History Creator / WilliamShakespeare

8th May '17 11:13:33 AM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Most of the anti-Stratfordians come from the position that, since there are no records of William Shakespeare of Stratford-on-Avon having received any education at all[[note]] (as an English citizen, Shakespeare would have been entitled to a free place at the King's New School in Stratford, though there are no records of this then again, ''no'' school records from that era have survived)[[/note]] and as Shakespeare's only handwriting samples include six signatures[[note]] (Shakespeare dictated his will, as was common at the time; and spelled his name several different ways, though spelling was still in a state of flux at the time)[[/note]]; therefore the successful Stratford businessman[[note]] (at a time when literacy was not a requirement to be a successful businessman)[[/note]] could not have been well-versed with poetry, history, mythology, law, medicine, geography, sailing, and the upper echelons of politics to write so well about these subjects. Hence the alternative authors proposed by anti-Stratfordians are generally highly-connected members of the government, lifelong academics, or commoners with documented ties to noblemen, such as Christopher Marlowe, Francis Bacon, Edward De Vere (the 17th Earl of Oxford), or William Stanley (the Earl of Derby). (Some Stratfordians suggest that the discrepancy between Shakespeare the artist and Shakespeare the business man could be explained by the possibility that Anne Hathaway, his ''wife'' back in Stratford, was the real business head of the family, and conducted Will's financial affairs in his name.)

to:

Most of the anti-Stratfordians come from the position that, since there are no records of William Shakespeare of Stratford-on-Avon having received any education at all[[note]] (as an English citizen, Shakespeare would have been entitled to a free place at the King's New School in Stratford, though there are no records of this then again, ''no'' school records from that era have survived)[[/note]] and as Shakespeare's only handwriting samples include six signatures[[note]] (Shakespeare dictated his will, as was common at the time; and spelled his name several different ways, though spelling was still in a state of flux at the time)[[/note]]; therefore the successful Stratford businessman[[note]] (at a time when literacy was not a requirement to be a successful businessman)[[/note]] could not have been well-versed with poetry, history, mythology, law, medicine, geography, sailing, and the upper echelons of politics to write so well about these subjects. Hence the alternative authors proposed by anti-Stratfordians are generally highly-connected members of the government, lifelong academics, or commoners with documented ties to noblemen, such as Christopher Marlowe, Francis Bacon, Edward De Vere (the 17th Earl of Oxford), Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, or William Stanley (the Earl of Derby). (Some Stratfordians suggest that the discrepancy between Shakespeare the artist and Shakespeare the business man could be explained by the possibility that Anne Hathaway, his ''wife'' back in Stratford, was the real business head of the family, and conducted Will's financial affairs in his name.)
21st Mar '17 2:36:18 AM Az_Tech341
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AntiquatedLinguistics: While much his wording was modern at the time, Shakespeare does engage in a few instances of this. For example, in ''Romeo and Juliet'', Paris' "on Thursday early will I rouse '''''ye'''''" would already have been archaic. Of course today, almost all of what Shakespeare wrote falls under this.

to:

* AntiquatedLinguistics: While much of his wording was modern at the time, Shakespeare does engage in a few instances of this. For example, in ''Romeo and Juliet'', Paris' "on Thursday early will I rouse '''''ye'''''" would already have been archaic. Of course today, almost all of what Shakespeare wrote falls under this.
20th Mar '17 11:17:56 PM MisterDrBob2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AntiquatedLinguistics: While his wording was modern at the time, modern use of it falls under such.

to:

* AntiquatedLinguistics: While much his wording was modern at the time, modern use Shakespeare does engage in a few instances of it this. For example, in ''Romeo and Juliet'', Paris' "on Thursday early will I rouse '''''ye'''''" would already have been archaic. Of course today, almost all of what Shakespeare wrote falls under such.this.
14th Mar '17 9:23:42 AM Goatllama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BlackComedy: Okay, not all of his comedy translates particularly well these days. But the darkest stuff seems to have survived fairly intact for the most part. And could he be a snarky bugger, or what? Be it a straight-up Comedy or one of his Tragedies (or one of the ones you're not sure which it's meant to be), Shakespeare knew how to get you to laugh to relive tension. Or just to creep you out more.

