History CurbStompBattle / RealLife

14th Jun '16 5:26:29 PM KeithM
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Added DiffLines:

*** The lesson of the battle was a trained group of soldiers acting in cooperation with each other (the English knights and archers who acted as a combined-arms unit) will almost always be able to deal with a ZergRush of a large group of individuals.
28th May '16 10:49:32 AM erforce
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** [[AvertedTrope Averted]] with the seventh-generation consoles. While Nintendo Wii came out on top with 100 million consoles sold, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 were not too far behind with around 80 million consoles both.

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** [[AvertedTrope Averted]] with the seventh-generation consoles. While Nintendo Wii came out on top with 100 million consoles sold, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 were not too far behind with around 80 million consoles both.
28th May '16 7:02:19 AM ironballs16
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---->'''Togo''': It may be proper to compare me to Nelson, but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]].

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---->'''Togo''': ---->'''Tōgō''': It may be proper to compare me to Nelson, [[UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson Nelson]], but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]].
28th May '16 6:57:21 AM ironballs16
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** On the sea however, the story couldn't be more opposite. Korea had an outnumbered but very competent navy trained by centuries of defending against Japanese pirates. Korea had been one of the first adopters of naval artillery in the world, and by the peak of the war, their ships were bristling with cannons, to the tune of up to 50 guns per ship. And these guns were all superior to anything the Japanese had. Japanese ships on the other hand, were designed for speed and boarding tactics, and were too flimsy to wield more than 2 or 3. Needlessly to say, it's difficult to close in and try to mêlée at a ship's crew that's been pounding you silly for the last kilometer or so. It also helps that the Koreans had a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_ship turtle ships]], which in addition to looking cool, happened to perfectly counter the Japanese grapple-and-boarding tactics, almost exactly like how those spiky turtles counter [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] jumping on their back. In addition, Korean navy was led by Admiral [[http://www.badassoftheweek.com/admiralyi.html Yi Soon-Shin]], a hypercompetent tactician for whom the term "[[FourStarBadass badass]]" doesn't even begin to describe him[[note]]As Admiral Togo, known as "The [[UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson Nelson]] of the East", said 300 years later - "It may be proper to compare me to Nelson, but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]]."[[/note]] Taking advantage of the Korean Navy's technological superiority and greater knowledge of the local currents and terrain, he managed to win battle after battle without hardly losing any of his own forces, even though he was numerically outnumbered every time. However, a Japanese double agent managed to get him demoted to a common footsoldier, taking advantage of Korea's infighting ruling class. Yi's successor promptly managed to get lured into a trap, and lost all but 13 of the 169-strong Korean Navy. Yi was hurriedly reinstated. In an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome of naval warfare, in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Myeongnyang Battle of Myeongnyang]] Yi went up against 133 Japanese warships and over 200 armed transports[[note]]The Japanese fleet was so large that the observers lost count[[/note]], with exactly 13 ships. By the end of the battle, 31 Japanese ships were sunk and over 90 were crippled. The Korean Navy lost ''2 soldiers''. Not 2 ships, ''2 SOLDIERS''[[note]]to direct enemy action, a handful more died of accidents in the chaos[[/note]]. The impossibility of supply by sea and the entrance from Ming China as an ally of Korea (having gained confidence that they can spare a fleet and some battalions for battle instead of their own defense) meant that the Japanese were ultimately forced off the peninsula. This is why Tōgō Heihachirō, the Japanese admiral who centuries later curbstomped the Russians in the Russo-Japanese War (see below), rejected any comparisons between himself and Yi Soon-Shin and insisted that Yi was on a whole other level. (He was happy to be compared to Horatio Nelson, though.)

to:

