History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

16th Jan '18 2:53:11 AM hyphz
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** How they managed it is actually quite interesting. High Sierra upgraded the database format used to store logins. The system was written so that when a user tried to log in, it'd first look for their login in the new database; if it wasn't found there, try the old database, and if found there and the password is right, copy the data into the new database for next time. The problem? While it checked that the password was right before migrating the account, it didn't allow for the account being ''disabled'', which the "root" account is by default on MacOS. So the old database returns an error that the account is disabled, but then - since it ''didn't'' return that the password was wrong - the migration process created an account with no password in the new database the first time a login was attempted - and then accepted it the second time.

to:

** How they managed it is actually quite interesting. High Sierra upgraded the database format used to store logins. The system was written so that when a user tried to log in, it'd first look for their login in the new database; if it wasn't found there, try the old database, and if found there and the password is right, copy the data into the new database for next time. The problem? While it checked that the password was right before migrating the account, it didn't allow for the account being ''disabled'', which the "root" account is by default on MacOS. So the old database returns an error that the account is disabled, but then - since it ''didn't'' return that the password ''password was wrong wrong'' - the migration process created an account with no password in the new database the first time a root login was attempted - attempted, and then accepted it the second time.
16th Jan '18 2:50:45 AM hyphz
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** How they managed it is actually quite interesting. High Sierra upgraded the database format used to store logins. The system was written so that when a user tried to log in, first look for their login in the new database; if it's not there, look for it in the old database, and if the password is right, copy the data into the new database for next time. The problem? While it checked that the password was right before migrating the account, it didn't allow for the account being ''disabled'', which the "root" account is by default on MacOS. So the old database returns that the account is disabled, but the migration program only knew that the answer wasn't "password wrong", so it created an account with no password in the new database the first time a login was attempted - and then accepted it the second time.

to:

** How they managed it is actually quite interesting. High Sierra upgraded the database format used to store logins. The system was written so that when a user tried to log in, it'd first look for their login in the new database; if it's not it wasn't found there, look for it in try the old database, and if found there and the password is right, copy the data into the new database for next time. The problem? While it checked that the password was right before migrating the account, it didn't allow for the account being ''disabled'', which the "root" account is by default on MacOS. So the old database returns an error that the account is disabled, but then - since it ''didn't'' return that the password was wrong - the migration program only knew that the answer wasn't "password wrong", so it process created an account with no password in the new database the first time a login was attempted - and then accepted it the second time.
16th Jan '18 2:45:58 AM hyphz
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Added DiffLines:

** How they managed it is actually quite interesting. High Sierra upgraded the database format used to store logins. The system was written so that when a user tried to log in, first look for their login in the new database; if it's not there, look for it in the old database, and if the password is right, copy the data into the new database for next time. The problem? While it checked that the password was right before migrating the account, it didn't allow for the account being ''disabled'', which the "root" account is by default on MacOS. So the old database returns that the account is disabled, but the migration program only knew that the answer wasn't "password wrong", so it created an account with no password in the new database the first time a login was attempted - and then accepted it the second time.
14th Jan '18 6:32:13 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for the MATE desktop) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' - just Google "Caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files". The same program, for reasons only known to the gods of computing, will often disable even on local hard drives the commands to copy, move, rename, or delete files.

to:

* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for the MATE desktop) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' - just Google "Caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files". The same program, for reasons only known to the gods of computing, will often disable even on local hard drives the commands to copy, move, rename, or delete files.files forcing to kill and restart it.
14th Jan '18 6:30:53 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for the MATE desktop) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' - just Google "Caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files".

to:

* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for the MATE desktop) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' - just Google "Caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files". The same program, for reasons only known to the gods of computing, will often disable even on local hard drives the commands to copy, move, rename, or delete files.
11th Jan '18 2:33:31 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** This appears to be caused by the way Twitter handles pictures. When you click an image in your twitter feed, it appends ":large" to the URL ([[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg:large example]]). Some browsers have no idea how to handle this (Chrome will try to name the example [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large"=], while Firefox will try to name it [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg%20large"=]). Other sites that use URL postfixes can have similar problems.

to:

** This appears to be caused by the way Twitter handles pictures. When you click an image in your twitter feed, it appends ":large" to the URL ([[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg:large example]]). Some browsers have no idea how to handle this (Chrome will try to name the example [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg-large"=], while older versions of Firefox [[note]][as of version 57, it names it [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg"=]][[/note]] will try to name it [="C92VACaV0AAZG7V.jpg large.jpg%20large"=]). Other sites that use URL postfixes can have similar problems.
2nd Jan '18 6:01:23 PM NightShade96
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* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for Linux Mint) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' -just google "caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files".

