History DarthWiki / IdiotProgramming

13th Feb '16 10:57:17 AM Fallingwater
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* The Commodore 64, one of the most popular computers of all time, wasn't without its share of problems. Perhaps the most widely known is its ''extreme'' slowness at loading programs. This couldn't really be helped with a storage medium like tape, which remained slow even after various clever solutions to speed it up, but floppy disks really ought to have been faster. What happened was that Commodore had devised a hardware-accelerated system for transferring data that worked fairly well, but then also found a hardware bug in the input/output chip that made it work not at all. Replacing the buggy chips was economically unfeasible, so the whole thing was revised to work entirely in software. This slowed down drive access immensely, and caused the birth of a cottage industry for replacement drive controllers that did what the Commodore original couldn't.
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* The Commodore 64, one of the most popular computers of all time, wasn't without its share of problems. Perhaps the most widely known is its ''extreme'' slowness at loading programs. This couldn't really be helped with a storage medium like tape, which remained slow even after various clever solutions to speed it up, but floppy disks really ought to have been faster. What happened was that Commodore had devised a hardware-accelerated system for transferring data that worked fairly well, but then also found a hardware bug in the input/output chip that made it work not at all. Replacing the buggy chips was economically unfeasible, so the whole thing was revised to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_banging work entirely in software.software]]. This slowed down drive access immensely, and caused the birth of a cottage industry for replacement drive controllers that did what the Commodore original couldn't.
11th Feb '16 12:38:52 PM CountDorku
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* Website/GOGDotCom's "Galaxy" client has certain issues with download size (namely getting it wrong) and download speed (roughly comparable to having the code yelled at you over the phone and programming it yourself). For example, take the Diamond edition of ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''. This comes to about 2.5GB, a maximum of 3 if you count all the music and avatars and so on that come as freebies. Galaxy will report the game size as being 5GB. It will then take an obscenely long time to download that 5GB; on a connection where Origin can get a game of that size downloaded within an eight hour period, Galaxy will take twelve. Read that again: 12 hours to download all five gigabytes of a three-gigabyte game. Thankfully you can just download games directly from your account on the site and save time, frustration and bandwidth.
8th Feb '16 11:44:06 AM Taxi-Pizzatime
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* Windows 10 is getting better with updates, but the System Restore feature still needs help. If you ever need to roll back the system, there is no indication that the available restore points are usable until you attempt to use it. Maybe it is anti-virus software misbehaving, but it can be like flipping a coin to see if your restore point works. Chances are, you've tried rolling back the system only for the system to reboot and Windows to notify that your system has '''not''' been changed and the restore point failed. You may as well just ignore System Restore and just use Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7) to save a drive image to a removable medium and create an emergency boot DVD and use that for when your computer goes insane.
6th Feb '16 11:27:45 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
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* The IBM Deskstar 75GXP, nicknamed the [[FanNickname Death Star]]. While it was a large drive by year-2000 standards, it had a disturbing habit of suddenly failing, taking your data with it. The magnetic coating was of subpar reliability, and came loose easily, causing head crashing that easily strips the magnetic layer off clean. One user with a RAID server setup reported to their RAID controller manufacturer; supposedly, this user was replacing their IBM deskstars [[http://s3.computerhistory.org/groups/ds-ibm-75gxp-family-20121031.pdf at a rate of 600-800 drives PER DAY!]]
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* The IBM Deskstar 75GXP, nicknamed the [[FanNickname Death Star]]. While it was a large drive by year-2000 standards, it had a disturbing habit of suddenly failing, taking your data with it. The magnetic coating was of subpar reliability, and came loose easily, causing head crashing that easily strips the magnetic layer off clean. One user with a RAID server setup reported to their RAID controller manufacturer; supposedly, this user was replacing their IBM deskstars [[http://s3.computerhistory.org/groups/ds-ibm-75gxp-family-20121031.pdf at a rate of 600-800 drives PER DAY!]]per day]]. There have been many hard drives that have been criticized for various reasons, but the "Death Star" was something truly spectacular for all the wrong reasons.
6th Feb '16 11:22:36 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
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* The IBM Deskstar 75GXP, nicknamed the [[FanNickname Death Star]]. While it was a large drive by year-2000 standards, it had a disturbing habit of suddenly failing, taking your data with it. The magnetic coating was of subpar reliability, and came loose easily, causing head crashing that easily strips the magnetic layer off clean. One user with a RAID server setup reported to their RAID controller manufacturer; supposedly, this user was replacing their IBM deskstars [[http://www.computerhistory.org/groups/storagesig/media/docs/DS_IBM%2075GXP%20Family_20121031.pdf at a rate of 600-800 drives PER DAY!]]