** On the sea however, the story couldn't be more opposite. Korea had an outnumbered but very competent navy trained by centuries of defending against Japanese pirates. Korea had been one of the first adopters of naval artillery in the world, and by the peak of the war, their ships were bristling with cannons, to the tune of up to 50 guns per ship. And these guns were all superior to anything the Japanese had. Japanese ships on the other hand, were designed for speed and boarding tactics, and were too flimsy to wield more than 2 or 3. Needlessly to say, it's difficult to close in and try to mêlée at a ship's crew that's been pounding you silly for the last kilometer or so. It also helps that the Koreans had a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_ship turtle ships]], which in addition to looking cool, happened to perfectly counter the Japanese grapple-and-boarding tactics, almost exactly like how those spiky turtles counter [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] jumping on their back. In addition, Korean navy was led by Admiral [[http://www.badassoftheweek.com/admiralyi.html Yi Soon-Shin]], a hypercompetent tactician for whom the term "[[FourStarBadass badass]]" doesn't even begin to describe him[[note]]As Admiral Togo, known as "The [[UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson Nelson]] of the East", said 300 years later - "It may be proper to compare me to Nelson, but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]]."[[/note]] him. Taking advantage of the Korean Navy's technological superiority and greater knowledge of the local currents and terrain, he managed to win battle after battle without hardly losing any of his own forces, forces (and ''zero'' ships), even though he was numerically outnumbered every time. time.
***
However, a Japanese double agent managed to get him demoted to a common footsoldier, taking advantage of Korea's infighting ruling class. Yi's successor promptly managed to get lured into a trap, and lost all but 13 of the 169-strong Korean Navy. Yi was hurriedly reinstated. In an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome of naval warfare, in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Myeongnyang Battle of Myeongnyang]] Yi went up against 133 Japanese warships and over 200 armed transports[[note]]The Japanese fleet was so large that the observers lost count[[/note]], with exactly 13 ships. By the end of the battle, 31 Japanese ships were sunk and over 90 were crippled. The Korean Navy lost ''2 soldiers''. Not 2 ships, ''2 SOLDIERS''[[note]]to direct enemy action, a handful more died of accidents in the chaos[[/note]]. The impossibility of supply by sea and the entrance from Ming China as an ally of Korea (having gained confidence that they can spare a fleet and some battalions for battle instead of their own defense) meant that the Japanese were ultimately forced off the peninsula. This is why Tōgō Heihachirō, the Japanese admiral who centuries later curbstomped the Russians in the Russo-Japanese War (see below), rejected any comparisons between himself and Yi Soon-Shin and insisted that Yi was on a whole other level. (He was happy Soon-Shin.
---->'''Togo''': It may be proper
to be compared compare me to Horatio Nelson, though.)but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]].
28th May '16 6:54:44 AM ironballs16
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** On the sea however, the story couldn't be more opposite. Korea had an outnumbered but very competent navy trained by centuries of defending against Japanese pirates. Korea had been one of the first adopters of naval artillery in the world, and by the peak of the war, their ships were bristling with cannons, to the tune of up to 50 guns per ship. And these guns were all superior to anything the Japanese had. Japanese ships on the other hand, were designed for speed and boarding tactics, and were too flimsy to wield more than 2 or 3. Needlessly to say, it's difficult to close in and try to mêlée at a ship's crew that's been pounding you silly for the last kilometer or so. It also helps that the Koreans had a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_ship turtle ships]], which in addition to looking cool, happened to perfectly counter the Japanese grapple-and-boarding tactics, almost exactly like how those spiky turtles counter [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] jumping on their back. In addition, Korean navy was led by Admiral [[http://www.badassoftheweek.com/admiralyi.html Yi Soon-Shin]], a hypercompetent tactician for whom the term "[[FourStarBadass badass]]" doesn't even begin to describe him. Taking advantage of the Korean Navy's technological superiority and greater knowledge of the local currents and terrain, he managed to win battle after battle without hardly losing any of his own forces, even though he was numerically outnumbered every time. However, a Japanese double agent managed to get him demoted to a common footsoldier, taking advantage of Korea's infighting ruling class. Yi's successor promptly managed to get lured into a trap, and lost all but 13 of the 169-strong Korean Navy. Yi was hurriedly reinstated. In an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome of naval warfare, in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Myeongnyang Battle of Myeongnyang]] Yi went up against 133 Japanese warships and over 200 armed transports[[note]]The Japanese fleet was so large that the observers lost count[[/note]], with exactly 13 ships. By the end of the battle, 31 Japanese ships were sunk and over 90 were crippled. The Korean Navy lost ''2 soldiers''. Not 2 ships, ''2 SOLDIERS''[[note]]to direct enemy action, a handful more died of accidents in the chaos[[/note]]. The impossibility of supply by sea and the entrance from Ming China as an ally of Korea (having gained confidence that they can spare a fleet and some battalions for battle instead of their own defense) meant that the Japanese were ultimately forced off the peninsula. This is why Tōgō Heihachirō, the Japanese admiral who centuries later curbstomped the Russians in the Russo-Japanese War (see below), rejected any comparisons between himself and Yi Soon-Shin and insisted that Yi was on a whole other level. (He was happy to be compared to Horatio Nelson, though.)

