History CreatorBreakdown / Literature

24th May '16 6:20:04 PM Kid
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* According to TheOtherWiki, Robert Munsch wrote his book ''Love You Forever'', after he and his wife had given birth to two stillborn babies.

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* According to TheOtherWiki, Robert Munsch wrote his book ''Love You Forever'', Forever'' after he and his wife had given birth to two stillborn babies.
24th May '16 6:02:40 PM Kid
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** Twain lost faith in organized religion, and in people's expectations of it, but not in God Himself- his last published work, ''Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven'', while mocking these aspects, showed a generally truly benevolent version of Heaven.

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** Twain lost faith in organized religion, and in people's expectations of it, but not in God Himself- his Himself--his last published work, ''Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven'', while mocking these aspects, showed a generally truly benevolent version of Heaven.
18th Mar '16 8:12:44 AM thatsnumberwang
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* Throughout most of the latter part of his life, Ian Fleming was a heavy smoker and an alcoholic; at his height he was managing seventy cigarettes and at least a bottle of spirits a day. By 1964 at the age of 56 these things tragically cut short his life. What is interesting to note is that we know that he was suffering greatly by 1960, and his Bond books written after this time take on new meaning if they are read with this in mind as Bond grows darker and sicker with each installment.\\\
Bond shared his creator's love of smoking and drinking, however remained perfectly strong and healthy despite the odd hangover here and there throughout the first half of the series. This changed in ''Thunderball'' (1961) which opens with Bond failing a medical (a thinly veiled copy of Fleming's own) and being sent to a health farm (something that Fleming himself was ordered by his doctor to do). There is also the line he gives to Moneypenny ''I would rather die of drink than of thirst'' which was reputedly a favorite line of Fleming's to anyone who told him to stop drinking. By ''On Her Majesty's Secret Service'' (1963) Bond admits that he ''needs'' three drinks for every one that Bond girl Tracy drinks, and confesses to having tried and failed multiple times to quit the mountainous amount of cigarettes that he gets through (according to friends, this was a fair piece of self-reflection by Fleming). In ''You Only Live Twice'' (1964) which was the last book to be released during his lifetime, Bond is a depressed, drunken shadow of a man due to a death close to him. Is it hard to say if this was another piece of realisation by Fleming, but it is certainly possible.

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* Throughout most of the latter part of his life, Ian Fleming ''Creator/IanFleming'' was a heavy smoker and an alcoholic; at his height he was managing seventy cigarettes and at least a bottle of spirits a day. By 1964 at the age of 56 these things tragically cut short his life. What is interesting to note is that we know that he was suffering greatly by 1960, and his Bond books written after this time take on new meaning if they are read with this in mind as Bond grows darker and sicker with each installment.\\\
Bond shared his creator's love of smoking and drinking, however remained perfectly strong and healthy despite the odd hangover here and there throughout the first half of the series. This changed in ''Thunderball'' ''Literature/{{Thunderball}}'' (1961) which opens with Bond failing a medical (a thinly veiled copy of Fleming's own) and being sent to a health farm (something that Fleming himself was ordered by his doctor to do). There is also the line he gives to Moneypenny ''I would rather die of drink than of thirst'' which was reputedly a favorite line of Fleming's to anyone who told him to stop drinking. By ''On Her Majesty's Secret Service'' ''Literature/OnHerMajestysSecretService'' (1963) Bond admits that he ''needs'' three drinks for every one that Bond girl Tracy drinks, and confesses to having tried and failed multiple times to quit the mountainous amount of cigarettes that he gets through (according to friends, this was a fair piece of self-reflection by Fleming). In ''You Only Live Twice'' ''Literature/YouOnlyLiveTwice'' (1964) which was the last book to be released during his lifetime, Bond is a depressed, drunken shadow of a man due to a death close to him. Is it hard to say if this was another piece of realisation by Fleming, but it is certainly possible.
18th Mar '16 8:04:30 AM thatsnumberwang
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Added DiffLines:

