd Apr '17 1:51:12 AM Kadorhal
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** The PC port of ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' had the same issue. When it ran in windowed mode, the game's framerate was based on the speed of the processor running it, which even when the port was first released resulted in a ridiculously-fast, unplayable game. Fortunately for its case, playing the game in fullscreen instead bases the framerate on the refresh rate of the monitor, which even two decades after will still usually be around the same framerate it was meant to run at.
22nd Apr '17 11:50:00 AM Kadorhal
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* Games for Windows Live was Microsoft's attempt to take on UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, and given Microsoft's sheer resources, many thought they would have some success in this. To put it lightly, however...they didn't. Poor design choices all around meant that it never attracted many users, and was eventually discontinued in August 2013, to be replaced by an integrated app store in Windows 8 -- and for all that OS's faults, the app store sensibly decided to target casual games, a market which Steam and the others haven't exploited as much -- until Windows 10, that is. As for why the GFWL marketplace was discontinued:

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* Games for Windows Live was Microsoft's attempt to take on UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, and given Microsoft's sheer resources, many thought they would have some success in this. To put it lightly, however... they didn't. Poor design choices all around meant that it never attracted many users, and was eventually discontinued in August 2013, to be replaced by an integrated app store in Windows 8 -- and for all that OS's faults, the app store sensibly decided to target casual games, a market which Steam and the others haven't exploited as much -- until Windows 10, that is. As for why the GFWL marketplace was discontinued:



*** Not to mention that it's a crapshoot over whether you can actually get that update -- DLC can be denied to a player for no reason whatsoever. ''VideoGame/RedFaction: Guerrilla'''s multiplayer mode was rendered entirely unplayable because GFWL basically decided that faking an update and then slowing the game to a crawl rather than finding whatever it was looking for sounded like jolly good fun.
** Another terrible aspect of GFWL is that it a lot of games using it have their save games locked down in a way that makes you essentially lose them every time you reinstall a game or try to transfer your progress to another system. Again this compares unfavorably to Steam, which either just keeps out of the way of screwing with save-files in the first place, or, with Steam Cloud, outright embraces transferring them to different systems or installations.

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*** Not to mention that it's a crapshoot over whether you can actually get that update -- DLC can be denied to a player for no reason whatsoever. ''VideoGame/RedFaction: Guerrilla'''s multiplayer mode was rendered entirely unplayable until the developers, like many others, updated the game years after the fact to integrate it with (who else) Steam instead, because GFWL basically decided that faking an update and then slowing the game to a crawl rather than finding whatever it was looking for sounded like jolly good fun.
** Another terrible aspect of GFWL is that it a lot of games using it have their save games locked down in a way that makes you essentially lose them every time you reinstall a game or try to transfer your progress to another system. Again this compares unfavorably to Steam, which either just keeps out of the way of screwing with save-files in the first place, or, with Steam Cloud, outright embraces transferring them to different systems or installations.



* Unfortunately for gamers, once Microsoft attempted supporting hardcore gamers again on PC on Windows 10, said gamers discovered that the Microsoft Store is an absolute ''disaster''. No offline play, issues downloading games, and now requiring patches to play a game at all, even in single player, and the way downloading patches works essentially means you need to have enough space on your hard drive to be able to ''download the entire game again'' just to patch it, among other issues. Some gamers are claiming that these issues make [=GFWL=] look ''competent by comparison'', with many considering it the second incarnation of [=GFWL=]. No wonder PC games such as ''VideoGame/QuantumBreak'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'' have sold terribly on the Microsoft Store, in the realm of ''single-digit percentage'' of total sales with the rest being the Steam versions.

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* Unfortunately for gamers, once Microsoft attempted supporting hardcore gamers again on PC on Windows 10, said gamers discovered that the Microsoft Store is an absolute ''disaster''. No offline play, issues downloading games, and now requiring patches to play a game at all, even in single player, and the way downloading patches works essentially means you need to have enough space on your hard drive to be able to ''download the entire game again'' just to patch it, among other issues. Some gamers are claiming that these issues make [=GFWL=] GFWL look ''competent by comparison'', with many considering it the second incarnation of [=GFWL=].GFWL. No wonder PC games such as ''VideoGame/QuantumBreak'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'' have sold terribly on the Microsoft Store, in the realm of ''single-digit percentage'' of total sales with the rest being the Steam versions.