to:

** On the sea however, the story couldn't be more opposite. Korea had an outnumbered but very competent navy trained by centuries of defending against Japanese pirates. Korea had been one of the first adopters of naval artillery in the world, and by the peak of the war, their ships were bristling with cannons, to the tune of up to 50 guns per ship. And these guns were all superior to anything the Japanese had. Japanese ships on the other hand, were designed for speed and boarding tactics, and were too flimsy to wield more than 2 or 3. Needlessly to say, it's difficult to close in and try to mêlée at a ship's crew that's been pounding you silly for the last kilometer or so. It also helps that the Koreans had a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_ship turtle ships]], which in addition to looking cool, happened to perfectly counter the Japanese grapple-and-boarding tactics, almost exactly like how those spiky turtles counter [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] jumping on their back. In addition, Korean navy was led by Admiral [[http://www.badassoftheweek.com/admiralyi.html Yi Soon-Shin]], a hypercompetent tactician for whom the term "[[FourStarBadass badass]]" doesn't even begin to describe him. him[[note]]As Admiral Togo, known as "The [[UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson Nelson]] of the East", said 300 years later - "It may be proper to compare me to Nelson, but not with [[WorthyOpponent Korea's Yi Sun-Sin]], [[MemeticBadass for he has no equal]]."[[/note]] Taking advantage of the Korean Navy's technological superiority and greater knowledge of the local currents and terrain, he managed to win battle after battle without hardly losing any of his own forces, even though he was numerically outnumbered every time. However, a Japanese double agent managed to get him demoted to a common footsoldier, taking advantage of Korea's infighting ruling class. Yi's successor promptly managed to get lured into a trap, and lost all but 13 of the 169-strong Korean Navy. Yi was hurriedly reinstated. In an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome of naval warfare, in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Myeongnyang Battle of Myeongnyang]] Yi went up against 133 Japanese warships and over 200 armed transports[[note]]The Japanese fleet was so large that the observers lost count[[/note]], with exactly 13 ships. By the end of the battle, 31 Japanese ships were sunk and over 90 were crippled. The Korean Navy lost ''2 soldiers''. Not 2 ships, ''2 SOLDIERS''[[note]]to direct enemy action, a handful more died of accidents in the chaos[[/note]]. The impossibility of supply by sea and the entrance from Ming China as an ally of Korea (having gained confidence that they can spare a fleet and some battalions for battle instead of their own defense) meant that the Japanese were ultimately forced off the peninsula. This is why Tōgō Heihachirō, the Japanese admiral who centuries later curbstomped the Russians in the Russo-Japanese War (see below), rejected any comparisons between himself and Yi Soon-Shin and insisted that Yi was on a whole other level. (He was happy to be compared to Horatio Nelson, though.)
28th May '16 6:51:18 AM ironballs16
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** On land, Japan was definitely the deliverer. Korea's Joseon dynasty was terribly unprepared for war, having become complacent by centuries of mostly peace. The country was run by an incompetent weak king and corrupt [[DividedWeFall infighting aristocrats]] who ignored numerous warning signs of Japan's impending invasion and refused to invest on defense. They had a grossly undersized standing army, and the scholar-class's dominance of Korean politics meant that military matters were largely belittled and ignored. Japan, on the other hand, was recently unified, ruled by seasoned samurai, and was itching for some more war after centuries of fighting each other. Oh, and the Japanese obtained arquebuses from Portuguese traders, while the Korean army barely knew how to weaponize gunpowder in something smaller than an unwieldly hand cannon. Needless to say, Japan managed to take over 3/4th of the Korean peninsula in matter of months - curb stomp battle after curb stomp battle.

to:

