History DanBrowned / DanBrown

9th Oct '17 8:03:17 PM PetroleumJerry
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* The book states that the etymology of "sincere" is a combination of two Latin works "sine" and "cera", meaning "without wax". A popular, but entirely wrong, urban legend.[[note]]Remember that English is the only European language untainted by Latin![[/note]] [[AC:[[http://books.google.com/books?id=eXZRfqgU3QoC&pg=PA145&dq=sincerus+origin&lr=&sig=O_i9vL1avM4gaJicsFlnH8_a5yc#v=onepage&q=sincerus%20origin&f=false Storied Words by Jeff Jeske]]]]

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* The book states that the etymology of "sincere" is a combination of two Latin works "sine" and "cera", meaning "without wax". A popular, but entirely wrong, urban legend.[[note]]Remember that English is [[note]]Cf. English's status as the only European language untainted by Latin![[/note]] "Lingua Pura" from ''The Da Vinci Code''![[/note]] [[AC:[[http://books.google.com/books?id=eXZRfqgU3QoC&pg=PA145&dq=sincerus+origin&lr=&sig=O_i9vL1avM4gaJicsFlnH8_a5yc#v=onepage&q=sincerus%20origin&f=false Storied Words by Jeff Jeske]]]]
9th Oct '17 8:01:55 PM PetroleumJerry
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* The book states that the etymology of "sincere" is a combination of two Latin works "sine" and "cera", meaning "without wax". A popular, but entirely wrong, urban legend. [[AC:[[http://books.google.com/books?id=eXZRfqgU3QoC&pg=PA145&dq=sincerus+origin&lr=&sig=O_i9vL1avM4gaJicsFlnH8_a5yc#v=onepage&q=sincerus%20origin&f=false Storied Words by Jeff Jeske]]]]

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* The book states that the etymology of "sincere" is a combination of two Latin works "sine" and "cera", meaning "without wax". A popular, but entirely wrong, urban legend. [[note]]Remember that English is the only European language untainted by Latin![[/note]] [[AC:[[http://books.google.com/books?id=eXZRfqgU3QoC&pg=PA145&dq=sincerus+origin&lr=&sig=O_i9vL1avM4gaJicsFlnH8_a5yc#v=onepage&q=sincerus%20origin&f=false Storied Words by Jeff Jeske]]]]
4th Oct '17 5:30:47 AM Allexan
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** That point can be handwaved: source code, theorethical proofs and similar stuff in plain text is bundled with binary implementation of decoder, obfuscated and jury-rigged to only accept a specific file. Though no effort from Brown himself to say even that.
21st Jul '17 8:13:19 AM TropicalAudio
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* Claiming "unplanned births" are a problem in the western world in context of overpopulation, even though the average fertility rate in Europe and America is around 1.9 babies per woman: below replenishment rates. In fact, the global average fertility rate has come down from about 5 babies per woman in 1965, to about 2.4 babies per woman in 2015 and it's still dropping. Brown built the entire main plot for Inferno around the "mathematical certainty" of exponential population growth, but the world population is actually mathematically projected to stabilize between 10 and 12 billion people.''[[AC:[[https://www.gapminder.org/news/children-per-women-since-1800-in-gapminder-world/ Gapminder visualization]]]]''

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* Claiming "unplanned births" are a problem in the western world in context of overpopulation, even though the average fertility rate in Europe and America is around 1.9 babies per woman: below replenishment rates. In fact, the global average fertility rate has come down from about 5 babies per woman in 1965, to about 2.4 babies per woman in 2015 and it's still dropping. Brown built the entire main plot for Inferno around the "mathematical certainty" of exponential population growth, but the world population is actually mathematically projected to stabilize between 10 and 12 billion people. ''[[AC:[[https://www.gapminder.org/news/children-per-women-since-1800-in-gapminder-world/ Gapminder visualization]]]]''
21st Jul '17 6:17:51 AM TropicalAudio
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Added DiffLines:

