History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

24th May '18 1:11:34 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros for Wii U's'' DLC was implemented in the form of including ''each and every DLC item'' in the game's patches, forcing you to download all the DLC characters, whether or not you intended to actually buy any of them, if you wanted to play the game online. While this was presumably done so that players wouldn't have to spend time downloading each individual item, it would have been a questionable design choice at the best of times, and could make it impossible for owners of the older, cheaper model with only [=8GB=] of internal storage to even play the game without an external hard drive.
* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' and ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Special Edition'' as of 2017 receive "Creation Club" update where players can purchase exclusive fanmade content from the new Bethesda store service. Like the example above, the update has the game receive all of the Creation Club files whether you intended or not to actually buy any of them. They only appear in the game if successfully bought.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros for Wii U's'' DLC was implemented in the form of including ''each and every DLC item'' in the game's patches, forcing you to download all the DLC characters, whether or not you intended to actually buy any of them, if you wanted to play the game online. While this was presumably done so that players wouldn't have to spend time downloading each individual item, it still would have been a questionable design choice at the best of times, and times like it normally is on other consoles - and, in this case, could make it impossible for owners of the older, cheaper model with only [=8GB=] of internal storage to even play the game without an external hard drive.
* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' and ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Special Edition'' as of 2017 receive are now host to the "Creation Club" update Club", where players can purchase exclusive [[GameMod fanmade content content]] from the new Bethesda store service. Like Already controversial for being, essentially, proof that Bethesda learned nothing from their ill-fated attempt to add a price tag to ''Skyrim'' mods on the example UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} Workshop around April 2015, this one makes itself even worse by, much like the above, the update has the game receive all downloading ''all'' of the Creation Club files whether you intended or not to actually buy any of them. They them or not, and only appear actually giving you that which you pay for. Say what you will about having to carry DLC you don't own on a console that's expected to get by with only 8 gigabytes of space -- with the amount of content that fans create for these games, you can add hard drives in the game if successfully bought.two- to four-''tera''byte range on to their [[TechDemoGame already ridiculous system requirements]].
23rd May '18 1:28:27 PM Meyers07TheTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' and ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Special Edition'' as of 2017 receive "Creation Club" update where players can purchase exclusive fanmade content from the new Bethesda store service. Like the example above, the update has the game receive all of the Creation Club items whether you intended or not to actually buy any of them.

to:

* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' and ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Special Edition'' as of 2017 receive "Creation Club" update where players can purchase exclusive fanmade content from the new Bethesda store service. Like the example above, the update has the game receive all of the Creation Club items files whether you intended or not to actually buy any of them.them. They only appear in the game if successfully bought.
23rd May '18 1:26:13 PM Meyers07TheTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ah, ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'': a beautiful world that rewards creativity, a multiplayer experience like no other, endless exploration to wherever your heart desires, and the uncanny ability to bring modern quadcore computers to their knees. How is this possible? How does a game with graphics so simple they should run fine on a Pentium 2 require a modern gaming box to play at 1080p without stuttering -- let alone if you dare to apply graphic-improving mods? Well, let's just say there's a reason nobody writes 3D games in Java. Luckily, the Windows 10 edition (which is free if you've already bought the Java edition) is written in C++, which is much less resource heavy.

to:

* Ah, ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'': a beautiful world that rewards creativity, a multiplayer experience like no other, endless exploration to wherever your heart desires, and the uncanny ability to bring modern quadcore computers to their knees. How is this possible? How does a game with graphics so simple they should run fine on a Pentium 2 require a modern gaming box to play at 1080p without stuttering -- let alone if you dare to apply graphic-improving mods? Well, let's just say there's a reason almost nobody writes 3D games in Java. Java and the console and mobile version was remade from the ground up. Luckily, the Windows 10 edition (which is free if you've already bought the Java edition) is written in C++, which is based on the mobile version and thus, much less resource heavy.heavy at the cost of GameMod.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' and ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Special Edition'' as of 2017 receive "Creation Club" update where players can purchase exclusive fanmade content from the new Bethesda store service. Like the example above, the update has the game receive all of the Creation Club items whether you intended or not to actually buy any of them.
22nd May '18 3:20:24 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Because of the way Ubisoft's games use this DRM measure, if you were to buy their games on Steam, you need to install [=UPlay=] just to play it. EA's platform Origin, while having their own share of criticisms similar to UPlay and is documented on this page, they had the decency to not sell their games on Steam as they require the service in order to play it.

