History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

19th Oct '17 10:29:35 AM MrLavisherMoot
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** Speaking of the 820 chipset, anyone remember [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDRAM RDRAM]]? It was touted by Intel and Rambus as a high performance RAM for the Pentium III to be used in conjunction with the 820. But implementation-wise, it was not up to snuff (in fact benchmarks revealed that applications ran slower with [=RDRAM=] than with the older [=SDRAM=]!), not to mention very expensive, and third party chipset makers (such as [=SiS=], who gained some fame during this era) went to cheaper DDR RAM instead (and begrudgingly, so did Intel, leaving Rambus with egg on their faces), which ultimately became the de facto industry standard. [=RDRAM=] still found use in other applications though (like the Nintendo 64 and the Playstation 2).

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** Speaking of the 820 chipset, anyone remember [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDRAM RDRAM]]? It was touted by Intel and Rambus as a high performance RAM for the Pentium III to be used in conjunction with the 820. But implementation-wise, it was not up to snuff (in fact benchmarks revealed that applications ran slower with [=RDRAM=] than with the older [=SDRAM=]!), not to mention very expensive, and third party chipset makers (such as [=SiS=], who gained some fame during this era) went to cheaper DDR RAM instead (and begrudgingly, so did Intel, leaving Rambus with egg on their faces), which ultimately became the de facto industry standard. [=RDRAM=] still found use in other applications though (like the Nintendo 64 and the Playstation [=PlayStation=] 2).



* Still Sony: the UsefulNotes/Playstation3. A firmware bug in which some models believed that 2010 was a leap year resulted in lockouts on ''single player'' games due to the machine refusing to connect to the [=PlayStation Network=]. What was the reason for this system having such a perilous dependency on the judgement of its system clock? [[http://lpar.ath0.com/2010/03/02/8001050f/ DRM!]]

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* Still Sony: the UsefulNotes/Playstation3. UsefulNotes/PlayStation3. A firmware bug in which some models believed that 2010 was a leap year resulted in lockouts on ''single player'' games due to the machine refusing to connect to the [=PlayStation Network=].[=PlayStation=] Network. What was the reason for this system having such a perilous dependency on the judgement of its system clock? [[http://lpar.ath0.com/2010/03/02/8001050f/ DRM!]]



** The original Playstation wasn't exempt from issues either. The original Series 1000 units and later Series 3000 units (which converted the 1000's A/V RCA ports to a proprietary A/V port) had the laser reader array at 9 o'clock on the tray. This put it directly adjacent to the power supply, which ran exceptionally hot. Result: the reader lens would warp, causing the system to fail spectacularly and requiring a new unit. Sony admitted this design flaw existed... ''after'' all warranties on the 1000 and 3000 units were up and the Series 5000 with the reader array at 2 o'clock was on the market.

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** The original Playstation UsefulNotes/PlayStation wasn't exempt from issues either. The original Series 1000 units and later Series 3000 units (which converted the 1000's A/V RCA ports to a proprietary A/V port) had the laser reader array at 9 o'clock on the tray. This put it directly adjacent to the power supply, which ran exceptionally hot. Result: the reader lens would warp, causing the system to fail spectacularly and requiring a new unit. Sony admitted this design flaw existed... ''after'' all warranties on the 1000 and 3000 units were up and the Series 5000 with the reader array at 2 o'clock was on the market.



*** The heat sink was a lot larger but shrunk to make room for the DVD drive, and apparently no more significant testing was performed after making a risky design choice like that. A more plausible explanation is that the solder joints weren't very reliable under repeated thermal stress, and eventually they crack. The same thing happens to first generation UsefulNotes/Playstation3 models (the Yellow Light of Death), albeit much later. Whoever was commissioned to do the assembly of both the 360 and [=PS3=] must've had a grudge.[[note]]A common explanation is that no one knew how to use or handle lead-free solder. It was new at the time, you see. Although, there is some blame to be assigned to the crappy solder...[[/note]]

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*** The heat sink was a lot larger but shrunk to make room for the DVD drive, and apparently no more significant testing was performed after making a risky design choice like that. A more plausible explanation is that the solder joints weren't very reliable under repeated thermal stress, and eventually they crack. The same thing happens to first generation UsefulNotes/Playstation3 UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 models (the Yellow Light of Death), albeit much later. Whoever was commissioned to do the assembly of both the 360 and [=PS3=] must've had a grudge.[[note]]A common explanation is that no one knew how to use or handle lead-free solder. It was new at the time, you see. Although, there is some blame to be assigned to the crappy solder...[[/note]]
19th Oct '17 8:45:50 AM pgj1997
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** The Microsoft Word macro virus Odious [[https://youtu.be/f1EUHNQa3EA had the same problem]].