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* The IBM Deskstar 75GXP, nicknamed the [[FanNickname Death Star]]. While it was a large drive by year-2000 standards, it had a disturbing habit of suddenly failing, taking your data with it. The magnetic coating was of subpar reliability, and came loose easily, causing head crashing that easily strips the magnetic layer off clean. One user with a RAID server setup reported to their RAID controller manufacturer; supposedly, this user was replacing their IBM deskstars [[http://www.[[http://s3.computerhistory.org/groups/storagesig/media/docs/DS_IBM%2075GXP%20Family_20121031.org/groups/ds-ibm-75gxp-family-20121031.pdf at a rate of 600-800 drives PER DAY!]]
4th Feb '16 6:25:24 AM hyphz
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* The Playstation 4 seems to have an issue with the capacitive sensor in its disc eject button. Over time it tends to spuriously activate, leaving the console spitting out discs and then refusing to allow them back in, making it impossible to play any game that comes on a disc. The only official Sony solution? Replace the entire console under warranty, or buy a new one. Never mind that simply adding a software patch allowing the user to tell the software not to pay attention to the hardware button would be easy and fine (it's not a mechanical system and when you want to eject a disk it can be done through the system menus).
29th Jan '16 8:21:22 AM JudasZala
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* The "Prescott" core Pentium 4 has a reputation for being pretty much the worst CPU design in history. It had some design trade-offs which lessened the processor's performance-per-clock over the original Pentium 4 design, but theoretically allowed the Prescott to run at much higher clockspeeds. Unfortunately, these changes also made the Prescott vastly ''hotter'' than the original design, making it impossible for Intel to actually achieve the clockspeeds they wanted. Moreover, they totally bottlenecked the processor's performance, meaning that Intel's usual performance increasing tricks (more cache and faster system buses) did nothing to help. By the time Intel came up with a new processor that put them back in the lead, the once hugely valuable "Pentium" brand had been rendered utterly worthless by the whole Prescott fiasco, and the new processor was instead called the Core 2. The Pentium name is still in use, but is applied to the fairly stripped-down, low-end processors that Intel puts out for cheap computers.
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* The "Prescott" core Pentium 4 has a reputation for being pretty much the worst CPU design in history. It had some design trade-offs which lessened the processor's performance-per-clock over the original Pentium 4 design, but theoretically allowed the Prescott to run at much higher clockspeeds. Unfortunately, these changes also made the Prescott vastly ''hotter'' than the original design, making it impossible for Intel to actually achieve the clockspeeds they wanted. Moreover, they totally bottlenecked the processor's performance, meaning that Intel's usual performance increasing tricks (more cache and faster system buses) did nothing to help. By the time Intel came up with a new processor that put them back in the lead, the once hugely valuable "Pentium" brand had been rendered utterly worthless by the whole Prescott fiasco, and the new processor was instead called the Core 2. The Pentium name is still in use, but is [[DemotedToExtra applied to the fairly stripped-down, low-end processors that Intel puts out for cheap computers.computers]].
29th Jan '16 3:46:55 AM bwburke94
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If you're being so blatant with your product placement, I'm just going to keep removing it.
* Norton was once the ultimate antivirus software, and the standard the others aspired to. Then they decided to focus on anti-piracy. The result: The virus scanner hardly works, and even when it does, the virus discovered cannot be expunged, in most cases. For this, Norton now has the ultimate pirate defense: it's such an awful program, anyone knowledgeable enough to pirate software is going to get the paid, more feature-rich version of a program with a free version like [[ProductPlacement avast!]], or just go the legal route and get either the free versions of either of those or the newer Microsoft Security Essentials, which are all free, yet somehow still far better than Norton.
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* Norton was once the ultimate antivirus software, and the standard the others aspired to. Then they decided to focus on anti-piracy. The result: The virus scanner hardly works, and even when it does, the virus discovered cannot be expunged, in most cases. For this, Norton now has the ultimate pirate defense: it's such an awful program, anyone knowledgeable enough to pirate software is going to get the paid, more feature-rich version of a program with a free version like [[ProductPlacement avast!]], version, or just go the legal route and get either the free versions of either of those or the newer Microsoft Security Essentials, which are all free, yet somehow still far better than Norton.