to:

* BlackComedy: Okay, not all of his comedy translates particularly well these days. But the darkest stuff seems to have survived fairly intact for the most part. And could he be a snarky bugger, or what? Be it a straight-up Comedy or one of his Tragedies (or one of the ones you're not sure which it's meant to be), Shakespeare knew how to get you to laugh to relive relieve tension. Or just to creep you out more.
18th Feb '17 7:22:05 PM ImperialMajestyXO
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in their GreatBigLibraryofEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned: many versions printed during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes (the so-called "Bad Quartos"). Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via what's called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootleg printed copies were good or complete enough to be WordOfGod, and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Upstart Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."

to:

For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in their GreatBigLibraryofEverything GreatBigLibraryOfEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned: many versions printed during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes (the so-called "Bad Quartos"). Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via what's called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootleg printed copies were good or complete enough to be WordOfGod, and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Upstart Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."
23rd Dec '16 5:26:35 PM Az_Tech341
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Shakespeare really liked this trope and used it in a number of his comedies. In his day, the practice of men dressing as women for female parts added an [[RecursiveCrossdressing additional meta-level]] to the comedy.

to:

** SweetPollyOliver: Shakespeare really liked this trope and used it in a number of his comedies. In his day, the practice of men dressing as women for female parts added an [[RecursiveCrossdressing additional meta-level]] to the comedy.
23rd Dec '16 3:18:50 PM LordGravy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SweetPollyOliver: Shakespeare really liked this trope and used it in a number of his comedies. In his day, the practice of men dressing as women for female parts added an [[RecursiveCrossdressing additional meta-level]] to the comedy.

to:

* SweetPollyOliver: Shakespeare **Shakespeare really liked this trope and used it in a number of his comedies. In his day, the practice of men dressing as women for female parts added an [[RecursiveCrossdressing additional meta-level]] to the comedy.
30th Nov '16 9:25:09 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''William Shakespeare''' (baptized 26 April 1564, died 23 April 1616[[labelnote:]] {both dates are from the old Julian Calendar, used in England throughout his life translated to the modern calendar, it would be May 6th and May 3rd respectively}[[/labelnote]]), [[SmallReferencePools the only playwright most people can name]], has been a major influence on English language fiction for 400 years. While most only know his plays through PopculturalOsmosis or [[SchoolStudyMedia English class]], the tropes he invented or popularized (to say nothing of a significant portion of the English language) are still with us today.

to:

'''William Shakespeare''' William Shakespeare (baptized 26 April 1564, died 23 April 1616[[labelnote:]] {both dates are from the old Julian Calendar, used in England throughout his life translated to the modern calendar, it would be May 6th and May 3rd respectively}[[/labelnote]]), [[SmallReferencePools the only playwright most people can name]], has been a major influence on English language fiction for 400 years. While most only know his plays through PopculturalOsmosis or [[SchoolStudyMedia English class]], the tropes he invented or popularized (to say nothing of a significant portion of the English language) are still with us today.
28th Oct '16 3:01:49 PM AntoniusMajor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CreatorCameo: He played Adam in ''Twelfth Night'' and The Ghost in ''Hamlet''

to:

* CreatorCameo: He most likely played Adam in ''Twelfth Night'' ''As You Like It'' and The Ghost in ''Hamlet''
3rd Oct '16 11:54:44 AM Nightsky
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in there GreatBigLibraryofEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned, many printed versions during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes. Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via whats called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootlegs were so top-notch that they must be the WordOfGod and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."

to:

For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in there their GreatBigLibraryofEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned, sanctioned: many printed versions printed during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes. troupes (the so-called "Bad Quartos"). Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via whats what's called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootlegs bootleg printed copies were so top-notch that they must good or complete enough to be the WordOfGod WordOfGod, and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Upstart Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."
This list shows the last 10 events of 224. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.WilliamShakespeare