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** The Microsoft Word macro virus [=Virus.MSWord.Odious =] [[https://youtu.be/f1EUHNQa3EA had the same problem]].
19th Oct '17 5:59:55 AM Fallingwater
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Added DiffLines:

** Fast forward to the end of 2017 and the Nexus 5X, made by LG and running the Snapdragon 808, is causing more and more complaints of unrecoverable bootloops. The reason? Two of the CPU's six cores - the powerful ones - spontaneously die, for reasons not well understood. Under certain circumstances the phone can be modified so as to run entirely on the remaining four low-power cores; the performance takes a hit, but at least you're not left with a brick. Until, of course, the low-power cores die too, which has been known to happen. You'd think LG would have learned...
17th Oct '17 12:25:47 PM Clegginator
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** [=McAfee's=] strength is that it blocks everything that might be a threat...which is also its main weakness. If you wish to use a program that it considers a threat (and as of this writing, it considers ''VideoGame/DhuxsScar'' and ''VideoGame/SonicMania'', among other things, to be such a program), you cannot get it to grant an exception. You're supposed to send [=McAfee's=] developers an email telling them it's a false alarm. If they don't respond, you need to disable [=McAfee=] every time you want to use the program.

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** [=McAfee's=] strength is that it blocks everything that might be a threat...which is also its main weakness. If you wish to use a program that it considers a threat (and as of this writing, it considers ''VideoGame/DhuxsScar'' and ''VideoGame/SonicMania'', among other things, to be such a program), programs), you cannot get it to grant an exception. You're supposed to send [=McAfee's=] developers an email telling them it's a false alarm. If they don't respond, you need to disable [=McAfee=] every time you want to use the program.
17th Oct '17 12:25:08 PM Clegginator
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** [=McAfee's=] strength is that it blocks everything that might be a threat...which is also its main weakness. If you wish to use a program that it considers a threat (and as of this writing, it considers ''VideoGame/DhuxsScar'', among other things, to be such a program), you cannot get it to grant an exception. You're supposed to send [=McAfee's=] developers an email telling them it's a false alarm. If they don't respond, you need to disable [=McAfee=] every time you want to use the program.

to:

** [=McAfee's=] strength is that it blocks everything that might be a threat...which is also its main weakness. If you wish to use a program that it considers a threat (and as of this writing, it considers ''VideoGame/DhuxsScar'', ''VideoGame/DhuxsScar'' and ''VideoGame/SonicMania'', among other things, to be such a program), you cannot get it to grant an exception. You're supposed to send [=McAfee's=] developers an email telling them it's a false alarm. If they don't respond, you need to disable [=McAfee=] every time you want to use the program.
12th Oct '17 7:54:54 AM OlfinBedwere
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* The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrary Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed these vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did. In fact, the only thing these updates did on that matter is simply remove anything that was installed ''with'' these vulnerabilities - nothing's stopping you from using these vulnerabilities again to ''re''-install them.
* While the UsefulNotes/WiiU ultimately proved a failure for several reasons, poor component choices helped contribute to its near-total lack of third-party support. It'd only be a slight exaggeration to say that the system's CPU was essentially just three Wii [=CPUs=] -- and by extension, three ''UsefulNotes/GameCube'' [=CPUs=] -- heavily overclocked and slapped together on the same die, with performance that was abysmally poor by 2012 standards. Its GPU, while not ''as'' slow, wasn't all that much faster than those of the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360, and used a shader model in-between those of the older consoles and their successors, meaning that ported [=PS3=]/360 games didn't take advantage of the newer hardware, while games designed for the [=PS4=] and Xbox One wouldn't even work to begin with due to the lack of necessary feature support. The system would likely have fared much better if Nintendo had just grabbed an off-the-shelf AMD laptop APU -- which had enough power even in 2012 to brute-force emulate the Wii, eliminating the main reason to keep with the [=PowerPC=] line -- stuffed it into a Wii case and called it a day. Fortunately Nintendo actually seem to have learned from this, basing the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch on an existing [=nVidia=] mobile chip which thus far has proven surprisingly capable of punching above its weight.

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* ** The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrary Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed these vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did. In fact, the only thing these updates did on that matter is simply remove anything that was installed ''with'' these vulnerabilities - nothing's stopping you from using these vulnerabilities again to ''re''-install them.
* ** While the UsefulNotes/WiiU ultimately proved a failure for several reasons, poor component choices helped contribute to its near-total lack of third-party support. It'd only be a slight exaggeration to say that the system's CPU was essentially just three Wii [=CPUs=] -- and by extension, three ''UsefulNotes/GameCube'' [=CPUs=] -- heavily overclocked and slapped together on the same die, with performance that was abysmally poor by 2012 standards. Its GPU, while not ''as'' slow, wasn't all that much faster than those of the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360, and used a shader model in-between those of the older consoles and their successors, meaning that ported [=PS3=]/360 games didn't take advantage of the newer hardware, while games designed for the [=PS4=] and Xbox One wouldn't even work to begin with due to the lack of necessary feature support. The system would likely have fared much better if Nintendo had just grabbed an off-the-shelf AMD laptop APU -- which had enough power even in 2012 to brute-force emulate the Wii, eliminating the main reason to keep with the [=PowerPC=] line -- stuffed it into a Wii case and called it a day. Fortunately Nintendo actually seem to have learned from this, basing the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch on an existing [=nVidia=] mobile chip which thus far has proven surprisingly capable of punching above its weight.
11th Oct '17 8:33:10 PM Josef5678
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* When ''VideoGame/NightsOfAzure'' was [[PortingDisaster ported to PC]], the developers didn't include the option to ''close the game'', requiring users to force-quit it from outside the program. This is one of the most basic features any game should have, yet they didn't bother to code it in. Also, if you're keyboard user, ''Azure'' and ''VideoGame/AtelierSophieTheAlchemistOfTheMysteriousBook'' has no options to rebind keys. If that's not bad enough, the game doesn't even bother to tell which key does what!