to:

* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or its fork "Caja" for Linux Mint) the MATE desktop) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' -just google "caja - just Google "Caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files".
2nd Jan '18 10:54:38 AM Malady
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* ''Sqij!'' for the ZX Spectrum has been described by Creator/StuartAshen as the worst game ever made, even worse than the usual contenders like ''VideoGame/BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. The game's code forces Caps Lock to be on, but the game only accepts lower-case inputs, meaning you can't do anything without manually exiting the game to switch Caps Lock off. Even if you do manage to get it working, you learn that the game is constant stream of collateral damage. To give a couple of examples:

to:

* ''Sqij!'' for the ZX Spectrum has been described by Creator/StuartAshen as the worst game ever made, even worse than the usual contenders like ''VideoGame/BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. The game's code forces Caps Lock to be on, but the game only accepts lower-case inputs, meaning you can't do anything without manually exiting the game to switch Caps Lock off. Even if you do manage to get it working, you learn that the game is a constant stream of collateral damage. To give a couple of examples:



** The game is also notoriously slow, as it's written in Laser Basic, which uses standard ZX Spectrum basic for most processing. There are also some peculiar decisions made as to what should be done every frame. This isn't a direct insult to how badly the game plays in Laser Basic, as there ARE some good games written in the extension, but to make matter worse on why this got really bad...

to:

** The game is also notoriously slow, as it's written in Laser Basic, which uses standard ZX Spectrum basic for most processing. There are also some peculiar decisions made as to what should be done every frame. This isn't a direct insult to how badly the game plays in Laser Basic, as there ARE some good games written in the extension, but to make matter matters worse on why this got really bad...bad:
2nd Jan '18 10:39:41 AM GBAuraRebirth
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* ''Sqij!'' for the ZX Spectrum has been described by Creator/StuartAshen as the worst game ever made, even worse than the usual contenders like ''VideoGame/BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. The game's code forces Caps Lock to be on, but the game only accepts lower-case inputs, meaning you can't do anything without manually exiting the game to switch Caps Lock off. Even if you do manage to get it working, you learn that the game is constant stream of collateral damage, even if you go as far as to ''patch the source code to fix the bugs''. To give a couple of examples:

to:

* ''Sqij!'' for the ZX Spectrum has been described by Creator/StuartAshen as the worst game ever made, even worse than the usual contenders like ''VideoGame/BigRigsOverTheRoadRacing''. The game's code forces Caps Lock to be on, but the game only accepts lower-case inputs, meaning you can't do anything without manually exiting the game to switch Caps Lock off. Even if you do manage to get it working, you learn that the game is constant stream of collateral damage, even if you go as far as to ''patch the source code to fix the bugs''.damage. To give a couple of examples:



** The game is also notoriously slow, as it's written in Laser Basic, which uses standard ZX Spectrum basic for most processing. There are also some peculiar decisions made as to what should be done every frame.
** As a side effect of the horrendous coding, loading the game also loads the full binaries for Laser Basic, the BASIC extension used to write the game. By quitting the game you can then use this yourself, meaning the game contains a full, illegally pirated version of a £14.99 software utility. Despite this, its publisher released it '''twice''' -- once on its own, once as part of a compilation without taking the program out. Due to this, distributing and owning a physical copy of the game is ''technically illegal''.

to:

** The game is also notoriously slow, as it's written in Laser Basic, which uses standard ZX Spectrum basic for most processing. There are also some peculiar decisions made as to what should be done every frame.
** As
frame. This isn't a side effect of direct insult to how badly the horrendous coding, game plays in Laser Basic, as there ARE some good games written in the extension, but to make matter worse on why this got really bad...
** The developer forgot to encrypt the game before it was finished, this means that
loading the game also loads the full binaries for Laser Basic, the BASIC extension used to write the game. By quitting the game you can then use this yourself, meaning the game contains a full, illegally pirated version of a £14.99 software utility. Despite this, its publisher released it '''twice''' -- once on its own, once as part of a compilation without taking fixing the program out.problem. Due to this, distributing and owning a physical copy of the game is ''technically illegal''.
30th Dec '17 5:02:12 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or their fork caja for Linux Mint) has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' -just google "caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files".

to:

* Some programs that come shipped with Linux distros often leave a lot to be desired. The file manager Nautilus (or their its fork caja "Caja" for Linux Mint) used for GNOME-based desktops has (or at least had) a nasty habit to freeze without warning when moving or copying files, not just large file transfers, and often being even able to lock up ''the entire system'' -just google "caja (or Nautilus) freezes copying files".
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