20th Jan '16 4:49:23 PM nombretomado
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* Games for Windows Live was Microsoft's attempt to take on {{Steam}}, and given Microsoft's sheer resources, many thought they would have some success in this. To put it lightly, however...they didn't. Poor design choices all around meant that it never attracted many users, and was eventually discontinued in August 2013, to be replaced by an integrated app store in Windows 8 -- and for all that OS's faults, the app store sensibly decided to target casual games, a market which Steam and the others haven't exploited as much. As for why the GFWL marketplace was discontinued:
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* Games for Windows Live was Microsoft's attempt to take on {{Steam}}, UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, and given Microsoft's sheer resources, many thought they would have some success in this. To put it lightly, however...they didn't. Poor design choices all around meant that it never attracted many users, and was eventually discontinued in August 2013, to be replaced by an integrated app store in Windows 8 -- and for all that OS's faults, the app store sensibly decided to target casual games, a market which Steam and the others haven't exploited as much. As for why the GFWL marketplace was discontinued:

* A misconfiguration in Creator/{{Steam}}'s caching on Christmas Day 2015 let logged-in users briefly see other people's accounts. Caching pages for logged-in users is another big security no-no.
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* A misconfiguration in Creator/{{Steam}}'s UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}'s caching on Christmas Day 2015 let logged-in users briefly see other people's accounts. Caching pages for logged-in users is another big security no-no.

* ''Zero Gear'' isn't problematic in and of itself... but the nature of its {{Steam}} integration allows it to be used to play any Steam-locked game you want, without owning the game. This is most notably used by hackers to bypass VAC bans: just start a new account, download the ''Zero Gear'' demo, and copy the files over.
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* ''Zero Gear'' isn't problematic in and of itself... but the nature of its {{Steam}} UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} integration allows it to be used to play any Steam-locked game you want, without owning the game. This is most notably used by hackers to bypass VAC bans: just start a new account, download the ''Zero Gear'' demo, and copy the files over.

* Even {{Steam}} is not immune to this. If you haven't run it in a while, you may discover that it's trapped in an infinite loop: it attempts to update itself, but aborts partway through because your internet connection faltered for a few milliseconds, and it quits without saving what it's already downloaded. [[Catch22Dilemma You can't run Steam because it needs an update, and you can't update Steam because you can't run it.]] You'd think the solution would be to download the update outside of Steam, but Valve doesn't provide any way to do so.
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* Even {{Steam}} UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} is not immune to this. If you haven't run it in a while, you may discover that it's trapped in an infinite loop: it attempts to update itself, but aborts partway through because your internet connection faltered for a few milliseconds, and it quits without saving what it's already downloaded. [[Catch22Dilemma You can't run Steam because it needs an update, and you can't update Steam because you can't run it.]] You'd think the solution would be to download the update outside of Steam, but Valve doesn't provide any way to do so.
17th Jan '16 6:53:54 PM Everdream
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* VideoGame/BanzaiPecan: The Last Hope for the Young Century is not without its problems, however none were as egregious as the palette-swap feature for its main character. Without using them, the game usually takes roughly 4 seconds to load the game, but if you use any of the palette-swaps (save for her [[spoiler:[[SuperMode Awakened Mode]]]]), it extends the load times from 4 to nearly '''16''' seconds. What makes this even more ironic is that the game can load the most basic enemy type the game in many other colors without any issues. * VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV: The i386, Microsoft Windows, port of the game is commonly cited as an example of this trope before patches were released. Dog-slow performance on the most commonly available computers of the time, and a graphical settings menu where setting the quality to low actually made the game run ''slower''. True, patches help alleviate theses problems, and the game engine boasts its share of [[GameMod game mods]], but the game became a textbook example of [[PortingDisaster shoddy PC ports.]] Also, the game required the infamous ''Games For Windows'', a program that is discussed in Microsoft section of this page.
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* VideoGame/BanzaiPecan: ''VideoGame/BanzaiPecan: The Last Hope for the Young Century Century'' is not without its problems, however none were as egregious as the palette-swap feature for its main character. Without using them, the game usually takes roughly 4 seconds to load the game, but if you use any of the palette-swaps (save for her [[spoiler:[[SuperMode Awakened Mode]]]]), it extends the load times from 4 to nearly '''16''' seconds. What makes this even more ironic is that the game can load the most basic enemy type the game in many other colors without any issues. * VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV: ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV:'' The i386, Microsoft Windows, port of the game is commonly cited as an example of this trope before patches were released. Dog-slow performance on the most commonly available computers of the time, and a graphical settings menu where setting the quality to low actually made the game run ''slower''. True, patches help alleviate theses problems, and the game engine boasts its share of [[GameMod game mods]], but the game became a textbook example of [[PortingDisaster shoddy PC ports.]] Also, the game required the infamous ''Games For Windows'', a program that is discussed in Microsoft section of this page.
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