* Claiming "unplanned births" are a problem in the western world in context of overpopulation, even though the average fertility rate in Europe and America is around 1.9 babies per woman: below replenishment rates. In fact, the global average fertility rate has come down from about 5 babies per woman in 1965, to about 2.4 babies per woman in 2015 and it's still dropping. Brown built the entire main plot for Inferno around the "mathematical certainty" of exponential population growth, but the world population is actually mathematically projected to stabilize between 10 and 12 billion people.''[[AC:[[https://www.gapminder.org/news/children-per-women-since-1800-in-gapminder-world/ Gapminder visualization]]]]''
8th Jun '17 5:34:42 AM KarkoRagin
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* In the book, the aforementioned ciphertext turns out to be a virus. It was quickly decrypted and subsequently infected all sorts of critical computers. This makes ''no sense at all''. The only way a virus can attack a machine is if the machine executes the file (this may happen with a standalone virus file, or with a virus that's embedded into a larger executable file somehow), but there is ''absolutely no reason'' why the supercomputer should attempt to execute every file which it has decrypted! Most of the time you'd only want to ''read'' the file. If you ''did'' want to execute it, there would surely be another step where somebody has to click "OK", and even then there'd be sandboxing and whatever other protections in place to prevent attacks—if the NSA had a policy of running every file it decrypts (without protection!), anyone in the world could just encrypt a common virus, email it to the NSA, and the NSA would be screwed.[[note]]Technically, there are a few methods that would allow a weak system to be infected after simply reading the contents of a file. This requires that the contents themselves somehow "trick" the program reading them to execute code despite not being intended to (e.g SQL injection, buffer overflow, etc.). This method of attack, however, is not nearly as simple as using just a single "magical" handful of code. It's unlikely that it could infect a single system, let alone several, especially if we are talking about the NSA.[[/note]]

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* In the book, the aforementioned ciphertext turns out to be a virus. It was quickly decrypted and subsequently infected all sorts of critical computers. This makes ''no sense at all''. The only way a virus can attack a machine is if the machine executes the file (this may happen with a standalone virus file, or with a virus that's embedded into a larger executable file somehow), but there is ''absolutely no reason'' why the supercomputer should attempt to execute every file which it has decrypted! Most of the time you'd only want to ''read'' the file. If you ''did'' want to execute it, there would surely be another step where somebody has to click "OK", and even then there'd be sandboxing and whatever other protections in place to prevent attacks—if the NSA had a policy of running every file it decrypts (without protection!), anyone in the world could just encrypt a common virus, email it to the NSA, and the NSA would be screwed.[[note]]Technically, there are a few methods that would allow a weak system to be infected after simply reading the contents of a file. This requires that the contents themselves somehow "trick" the program reading them to execute code despite not being intended to (e.g SQL injection, buffer overflow, etc.). This method of attack, however, is not nearly as simple as using just a single "magical" handful of code. It's unlikely that it could infect a single system, let alone several, especially if we are talking about the NSA. It's a well-known exploit, so any decent computer system has defenses against it... unless somehow the cyphertext is also a "supervirus" that can infect anything.[[/note]]
8th Jun '17 5:31:42 AM KarkoRagin
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* In the book, the aforementioned ciphertext turns out to be a virus. It was quickly decrypted and subsequently infected all sorts of critical computers. This makes ''no sense at all''. The only way a virus can attack a machine is if the machine executes the file (this may happen with a standalone virus file, or with a virus that's embedded into a larger executable file somehow), but there is ''absolutely no reason'' why the supercomputer should attempt to execute every file which it has decrypted! Most of the time you'd only want to ''read'' the file. If you ''did'' want to execute it, there would surely be another step where somebody has to click "OK", and even then there'd be sandboxing and whatever other protections in place to prevent attacks—if the NSA had a policy of running every file it decrypts (without protection!), anyone in the world could just encrypt a common virus, email it to the NSA, and the NSA would be screwed.

to:

* In the book, the aforementioned ciphertext turns out to be a virus. It was quickly decrypted and subsequently infected all sorts of critical computers. This makes ''no sense at all''. The only way a virus can attack a machine is if the machine executes the file (this may happen with a standalone virus file, or with a virus that's embedded into a larger executable file somehow), but there is ''absolutely no reason'' why the supercomputer should attempt to execute every file which it has decrypted! Most of the time you'd only want to ''read'' the file. If you ''did'' want to execute it, there would surely be another step where somebody has to click "OK", and even then there'd be sandboxing and whatever other protections in place to prevent attacks—if the NSA had a policy of running every file it decrypts (without protection!), anyone in the world could just encrypt a common virus, email it to the NSA, and the NSA would be screwed.[[note]]Technically, there are a few methods that would allow a weak system to be infected after simply reading the contents of a file. This requires that the contents themselves somehow "trick" the program reading them to execute code despite not being intended to (e.g SQL injection, buffer overflow, etc.). This method of attack, however, is not nearly as simple as using just a single "magical" handful of code. It's unlikely that it could infect a single system, let alone several, especially if we are talking about the NSA.[[/note]]
8th Jun '17 5:18:15 AM KarkoRagin
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* A bomb made by anti-matter to blow up the Vatican? There hasn't been enough anti-matter produced in the world to boil a cup of coffee. Also, to make a bomb out of anti-matter they would have to have several huge and ''very, very rich'' backers. It's been estimated that to produce even ''one gram'' of anti-matter would cost $25 ''billion'', and they'd need more than one gram. Anti-matter is extremely expensive to make, and then there's the problem of transporting the stuff to the Vatican without it blowing up along the way. It'd be much easier and cheaper (even for CERN) to just use regular bombs.