to:

* When ''VideoGame/NightsOfAzure'' was [[PortingDisaster ported to PC]], the developers didn't include the option to ''close the game'', requiring users to force-quit it from outside the program. This is one of the most basic features any game should have, yet they didn't bother to code it in. Also, if you're a keyboard user, ''Azure'' and ''VideoGame/AtelierSophieTheAlchemistOfTheMysteriousBook'' has no options to rebind keys. If that's not bad enough, the game doesn't even bother to tell which key does what!
9th Oct '17 9:44:54 PM onyhow
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* When ''VideoGame/NightsOfAzure'' was [[PortingDisaster ported to PC]], the developers didn't include the option to ''close the game'', requiring users to force-quit it from outside the program. This is one of the most basic features any game should have, yet they didn't bother to code it in.

to:

* When ''VideoGame/NightsOfAzure'' was [[PortingDisaster ported to PC]], the developers didn't include the option to ''close the game'', requiring users to force-quit it from outside the program. This is one of the most basic features any game should have, yet they didn't bother to code it in. Also, if you're keyboard user, ''Azure'' and ''VideoGame/AtelierSophieTheAlchemistOfTheMysteriousBook'' has no options to rebind keys. If that's not bad enough, the game doesn't even bother to tell which key does what!
8th Oct '17 12:31:11 PM Kadorhal
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* Apple's made a big mistake with one of their generations of the [=iPhone=]. Depending on how you held it, it could not ''receive signals''. The iPhone 4's antenna is integrated into its outside design and is a bare, unpainted aluminum strip around its edge, with a small gap somewhere along the way. To get a good signal strength it relies on this gap being open, but if you hold the phone wrong (which "accidentally" happens to be the most comfortable way to do so, especially if you're left-handed), your palm covers that gap and, if it's in the least bit damp, ''shorts'' it, rendering the antenna completely useless. Lacquering the outside of antenna, or simply moving the air gap a bit so it doesn't get shorted by the user's hand, would've solved the problem in a breeze, but, apparently, Apple is much more concerned about its "product identity" than about its users. Apple [[NeverMyFault suggested users to "hold it right"]]. As it turns out, Apple would soon be selling modification kits for $25 a pop, for an issue that, by all standards, should have been fixed for free. Apple got sued from at least 3 major sources for scam due to this.

to:

* Apple's made a big mistake with one of their generations of the [=iPhone=]. Depending on how you held it, it could not ''receive signals''. The iPhone 4's antenna is integrated into its outside design and is a bare, unpainted aluminum strip around its edge, with a small gap somewhere along the way. To get a good signal strength it relies on this gap being open, but if you hold the phone wrong (which "accidentally" happens to be the most comfortable way to do so, especially if you're left-handed), your palm covers that gap and, if it's in the least bit damp, ''shorts'' it, rendering the antenna completely useless. Lacquering the outside of antenna, or simply moving the air gap a bit so it doesn't get shorted by the user's hand, would've solved the problem in a breeze, but, apparently, Apple is much more concerned about its "product identity" than about its users. Apple [[NeverMyFault suggested users to "hold it right"]]. As it turns out, Apple would soon be selling modification kits for $25 a pop, for an issue that, by all standards, should have been fixed for free.free, or even before the product hit the market. Apple got sued from at least 3 major sources for scam due to this.



* The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrary Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed these vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did. In fact, the only thing these updates did on that matter is simply remove anything that was installed ''with'' these vulnerabilities. And nothing's stopping you from using these vulnerabilities again to re-install them

to:

* The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrary Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed these vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did. In fact, the only thing these updates did on that matter is simply remove anything that was installed ''with'' these vulnerabilities. And vulnerabilities - nothing's stopping you from using these vulnerabilities again to re-install them''re''-install them.
7th Oct '17 7:52:59 PM pgj1997
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* The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrarily Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did.

to:

* The Wii literally has no crash handler. So if you manage to crash your system, you open it up to Arbitrarily Arbitrary Code Execution, and a whole load of security vulnerabilities awaits you. Do you have an SD card inserted? Well, crash any game that reads and writes to it, and even ''more'' vulnerabilities open up. They'll tell you that they've fixed these vulnerabilities though system updates, but in reality, they never did.did. In fact, the only thing these updates did on that matter is simply remove anything that was installed ''with'' these vulnerabilities. And nothing's stopping you from using these vulnerabilities again to re-install them
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