** Also, Windows Media Player started as a very simplistic, lean-and-clean little software that did its basic job (of playing multimedia files), and did it decently well. Then at some point each new version of it added more and more eye candy to it, increasing its resource consumption and decreasing its usability, up to a point where it became almost unusable. (This is the reason why Media Player Classic was made: To give people the good old WMP without the cruft.) The Windows 7 version of WMP backed up a bit on the eye candy and cruft and is at least barely usable.

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** Also, Windows Media Player started as a very simplistic, lean-and-clean little software that did its basic job (of playing multimedia files), and did it decently well. Then at some point each new version of it added more and more eye candy to it, increasing its resource consumption and decreasing its usability, up to a point where it became almost unusable. (This This is the reason why Media Player Classic was made: To made, actually: to give people the good old WMP without the cruft.) cruft. The Windows 7 version of WMP backed up a bit on the eye candy and cruft and is at least barely usable.



* When trying to make a Windows 8 boot disk, it will failed unexpectedly. Why? Because the screensaver kicked in after minutes of non-activity and messed-up the whole process.

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* When trying to make a Windows 8 boot disk, it will failed fail unexpectedly. Why? Because the screensaver kicked in after minutes of non-activity and messed-up messed up the whole process.



** Windows 10 installs updates by default, leaving home users with no way to defer or refuse defective updates. Before launch, Microsoft claimed they would perform rigorous testing of each new updates through their [[PerpetualBeta fast track program]]. Long story short, the first update that left users with an unusable computer occurred '' before launch'', as the beta phase was winding down.

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** Windows 10 installs updates by default, leaving home users with no way to defer or refuse defective updates. Before launch, Microsoft claimed they would perform rigorous testing of each new updates through their [[PerpetualBeta fast track program]]. Long story short, the first update that left users with an unusable computer occurred '' before ''before launch'', as the beta phase was winding down.



* As of version 7.18, Skype has a tendency to crash whenever the user tries to copy something out of a chat window, or even when they try to browse through folders! (Windows Explorer being a completely separate process which shares no resources whatsoever with Skype, this last one is particularly inexcusable.) It's never a good sign when the official solution for a problem is "switch to an older version."

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* As of version 7.18, Skype has a tendency to crash whenever the user tries to copy something out of a chat window, or even when they try to browse through folders! (Windows Windows Explorer being a completely separate process which shares no resources whatsoever with Skype, this last one is particularly inexcusable.) inexcusable. It's never a good sign when the official solution for a problem is "switch to an older version."



* Windows 10 has a tendency to install apps without the users consent, and no way to disable this feature other than [[http://winaero.com/blog/fix-windows-10-installs-apps-like-candy-crush-soda-saga-automatically/ changing the damned registry.]]

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* Windows 10 has a tendency to install apps without the users user's consent, and no way to disable this feature other than [[http://winaero.com/blog/fix-windows-10-installs-apps-like-candy-crush-soda-saga-automatically/ changing the damned registry.]]



* As discovered in the months when the [=PS3=] was hacked, some of the code in the system involving signing software was discovered to use a constant integer for all systems, which was barely obfuscated at all. (Some simple algebra was all it took to get it) [[labelnote:Click here for a full explanation]]In cryptography, a nonce, or "'''n'''umber used '''once'''", is used to prevent replay attacks by making the same plaintext encrypt to a different ciphertext each time. This makes it impossible for an attacker to save a previous ciphertext and resend it a second time, since it will no longer be valid on the second try. So naturally, some Einsteins at Sony wrote their signing code to always use the exact same nonce, rendering the nonce a moot point entirely.[[/labelnote]]
* The Sony rootkit designed to install whenever a user placed an audio CD in their computer. Ironically, this wouldn't get installed on many user's computers because ''it required administrative privileges to install'', and a safe setup will deny these privileges to prevent ''just this kind of software from installing''. On top of that, the rootkit installed on [=AutoPlay=], which means (on Windows XP and earlier from before [=AutoPlay=] was changed to be prompt-only) you could defeat it by, on top of disabling [=AutoPlay=] altogether, ''holding the shift key'' when you insert the disc. If the rootkit ''did'' manage to get itself installed on a ''paying customer's'' computer, it would slow down the CPU AND open up gigantic security holes that would invite (additional) malware.\\