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* A bomb made by anti-matter to blow up the Vatican? There hasn't been enough anti-matter produced in the world to boil a cup of coffee. Also, to make a bomb out of anti-matter they would have to have several huge and ''very, very rich'' backers. It's been estimated that to produce even ''one gram'' of anti-matter would cost $25 ''billion'', and they'd need more than one gram. ''billion''. Anti-matter is extremely far too expensive to make, and then there's the problem of transporting the stuff to the Vatican without it blowing up along the way. It'd be much easier and cheaper (even for CERN) to just use regular bombs.
6th Jun '17 11:30:57 PM Chariset
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* The opening quote, "The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis", is not found anywhere in ''Inferno''. In fact, it is several centuries more recent than Dante, being said by John F. Kennedy on West Germany Peace Corps (change from "darkest" to "hottest"), and later used by Martin Luther King, Jr. with reference to the Vietnam War. Dante did despise those who tried to remain neutral, but he stated in his ''Commedia'' that the damned would consider themselves superior to the uncommitted since the damned at least chose their own destinies by their actions. However, Dante places the would-be neutral neither in Hell itself nor out of it, but on the shores of the river Acheron, where they're condemned to chase an endlessly elusive banner while being stung by wasps and hornets. In Dante, Hell's worst place, its ninth circle, is not for the neutral but for traitors, and is not the darkest but the ''lowest'' and coldest. The darkest place in Dante's hell is the second circle, which is for the lustful.''[[AC: [[http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Fast-Facts/Dante.aspx JFK Library]]]]''

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* The opening quote, "The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis", is not found anywhere in ''Inferno''. In fact, it is several centuries more recent than Dante, being said by John F. Kennedy on West Germany Peace Corps (change from "darkest" to "hottest"), and later used by Martin Luther King, Jr. with reference to the Vietnam War. Dante did despise those who tried to remain neutral, but he stated in his ''Commedia'' neutral and claims that the damned would consider themselves superior to the uncommitted undecided since the damned they at least chose their own destinies by their actions. However, Dante places ''something''. To avoid giving the damned even that pleasure, the would-be neutral neither are not punished in Hell itself nor out of it, proper but on the shores of the river Acheron, where they're condemned to chase an endlessly elusive banner while being stung by wasps and hornets. In Dante, Hell's worst place, its ninth circle, is not for the neutral but for traitors, and is not the darkest but the ''lowest'' and coldest. The darkest place in Dante's hell is the second circle, which is for the lustful.''[[AC: [[http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Fast-Facts/Dante.aspx JFK Library]]]]''
16th May '17 12:14:27 AM Madrugada
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** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles.
*** They also (at least as far as the Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardos."
*** Interestingly enough, that was not the case with the Polish title of the ''movie'', which is just as erroneous as the original.

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** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles.
*** They also (at least as far as the
titles. The Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardos."
*** Interestingly enough, that was not the case with the Polish title of the ''movie'', which is just as erroneous as the original.
"



* No, Leonardo da Vinci was not "flamboyantly homosexual". No law-abiding citizen was 'flamboyantly' anything besides heterosexual due to the laws of the time. ''[[AC:The Da Vinci Hoax]]''
** Also, the standard of acceptable casualty between genders has fluctuated greatly over the centuries, and the terms "homosexual" and "heterosexual" themselves only date to the last century or so. The terms, and almost certainly their standards, would be alien to Leonardo.
** That being said, Leonardo was accused of sodomy as a young man in 1476. However, he was acquitted. His writings in later life indicate that if anything, he was asexual and was simply uninterested in either sex.