to:

** Because of the way Ubisoft's games use this DRM measure, if you were to buy their games on Steam, you still need to install [=UPlay=] just and run it with the game to play it. While EA's platform Origin, while having Origin has had their own share of criticisms similar to UPlay and is [=UPlay=], as also documented on this page, they had at least have the decency to not sell continue selling their games on Steam as they that require the service in order to play it.Origin on Steam.



** The "type CD key to install part" is especially hilarious, because you don't need to install -- the game is stored as a folder on a DVD itself, unpacked. As many of the Japanese games actually are. You can just copy this folder to any destination you want.

to:

** The "type CD key to install part" install" part is especially hilarious, because you don't need to install -- the game is stored as a folder on a DVD itself, unpacked. As many of the Japanese games actually are. You can just copy this folder to any destination you want.
19th May '18 2:48:23 PM Knack
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Magicka}}'' is a very fun game, but sometimes it's so difficult to work with that it's ''almost'' not worth the trouble.
** The game takes almost two minutes to start up. That's ''before'' the company logo shows up, too. You just sit there staring at a black screen for two minutes. (Thankfully, you can skip straight to the title screen once the company logos ''do'' start appearing.)
** The graphics are nice, but that's because of its superb art direction. Technology-wise, it's a fairly standard 3D top-down brawler... And yet it chugs down resources like a cutting-edge first-person shooter. A laptop that runs ''Team Fortress 2'' and ''Left 4 Dead'' can't keep up with ''Magicka''.
** If someone's connection drops during a multiplayer game, there is no way for them to re-join. The remaining player(s) must either go on alone, or quit and go back to the lobby.
** The developers acknowledged the game's disastrous launch with a series of blog posts and weeks of patching that made the experience more bearable. Then, with their characteristic and warped sense of humor, they introduced a free DLC called "Mea Culpa" that gave each player character a set of gag items: A "Patched" robe, a "Buggy" Staff, a "Broken" Sword and a "Crash To Desktop" magick.
19th May '18 2:41:49 PM Knack
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}} II'' has fairly simple mechanics due to its nature as an online title released in 2000. That did not prevent Blizzard from introducing bugs in literally every skill tree and about 20% of all skills in the game. Bugs range from the curse resist aura getting weaker as you put points into it and a rapid fire melee attack that misses completely if the first swing misses to masteries claiming to increase damage on spells and items but not actually doing it, Energy Shield bypassing resistances meaning your mana is drained in 2 fireballs, and homing projectiles going invisible if fired from off screen. Lightning bolt spells ignored faster cast rate items for no particular reason. Berserk correctly set your defense to 0 when you used it, then if you used it again it would give you negative defense and after a while it would roll around and give you 8 million defense. Numbers were wildly off on release: the high level Lightning Strike spear skill would do a total of 50 damage at maximum spell level, and the poison from reanimated skeletal mages would do '''1''' damage per second over the course of five minutes. And that's just spells: there were also numerous dupe bugs, ways to teleport to locked maps, the list goes on.
** Infamously the game was only considered difficult for three reasons: about half of the combinations of random enchantments a boss could have would interact in bugged ways and result in an instakill in some way (fun example: the combination fire enchanted/lightning enchanted would erroneously add the (huge) damage from the fire enchanted death explosion to the damage of every single one of the 10+ lightning sparks emitted every single time the boss was struck), the poison clouds of claw vipers would invisibly deliver their melee attack 25 times per second resulting in a RRRRRRR sound and a very quick death, and gloams drain a slight amount of mana on attack but also seem to deal 256 times that amount as damage whenever they hit you with anything.
* ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'' had a particularly funny example of this. When the game launched, the auction house gave you a 5 minute timer to cancel your auctions and beyond that they were stuck in the auction house for two days (A patch was added in the future to allow canceling). The fans found a workaround to cancel their auctions which involved setting your computer's time to the day before you put the auction up and the cancel timer would appear again. Why was it programmed to use your computer's time instead of the Battle.net servers' time we will never know.
19th May '18 8:30:49 AM pgj1997
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SEGA System 16, 18, X, and Capcom System 2 all share a unit nicknamed the "suicide battery", a battery placed on the board that powers RAM that holds essential game data, usually decryption keys for their [=ROMs=] which are encrypted to prevent them from being pirated. If that battery ever dies out, these decryption keys are lost and ''your game will never work again''. This is why you see a lot of arcade enthusiasts retrofitting their machines with an emulator instead, because that battery is just too much of a hassle to deal with.