* Throughout most of the latter part of his life, Ian Fleming was a heavy smoker and an alcoholic; at his height he was managing seventy cigarettes and at least a bottle of spirits a day. By 1964 at the age of 56 these things tragically cut short his life. What is interesting to note is that we know that he was suffering greatly by 1960, and his Bond books written after this time take on new meaning if they are read with this in mind as Bond grows darker and sicker with each installment.\\\
Bond shared his creator's love of smoking and drinking, however remained perfectly strong and healthy despite the odd hangover here and there throughout the first half of the series. This changed in ''Thunderball'' (1961) which opens with Bond failing a medical (a thinly veiled copy of Fleming's own) and being sent to a health farm (something that Fleming himself was ordered by his doctor to do). There is also the line he gives to Moneypenny ''I would rather die of drink than of thirst'' which was reputedly a favorite line of Fleming's to anyone who told him to stop drinking. By ''On Her Majesty's Secret Service'' (1963) Bond admits that he ''needs'' three drinks for every one that Bond girl Tracy drinks, and confesses to having tried and failed multiple times to quit the mountainous amount of cigarettes that he gets through (according to friends, this was a fair piece of self-reflection by Fleming). In ''You Only Live Twice'' (1964) which was the last book to be released during his lifetime, Bond is a depressed, drunken shadow of a man due to a death close to him. Is it hard to say if this was another piece of realisation by Fleming, but it is certainly possible.
8th Mar '16 2:00:49 PM 2Strange4U
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* Creator/TerryPratchett was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's Disease, and then wrote ''{{Nation}}'', a book about losing faith and salvaging life in the aftermath of [[AfterTheEnd a horrible disaster]]. From the guy who continues to bring you Literature/{{Discworld}}, there's quite a lot in this book that [[TearJerker just isn't funny]].
** Several of Pratchett's characters in Literature/{{Discworld}} books after his diagnosis have begun to show signs of aging: memory lapses, decreased physical endurance, etc. They tend to keep forging ahead by sheer willpower for as long as possible. For instance, in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', Sam Vimes' old antagonist Lord Rust is seen as old, worn-out, and confined to a wheelchair, looking nearer to Death than Vimes would have thought possible. Lacking the energy to pursue old arguments, the two men conclude a sort of peace and are actually civil to each other for the first time ever; later on in the book, Rust is recorded as conceding Vimes is a man of great honour and integrity. For the former virile and proud Rust, this would have been unthinkable. Is this sort of thing Terry's way of putting his worldly affairs in order, by having old enemies in his novels conclude truces?

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* Creator/TerryPratchett was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's Disease, and then wrote ''{{Nation}}'', a book about losing faith and salvaging life in the aftermath of [[AfterTheEnd a horrible disaster]]. From the guy who continues continued to bring you Literature/{{Discworld}}, there's quite a lot in this book that [[TearJerker just isn't funny]].
** Several of Pratchett's characters in Literature/{{Discworld}} books after his diagnosis have had begun to show signs of aging: memory lapses, decreased physical endurance, etc. They tend to keep forging ahead by sheer willpower for as long as possible. For instance, in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', Sam Vimes' old antagonist Lord Rust is seen as old, worn-out, and confined to a wheelchair, looking nearer to Death than Vimes would have thought possible. Lacking the energy to pursue old arguments, the two men conclude a sort of peace and are actually civil to each other for the first time ever; later on in the book, Rust is recorded as conceding Vimes is a man of great honour and integrity. For the former virile and proud Rust, this would have been unthinkable. Is this sort of thing Terry's way of putting his worldly affairs in order, by having old enemies in his novels conclude truces?
31st Jan '16 6:24:07 PM GrammarNavi
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* TadWilliams went through a painful divorce during the writing of the third novel of ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'', and noted in his commentary that he was concerned about it affecting the mood of the story. In a possible aversion, he decided to go with a [[EarnYourHappyEnding semi-happy]] ending rather than the KillEmAll version he had been contemplating.