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* No, Leonardo da Vinci was not "flamboyantly homosexual". No law-abiding citizen was 'flamboyantly' anything besides heterosexual due to the laws of the time. ''[[AC:The Da Vinci Hoax]]''
**
Also, the standard of acceptable casualty between genders has fluctuated greatly over the centuries, and the terms "homosexual" and "heterosexual" themselves only date to the last century or so. The terms, and almost certainly their standards, would be alien to Leonardo.
** That being said,
Leonardo. Leonardo was ''was'' accused of sodomy as a young man in 1476. However, he was acquitted.''acquitted''. His writings in later life indicate that if anything, he was asexual and was simply uninterested in either sex. ''[[AC:The Da Vinci Hoax]]''



** The Templars were excellent bankers and their ranks contained many acclaimed scholars. But as for passing down ancient wisdoms go, they weren't superior to any other political or religious power group of their period.



* If there are ''any'' descendants of Jesus, it'd be a sizeable group, not a select few. ''[[AC: [[http://www.slate.com/id/2138060/ Slate]]]]'' To be fair, a multitude of descendants isn't important when tracing a royal lineage.
* In the description of [[http://www.myartprints.co.uk/kunst/leonardo_da_vinci/7957001.jpg Madonna Grotto]] John the Baptist is on the right, blessing Jesus on the left and being threatened by Virgin Mary. Aside from the... weird interpretation of this protective gesture, [[http://yakub.ucoz.ru/grafica/davinchi/Thumbnails/det8.jpg here]]'s another version of Madonna Grotto. A staff with a cross on it is John the Baptist's symbol. Which kid has it?

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* If there are ''any'' descendants of Jesus, it'd be a sizeable group, not a select few. ''[[AC: [[http://www.slate.com/id/2138060/ Slate]]]]'' To be fair, a multitude of descendants isn't important when tracing a royal lineage.
Slate]]]]''
* In the description of [[http://www.myartprints.co.uk/kunst/leonardo_da_vinci/7957001.jpg Madonna Grotto]] Brown says that John the Baptist is on the right, blessing Jesus on the left and being threatened by Virgin Mary. Aside from the... weird interpretation of this protective gesture, [[http://yakub.ucoz.ru/grafica/davinchi/Thumbnails/det8.jpg here]]'s another version of Madonna Grotto. A staff with a cross on it is John the Baptist's symbol. Which kid has it?



* What about that ''monk'' from Opus Dei? Even though Opus Dei was specifically founded for people who live "in the world"? (In other words, people who ''aren't'' members of religious orders.)

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* What about that ''monk'' from Opus Dei? Even though Opus Dei was specifically founded for people who live "in the world"? (In other words, people who ''aren't'' members of religious orders.)



* Also Constantine the Great and the First Council of Nicea in AD 367 had nothing to do with making Christianity the official religion in the Roman Empire. Constantine ''only'' made it a legal religion, and the Council decided on questions like the divinity of Christ. It was Emperor Theodosius 65 years later who declared Christianity to be the state religion.[[note]] Theodosius was beaten to the punch by King Trdat of Armenia and King Ezana of Ethiopia, who proclaimed Christianity the official religion of their realms in 314 and 333 respectively[[/note]]
** Brown is also responsible for a false meme which has spread throughout popular culture: that the Council of Nicaea "set" the Biblical canon, the books which are considered official scripture (according to Brown, thereby suppressing those Gospels that contained the "truth" about Jesus' descendants yadda yadda yadda). In fact, Nicaea had ''absolutely nothing'' to say about the canon; on the one hand the four Gospels had been agreed upon as the only legitimate ones as early as 175[[note]] Well before most of the various Gnostic and other apocryphal Gospels were even written[[/note]] and the other 23 books were universally recognized by the mid-3rd century.[[note]] In the Latin West; it was another two centuries before the Eastern Church recognized Revelation[[/note]] on the other hand no Council officially decreed the canon as set until that of Trent in 1546 -- ''after Leonardo's death.''

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* Also Constantine the Great and the First Council of Nicea in AD 367 had nothing to do with making Christianity the official religion in the Roman Empire. Constantine ''only'' made simply legalized it as a legal religion, and the Council decided on questions like the divinity of Christ. It was Emperor Theodosius Theodosius, 65 years later later, in [=AD=] 432 who declared Christianity to be the state religion.[[note]] Theodosius was beaten to the punch by King Trdat of Armenia and King Ezana of Ethiopia, who proclaimed Christianity the official religion of their realms in 314 and 333 respectively[[/note]]
** * Brown is also responsible for a false meme which has spread throughout popular culture: that the Council of Nicaea "set" the Biblical canon, the books which are considered official scripture (according to Brown, thereby suppressing those Gospels that contained the "truth" about Jesus' descendants yadda yadda yadda). In fact, Nicaea had ''absolutely nothing'' to say about the canon; on the one hand the four Gospels had been agreed upon as the only legitimate ones as early as 175[[note]] Well before most of the various Gnostic and other apocryphal Gospels were even written[[/note]] and the other 23 books were universally recognized by the mid-3rd century.[[note]] In the Latin West; it was another two centuries before the Eastern Church recognized Revelation[[/note]] on the other hand no Council officially decreed the canon as set until that of Trent in 1546 -- ''after Leonardo's death.''



