History DanBrowned / DanBrown

28th Mar '17 1:55:08 AM Amon_Ra
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* The novel mentions special "improvised munitions"óweapons that are capable of firing water at sufficient speed to shatter bones or turn sand or ice into bullets. In reality, "Improvised Munitions" in military jargon means something else entirely, and of those possibilities mentioned, only the first one is feasible; water bullets are used in bomb disposal since it is incompressible and a poor conductor of electricity. Turning sand into glass bullets, however, would require a power source too big to conveniently carry and ice bullets were shown to be ineffective. [[AC:[[http://mythbustersresults.com/episode1 Mythbusters]]]].

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* The novel mentions special "improvised munitions"óweapons that are capable of firing water at sufficient speed to shatter bones or turn sand or ice into bullets. In reality, "Improvised Munitions" in military jargon technical language means something else entirely, and of those possibilities mentioned, only the first one is feasible; possible; water bullets are used in bomb disposal since it is incompressible and a poor conductor of electricity. Turning sand into glass bullets, however, would require a power source too big to conveniently carry and ice bullets were shown to be ineffective. [[AC:[[http://mythbustersresults.com/episode1 Mythbusters]]]].
8th Mar '17 12:47:48 PM binksie
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* Brown describes a nefarious Vatican conspiracy to hide the truth of the Dead Sea Scrolls from the world. This would be quite a feat, since the Dead Sea Scrolls have never been under the control of the Vatican.
8th Mar '17 10:21:24 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it retains its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengers fall off and break two legs and an arm so they keep driving at racing speed regardless of traffic and Seville streets being described as twisted little alleys elsewhere in the book]]. The setting is [[TheyJustDidntCare just one logic bomb like that after another]].

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** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it retains its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengers fall off and break two legs and an arm so they keep driving at racing speed regardless of traffic and Seville streets being described as twisted little alleys elsewhere in the book]]. The setting is [[TheyJustDidntCare just one logic bomb like that after another]].another.
8th Mar '17 9:55:12 AM Naram-Sin
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** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it retains its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengrs fall off and break two legs and an arm for example]]. The book's setting is one logic bomb like that after another.

to:

** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it retains its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengrs passengers fall off and break two legs and an arm for example]]. so they keep driving at racing speed regardless of traffic and Seville streets being described as twisted little alleys elsewhere in the book]]. The book's setting is [[TheyJustDidntCare just one logic bomb like that after another.another]].
8th Mar '17 9:50:44 AM Naram-Sin
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** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, Brown also gets his Art History wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps.

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** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, Brown also gets his Art History wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps. Digging deeper in the wound, Brown repeats his "I studied Art History in Seville" story in the Foreword of the Spanish version and claims that Seville is one of his favorite cities in the world before proceeding to rip it to shreds in the actual novel.
8th Mar '17 9:48:29 AM Naram-Sin
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** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, but Brown also gets his Art History wrong in the book (saying that the 15th century cathedral is from the 11th century and that the 10th century Alcazar is from the 15th, that the cathedral has only one door when it has seven, and making a plot point out of the dangerous steps of the Giralda - a building notorious in real life for ''not'' having any steps, only ramps).

to:

** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, but Brown also gets his Art History wrong every single time in the book (saying that the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and that to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th, that 15th; and the cathedral has only one door when it has seven, and making a plot point out of the Giralda's dangerous steps of constitute a critical plot point despite the Giralda - a real building being notorious in real life for ''not'' not having any steps, only ramps).ramps.
7th Mar '17 6:40:30 PM Naram-Sin
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** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it still retains a five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic Yet money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place that are never put to use, and the same drivers that open the gates because they care about their passengers getting too hot don't care if they fall off and break a leg]]. The book's setting is full of logic bombs like that.

to:

** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it still retains a its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic Yet So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use, use to save money, and the same drivers that open the gates because they who don't care about to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if they the passengrs fall off and break a leg]]. two legs and an arm for example]]. The book's setting is full of one logic bombs bomb like that.that after another.
** David Becker speaks Spanish so well that he can fool a native Spaniard into thinking that Becker is a Burgos native just from hearing his voice over the phone. People in Burgos speak the standard Castilian dialect spoken by most Spaniards and used by default in Spanish media. It is simply impossible to recognize someone as being from Burgos from his accent alone.
7th Mar '17 6:30:10 PM Naram-Sin
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** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, but Brown also gets his Art History wrong in the book (saying that the 15th century cathedral is from the 11th century, that it has only one door when it has seven, and making a plot point out of the dangerous steps of the Giralda - a building notorious for ''not'' having any steps, only ramps).

to:

** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, but Brown also gets his Art History wrong in the book (saying that the 15th century cathedral is from the 11th century, century and that it the 10th century Alcazar is from the 15th, that the cathedral has only one door when it has seven, and making a plot point out of the dangerous steps of the Giralda - a building notorious in real life for ''not'' having any steps, only ramps).ramps).
** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it still retains a five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic Yet money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place that are never put to use, and the same drivers that open the gates because they care about their passengers getting too hot don't care if they fall off and break a leg]]. The book's setting is full of logic bombs like that.
6th Mar '17 5:50:50 AM beergood
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* Brown insists that the Priory of Sion, the secret society whose Grand Masters supposedly include Leonardo, Isaac Newton and Victor Hugo, is "...a European society founded in 1099, a real organization". In actual fact, it was founded by a French con man in 1956. ''[[AC: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priory_of_Sion Wikipedia]]]]''
19th Feb '17 4:54:07 PM BenOfHouston
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** That being said, Leonardo was accused of sodomy as a young man in 1476. However, he was acquitted. His writings in later life indicate that if anything, he was asexual and was simply uninterested in either sex.
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