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* As discovered in the months when the [=PS3=] was hacked, some of the code in the system involving signing software was discovered to use a constant integer for all systems, which was barely obfuscated at all. (Some Some simple algebra was all it took to get it) it.[[labelnote:Click here for a full explanation]]In cryptography, a nonce, or "'''n'''umber used '''once'''", is used to prevent replay attacks by making the same plaintext encrypt to a different ciphertext each time. This makes it impossible for an attacker to save a previous ciphertext and resend it a second time, since it will no longer be valid on the second try. So naturally, some Einsteins at Sony wrote their signing code to always use the exact same nonce, rendering the nonce a moot point entirely.[[/labelnote]]
* The Sony rootkit designed to install whenever a user placed an audio CD in their computer. Ironically, this wouldn't get installed on many user's computers because ''it required administrative privileges to install'', and a safe setup will deny these privileges to prevent ''just this kind of software from installing''. On top of that, the rootkit installed on [=AutoPlay=], which means (on Windows XP and earlier from before [=AutoPlay=] was changed to be prompt-only) you could defeat it by, on top of disabling [=AutoPlay=] altogether, ''holding the shift key'' when you insert the disc. If the rootkit ''did'' manage to get itself installed on a ''paying customer's'' computer, it would slow down the CPU AND ''and'' open up gigantic security holes that would invite (additional) malware.\\
20th Apr '17 3:30:59 PM OmegaMetroid
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** This appears to be caused by the way Twitter handles pictures. When you click an image in your twitter feed, it appends ":large" to the URL ([[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg:large example]]). Some browsers have no idea how to handle this (Chrome will try to name the example "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large", while Firefox will try to name it "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg%20large"). Other sites that use URL postfixes can have similar problems.

to:

** This appears to be caused by the way Twitter handles pictures. When you click an image in your twitter feed, it appends ":large" to the URL ([[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg:large example]]). Some browsers have no idea how to handle this (Chrome will try to name the example "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large", [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large"=], while Firefox will try to name it "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.[="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg%20large").jpg%20large"=]). Other sites that use URL postfixes can have similar problems.
20th Apr '17 3:28:26 PM OmegaMetroid
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Added DiffLines:

** This appears to be caused by the way Twitter handles pictures. When you click an image in your twitter feed, it appends ":large" to the URL ([[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg:large example]]). Some browsers have no idea how to handle this (Chrome will try to name the example "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large", while Firefox will try to name it "C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg%20large"). Other sites that use URL postfixes can have similar problems.
19th Apr '17 3:12:52 PM Kadorhal
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** The circular D-Pad on the 360's controller. Anyone who's used it will tell you how hard it is to reliably hit a direction on the pad without hitting the other sensors next to it. The oft-derided [[DisneyOwnsThisTrope U.S. patent system]] might be partially responsible for this, as some of the good ideas (Nintendo's + pad, Sony's cross pad) were "taken". Still, there are plenty of PC pads that don't have this issue to the same degree.
*** Ditto the D-Pad of the Microsoft [=SideWinder=] Freestyle Pro gamepad.

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** The circular D-Pad on the 360's controller.controller (likewise for the Microsoft [=SideWinder=] Freestyle Pro gamepad), which is clearly designed to look cool first and actually function second. Anyone who's used it will tell you how hard it is to reliably hit a direction on the pad without hitting the other sensors next to it. The oft-derided [[DisneyOwnsThisTrope U.S. patent system]] might be partially responsible for this, as some of the good ideas (Nintendo's + pad, Sony's cross pad) were "taken". Still, there are plenty of PC pads that don't have this issue to the same degree.
*** Ditto
degree... or, there were, until every third-party pad [[FollowTheLeader started ripping off the D-Pad of the Microsoft [=SideWinder=] Freestyle Pro gamepad.360 one wholesale]], unusable D-pad and all.