** On land, Japan was definitely the deliverer. Korea's Joseon dynasty was terribly unprepared for war, having become complacent by centuries of mostly peace. The country was run by an incompetent weak king and corrupt [[DividedWeFall infighting aristocrats]] who ignored numerous warning signs of Japan's impending invasion and refused to invest on defense. They had a grossly undersized standing army, and the scholar-class's dominance of Korean politics meant that military matters were largely belittled and ignored. Japan, on the other hand, was recently unified, ruled by seasoned samurai, and was itching for some more war [[UsefulNotes/SengokuPeriod after centuries of fighting each other.other]]. Oh, and the Japanese obtained arquebuses from Portuguese traders, while the Korean army barely knew how to weaponize gunpowder in something smaller than an unwieldly hand cannon. Needless to say, Japan managed to take over 3/4th of the Korean peninsula in matter of months - curb stomp battle after curb stomp battle.
28th May '16 6:45:56 AM ironballs16
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*** The Japanese were actually on the cutting edge of naval theory and were one of the first navies to seriously use their carriers as their primary naval weapon and played central roles in Japanese naval operations. The US rapidly adapted to the new style of naval warfare but was more or less forced to by the attack on Pearl Harbor, which sunk or damaged most of the battleships but spared the carriers. It was the lack of resources and industrial base in Japan, coupled with their tendency towards fancy-looking but inefficient tactics and sinking their scarce resources into impractical projects like the Yamato, that ultimately lost the naval war for them since the US could easily replace even whole carriers sunk, whereas each one was a grievous loss to the Japanese who couldn't rebuild them fast enough.

to:

*** The Japanese were actually on the cutting edge of naval theory and were one of the first navies to seriously use their carriers as their primary naval weapon and played central roles in Japanese naval operations. The US rapidly adapted to the new style of naval warfare but was more or less forced to by the attack on Pearl Harbor, which sunk or damaged most of the battleships but spared the carriers. It was the lack of resources and industrial base in Japan, coupled with their tendency towards [[AwesomeButImpractical fancy-looking but inefficient tactics tactics]] and sinking their scarce resources into impractical projects like the Yamato, that ultimately lost the naval war for them since the US could easily replace even whole carriers sunk, whereas each one was a grievous loss to the Japanese who couldn't rebuild them fast enough.
27th May '16 5:31:53 PM nombretomado
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** The UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has sold over ''ten times'' as many units as its competitor, the PSVita.

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** The UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has sold over ''ten times'' as many units as its competitor, the PSVita.UsefulNotes/PSVita.
16th May '16 9:14:19 PM DanielCase
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* The [[ArabIsraeliConflict Six Day War]] was a Curb Stomp ''War''. During the tense buildup to the war, the Syrians and Egyptians were spouting rhetoric like "We will drive them into the sea," and (at one particularly tense moment) "[[HomeByChristmas This time next week, we will be having lunch in Tel Aviv]]." The Israelis launched a dawn sneak attack on the Arab air forces while their pilots were all at breakfast, virtually obliterating them. Without air support, the Arabs stood no chance against the Israeli ground strike, and surrendered within [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin six days]].

to:

* The [[ArabIsraeliConflict Six Day War]] was a Curb Stomp ''War''. During the tense buildup to the war, the Syrians and Egyptians were spouting rhetoric like "We will drive them into the sea," and (at one particularly tense moment) "[[HomeByChristmas This time next week, week]], [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs we will be having lunch in Tel Aviv]]." The Israelis launched a dawn sneak attack on the Arab air forces while their pilots were all at breakfast, virtually obliterating them. Without air support, the Arabs stood no chance against the Israeli ground strike, and surrendered within [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin six days]].
28th Apr '16 10:11:56 AM hullflyer
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* The Pacific War, the U.S. vs Japan subset of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, rapidly devolved to this as the war progressed as the battles below show. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as it was primarily a naval and air war that favored the side with the greatest ability to outproduce the other; in this case, by far the largest industrialized economy in the world facing off against a resource-poor nation that had already been at war for 5 years.

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* The Pacific War, the U.S. vs Japan subset of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, rapidly devolved to this as the war progressed as the battles below show. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as it was primarily a naval and air war that favored the side with the greatest ability to outproduce the other; in this case, by far the largest industrialized economy in the world facing off against a resource-poor nation that had already been at war for 5 years.[[note]]Japan was in fact aware of this, but believed that an overwhelming strike (which would manifest as the Battle of Pearl Harbor) would destroy the US' spirit and keep them out of the Pacific.[[/note]]
** The first of these battles was the only one that the Japanese inflicted on the Americans, Pearl Harbor. The US had four of their eight battleships sunk, with the remaining four badly damaged (though all but one, ''Arizona'', were later raised, and six were returned to service). Three cruisers, three destroyers, and a minelayer were also sunk or damaged. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 wounded. Japanese losses were 29 fighters, five midget subs, and 64 men killed. The one good thing about the attack was that the Japanese, following military doctrine of the time, had concentrated on battleships, and all but ignored the carriers, which would prove to be a major mistake (see the next two entries).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=CurbStompBattle.RealLife