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* TadWilliams Creator/TadWilliams went through a painful divorce during the writing of the third novel of ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'', and noted in his commentary that he was concerned about it affecting the mood of the story. In a possible aversion, he decided to go with a [[EarnYourHappyEnding semi-happy]] ending rather than the KillEmAll version he had been contemplating.
14th Dec '15 3:40:33 PM Doug86
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* After the death of his wife Louisa in 1906, and the death of his son Kingsley, his brother Innes, his two brothers-in-law (one of whom was E. W. Hornung, the creator of the literary character {{Raffles}}), and his two nephews shortly after World War I, Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle sank into depression. He found solace supporting Spiritualism and its alleged scientific proof of existence beyond the grave. He then wrote ''The Land of Mist'', a novel-length tract justifying the author's conversion to Spiritualism, including having ultra-rationalist Literature/ProfessorChallenger convert to Spiritualism. There is a suggestion in chapter two that the deaths of "ten million young men" in WorldWarI was punishment by the Central Intelligence for humanity's laughing at the alleged evidence for life after death.

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* After the death of his wife Louisa in 1906, and the death of his son Kingsley, his brother Innes, his two brothers-in-law (one of whom was E. W. Hornung, the creator of the literary character {{Raffles}}), Literature/{{Raffles}}), and his two nephews shortly after World War I, Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle sank into depression. He found solace supporting Spiritualism and its alleged scientific proof of existence beyond the grave. He then wrote ''The Land of Mist'', a novel-length tract justifying the author's conversion to Spiritualism, including having ultra-rationalist Literature/ProfessorChallenger convert to Spiritualism. There is a suggestion in chapter two that the deaths of "ten million young men" in WorldWarI was punishment by the Central Intelligence for humanity's laughing at the alleged evidence for life after death.
26th Nov '15 8:59:51 AM SteveMB
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** She's also admitted that in the earliest conceptual stages, Harry's parents were rather callously killed off for the simple reason that a hero without parents is more flexible. However, her own mother passed away before Rowling could tell her about the project, and this transformed the death of Harry's parents from a matter of plot convenience into a central theme of the story, with the loving bravery of Harry's mother being the key reason for his survival.

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** She's also admitted that in the earliest conceptual stages, Harry's parents were rather callously killed off for the simple reason that [[ConvenientlyAnOrphan a hero without parents is more flexible.flexible]]. However, her own mother passed away before Rowling could tell her about the project, and this transformed the death of Harry's parents from a matter of plot convenience into a central theme of the story, with the loving bravery of Harry's mother being the key reason for his survival.
7th Oct '15 1:30:24 PM SaraJaye
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* Lurlene [=McDaniel=] started writing [[TearJerker books about dying children]] as a way of coping with the pain of her child's death. That was in 1985 and she's still at it, so it doesn't seem to be working.

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* Lurlene [=McDaniel=] started writing [[TearJerker books about dying children]] as a way of coping with the pain of her child's death.diabetes. That was in 1985 and she's still at it, so it doesn't seem to be working.
5th Oct '15 12:55:17 PM FF32
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* Rice very vocally disowned the ''Vampire Chronicles'' after a (re-)conversion to Roman Catholicism. She shocked pretty much everyone with her next series of novels: ''Christ the Lord''. Yes, from the author of ''InterviewWithTheVampire''.
** That didn't hold long, now she's off religion again.

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* ** Rice very vocally disowned the ''Vampire Chronicles'' after a (re-)conversion to Roman Catholicism. She shocked pretty much everyone with her next series of novels: ''Christ the Lord''. Yes, from the author of ''InterviewWithTheVampire''.
** *** That didn't hold long, now she's off religion again.



* Nathaniel Hawthorne's ''TheScarletLetter'' was composed shortly after the death of his mother, whose family had been accused of incest in much the same way as Hester was accused of adultery. Hence the slew of mother-imagery associated with Hester, especially of Hester when with [[spoiler: Dimmesdale]].

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* Nathaniel Hawthorne's ''TheScarletLetter'' ''Literature/TheScarletLetter'' was composed shortly after the death of his mother, whose family had been accused of incest in much the same way as Hester was accused of adultery. Hence the slew of mother-imagery associated with Hester, especially of Hester when with [[spoiler: Dimmesdale]].
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