to:

* SEGA System 16, 18, X, and Capcom System 2 all share a unit nicknamed the "suicide battery", a battery placed on the board that powers RAM that holds essential game data, usually decryption keys for their [=ROMs=] which are encrypted to prevent them from being pirated. If that battery ever dies out, these decryption keys are lost and ''your game will never work again''. This is why you see a lot of arcade enthusiasts retrofitting their machines with an emulator instead, because that battery is just too much of a hassle to deal with.
17th May '18 9:05:35 AM GBAuraRebirth
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Say what you will about EA and Origin, but at least they have the decency to not sell their games on Steam if they want to force people to use their own program instead. You can still buy a Ubisoft game on Steam, but you still need to install [=UPlay=] to play it.

to:

** Say what Because of the way Ubisoft's games use this DRM measure, if you will about EA and were to buy their games on Steam, you need to install [=UPlay=] just to play it. EA's platform Origin, but at least while having their own share of criticisms similar to UPlay and is documented on this page, they have had the decency to not sell their games on Steam if as they want to force people to use their own program instead. You can still buy a Ubisoft game on Steam, but you still need to install [=UPlay=] require the service in order to play it. it.
15th May '18 6:27:33 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/SplinterCellBlacklist'' is plagued with issues, such as poor multiplayer support because people can't seem to connect to one another (and everything goes through Ubisoft's [=UPlay=] service) and where the game's saves are stored. You would think if you regularly back up your saves that they would live in the My Documents folder or the App Data folder. Nope, they live where [=UPlay=] is installed, usually in the Program Files folder. And to make matters even worse, the permissions for the saves folder is left open to anyone. Which wouldn't be a problem... if you don't consider everything in Program Files requires admin privileges to write files into...

to:

* ''VideoGame/SplinterCellBlacklist'' ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Blacklist'' is plagued with issues, such as poor multiplayer support because people can't seem to connect to one another (and everything goes through Ubisoft's [=UPlay=] service) and where the game's saves are stored. You would think if you regularly back up your saves that they would live in the My Documents folder or the App Data folder. Nope, they live where [=UPlay=] is installed, usually in the Program Files folder. And to make matters even worse, the permissions for the saves folder is left open to anyone. Which wouldn't be a problem... if you don't consider everything in Program Files requires admin privileges to write files into...



* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' is apparently a sloppily developed game. It weighs in at a hefty 30GB and requires 4GB of RAM (8GB recommended). You'd think this game would be amazing on all fronts... until you find that the game might be a little bloaty, will happily eat your RAM (it even stutters on the loading movies after the level is done loading), and looks no better than previous installments. Compare this to the TechDemoGame TropeCodifier ''Crysis'' which runs just fine on the recommended requirements (a "wimpy" dual core processor and 2GB of RAM), it just needed a graphics card from its future (and even then, only 2 generations ahead) to run on absolute max settings at 60FPS.
* The online play in ''VideoGame/{{Meteos}} Wars'' did not seem to take lag into account whatsoever: As a FallingBlocks PuzzleGame, it only needs to keep track of the other player's incoming blocks and controller inputs. Instead, it seems to send data between players about the exact locations of every block as they're falling, resulting in much more lag than is necessary. If the connection becomes unstable, instead of taking guesses and correcting itself later, as is seen with all other falling-blocks puzzle games with online play, it just stops the action outright until the signal restabilizes, or terminates the match outright if it's taken more than a few seconds. All the while, as the online play shifts between slow and immobile, the timer counts down in real time, functioning totally independent of the game, resulting in nearly every online match ending in a time-out instead of elimination. Geographic distance seems to profoundly affect the lag too: The closer the opponent is to you, the less lag there is, and it plays almost normally if your opponent is within about 300 kilometers. Inversely, the game is almost unplayable if up against someone from another continent.