* The idea that papyrus could easily be destroyed by vinegar. Papyrus is sturdy enough to hold itself together for 2-3 millennia, and vellum can survive for hours sunken in ''concentrated hydrochloric acid''. A few drops of vinegar would just make some stains.

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* The idea that papyrus or vellum could easily be destroyed by vinegar. Papyrus is sturdy enough to hold itself together for 2-3 millennia, and vellum can survive for hours sunken in ''concentrated hydrochloric acid''. A few drops of vinegar would just make some stains.



* While its true that many of the experiments done by Katherine Solomon have been done in real life, they're hardly the conclusive truth as presented in the book. Masaru Emoto did do experiments on how thoughts could change the structure of water crystals, but they've been highly criticized—Emoto did not have controls on his experiment and has not given out his technique for others to attempt to repeat, and he's acknowledged that he just chose the pictures he liked best. The triple blind study conducted to try to replicate the effects failed to get significant results. ''[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masaru_Emoto#Criticism Wikipedia]]]]''

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* While its true that many of the experiments done by Katherine Solomon have been done in real life, they're hardly the conclusive truth as presented in the book. Masaru Emoto did do experiments on how thoughts could change the structure of water crystals, but they've been highly criticized—Emoto criticized — Emoto did not have controls on his experiment and has not given out his technique for others to attempt to repeat, and he's acknowledged that he just chose the pictures he liked best. The triple blind study conducted to try to replicate the effects failed to get significant results. ''[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masaru_Emoto#Criticism Wikipedia]]]]''



* Misquoting Robert Oppenheimer as saying "I have become Vishnu, destroyer of worlds". Actual quote: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."''[[AC: [[http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Robert_Oppenheimer Wikiquote on this]]]]''
** Vishnu is the Preserver; if he were to invoke a Hindu god, Śiva the Destroyer would be more appropriate.
* The opening quote, "The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis", is not found anywhere in ''Inferno''. In fact, it is more recent than Dante, being by John F. Kennedy on West Germany Peace Corps (change from "darkest" to "hottest"), and later used by Martin Luther King, Jr. with reference to the Vietnam War. Dante did despise those who tried to remain neutral, but he stated in his ''Commedia'' that the damned would consider themselves superior to the uncommitted since the damned at least chose their own destinies by their actions. However, Dante places the would-be neutral neither in Hell itself nor out of it, but on the shores of the river Acheron, where they're condemned to chase an endlessly elusive banner while being stung by wasps and hornets. In Dante, Hell's worst place, its ninth circle, is not for the neutral but for traitors, and is not the darkest but the ''lowest'' and coldest. The darkest place in Dante's hell is the second circle, which is for the lustful.''[[AC: [[http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Fast-Facts/Dante.aspx JFK Library]]]]''

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* Misquoting Robert Oppenheimer as saying "I have become Vishnu, destroyer of worlds". Actual quote: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."''[[AC: " Vishnu is the Preserver; if he were to invoke a Hindu god, Śiva the Destroyer would be more appropriate.''[[AC: [[http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Robert_Oppenheimer Wikiquote on this]]]]''
** Vishnu is the Preserver; if he were to invoke a Hindu god, Śiva the Destroyer would be more appropriate.
this]]]]''
* The opening quote, "The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis", is not found anywhere in ''Inferno''. In fact, it is several centuries more recent than Dante, being said by John F. Kennedy on West Germany Peace Corps (change from "darkest" to "hottest"), and later used by Martin Luther King, Jr. with reference to the Vietnam War. Dante did despise those who tried to remain neutral, but he stated in his ''Commedia'' that the damned would consider themselves superior to the uncommitted since the damned at least chose their own destinies by their actions. However, Dante places the would-be neutral neither in Hell itself nor out of it, but on the shores of the river Acheron, where they're condemned to chase an endlessly elusive banner while being stung by wasps and hornets. In Dante, Hell's worst place, its ninth circle, is not for the neutral but for traitors, and is not the darkest but the ''lowest'' and coldest. The darkest place in Dante's hell is the second circle, which is for the lustful.''[[AC: [[http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Fast-Facts/Dante.aspx JFK Library]]]]''
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