* After insulting the childishness of the [[UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance GBA]] through PR, Nokia created the complete joke of a design that was the original N-Gage. As a phone, the only way you could speak or hear anything effectively is if the user held the thin side of the unit to his/her ear (earning it the derisive nickname "taco phone" and the infamous "sidetalking"). From a gaming point of view, it was even worse, as the screen was oriented vertically instead of horizontally like most handhelds, limiting the player's ability to see the game field (very problematic with games like the N-Gage port of ''[[SonicAdvanceTrilogy Sonic Advance]]''). Worst of all, however, is the fact that in order to change games, one had to remove the casing and the battery every single time.

to:

* After insulting the childishness of the [[UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance GBA]] through PR, Nokia created the complete joke of a design that was the original N-Gage. As a phone, the only way you could speak or hear anything effectively is if the user held the thin side of the unit to his/her ear (earning it the derisive nickname "taco phone" and the infamous "sidetalking"). From a gaming point of view, it was even worse, as the screen was oriented vertically instead of horizontally like most handhelds, limiting the player's ability to see the game field (very problematic with games like the N-Gage port of ''[[SonicAdvanceTrilogy ''[[VideoGame/SonicAdvanceTrilogy Sonic Advance]]''). Worst of all, however, is the fact that in order to change games, one had to remove the casing and the battery every single time.
16th Apr '17 8:11:58 AM KatanaCat
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* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' for the NES is already a masterpiece of broken game design, but one of the key factors for some of the glitches that can happen in the game are caused by the ''mapper in the cart'', not just in the coding. ''Action 52'' uses Mapper 228, which is unique as it's similar to the ones found in most bootleg multi-carts. Every game made for the NES has different types of mappers, and some of them have their own coding that can pull off some effects, like in the Japanese version of ''Contra'', there's snow blowing in the mountain level, which from removed in the international versions to cut the costs. If you were to use a mapper, you need to be aware that the console can only read information from it in a specific way, or else you'll run into problems. Even then, it's not guaranteed to work because for the most part; the NES isn't made to read unlicensed mappers, especially if you were to program something in a certain way that the NES couldn't handle. One notable example regarding this issue is that ''Alfredo and the Fettucini'' and ''Jigsaw'' always crash when you try to load them normally, although most games on the cart start just fine. [[labelnote:Why is that?]]If you open the game ROM by using a hex editor like [=XVI32=], you would discover that both games share the same ''bootup screen''. It's not only the same screen that lets you choose between one or two players, but it also ''executes the game''. Mapper 228 is supposed to overlook that problem, but most emulators and even the NES itself doesn't support it, and it didn't understand the redirection.[[/labelnote]] Of course, ''Action 52'' is already infamous as it is for boasting so many games in one cartridge, and not a single one of them got past ObviousBeta or is even considered acceptable for alpha standards.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' for the NES is already a masterpiece of broken game design, but one of the key factors for some of the glitches that can happen in the game are caused by the ''mapper in the cart'', not just in the coding. ''Action 52'' uses Mapper 228, which is unique as it's similar to the ones found in most bootleg multi-carts. Every game made for the NES has different types of mappers, and some of them have their own coding that can pull off some effects, effects - like in the Japanese version of ''Contra'', there's snow blowing in the mountain level, which from removed in the international versions to cut the costs. If you were to use a mapper, you need to be aware that the console can only read information from it in a specific way, or else you'll run into problems. Even then, it's not guaranteed to work because for the most part; the NES isn't made to read unlicensed mappers, especially if you were to program something in a certain way that the NES couldn't handle. One notable example regarding this issue is that ''Alfredo and the Fettucini'' and ''Jigsaw'' always crash when you try to load them normally, although most games on the cart start just fine. [[labelnote:Why is that?]]If you open the game ROM by using a hex editor like [=XVI32=], you would discover that both games share the same ''bootup screen''. It's not only the same screen that lets you choose between one or two players, but it also ''executes the game''. Mapper 228 is supposed to overlook that problem, but most emulators and even the NES itself doesn't support it, and it didn't understand the redirection.[[/labelnote]] Of course, ''Action 52'' is already infamous as it is for boasting so many games in one cartridge, and not a single one of them got past ObviousBeta or is even considered acceptable for alpha standards.
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