to:

* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' is apparently a sloppily developed game. It weighs in at a hefty 30GB and requires 4GB of RAM (8GB recommended). You'd think this game would be amazing on all fronts... until you find that the game might be a little bloaty, will happily eat your RAM (it even stutters on the loading movies after the level is done loading), and looks no better than previous installments. Compare this to the TechDemoGame TropeCodifier ''Crysis'' from just six years prior, which runs just fine on the recommended requirements (a "wimpy" dual core processor and 2GB of RAM), it just needed a graphics card from its future (and [and even then, only 2 generations ahead) ahead] to run on absolute max settings at 60FPS.
60FPS. Later games have gotten even worse about this, the required system specs getting higher and higher for little noticeable graphical improvement - a system that meets the recommended requirements for ''Ghosts'' and will still struggle to run that game at high settings, is barely at the ''minimum'' requirements for ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'', and will constantly crash trying to run the game unless the settings are so low that it looks worse than ''the first game from 2003''.
* The online play in ''VideoGame/{{Meteos}} Wars'' did not seem to take lag into account whatsoever: As a FallingBlocks PuzzleGame, it only needs to keep track of the other player's incoming blocks and controller inputs. Instead, it seems to send data between players about the exact locations of every block as they're falling, resulting in much more lag than is necessary. If the connection becomes unstable, instead of taking guesses and correcting itself later, as is seen with all other falling-blocks puzzle games with online play, it just stops the action outright until the signal restabilizes, or terminates the match outright if it's taken more than a few seconds. All the while, as the online play shifts between slow and immobile, the timer counts down in real time, functioning totally independent of the game, resulting in nearly every online match ending in a time-out instead of elimination. Geographic distance seems to profoundly affect the lag too: The closer the opponent is to you, the less lag there is, and it plays almost normally if your opponent is within about 300 kilometers. Inversely, the game is almost unplayable if up against someone from another continent.
13th May '18 7:40:42 PM wolftickets1969
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Unlike other examples, ''Sqij!'' was intentionally badly programmed: programmer Jason Creighton, who wrote the game when he was 15, was contractually obligated to make a game for publisher The Power House, but after a falling out with the higher-ups, lazily threw together a game so bad he figured The Power House would reject it on the spot. [[SpringtimeForHitler And they published it without looking]]. The game became [[BileFascination notorious]] in the ZX Spectrum community, and comp.sys.sinclair's 'bad game contest' is hosted at sqij.co.uk (now defunct) in tribute to it. The programmer in question later admitted [[OldShame the game was bad and took the whole thing in stride.]]

to:

** Unlike other examples, ''Sqij!'' was intentionally badly programmed: programmer Jason Creighton, who wrote the game when he was 15, was contractually obligated to make a game for publisher The Power House, but after a falling out with the higher-ups, [[AshcanCopy lazily threw together a game so bad he figured The Power House would reject it on the spot. spot.]] [[SpringtimeForHitler And they published it without looking]]. The game became [[BileFascination notorious]] in the ZX Spectrum community, and comp.sys.sinclair's 'bad game contest' is hosted at sqij.co.uk (now defunct) in tribute to it. The programmer in question later admitted [[OldShame the game was bad and took the whole thing in stride.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 1368. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DarthWiki.IdiotProgramming