History Creator / WilliamShakespeare

23rd Apr '16 1:04:00 PM erics
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In either case, the "evidence" cited by anti-Stratfordians that Shakespeare's works needed specialized knowledge in [[RenaissanceMan "history, mythology, law, medicine, geography, sailing, and the upper echelons of politics"]] to write so well about these subjects is not borne out by textual studies of the play. The plays are filled with anachronism, historical inaccuracies, propaganda and rumor, as well as quite a few errors in scientific and geographic facts. Moreover, Ben Jonson, Shakespeare's contemporary and friend who wrote the Essay of Dedication for the First Folio, lamented that Shakespeare knew very little Latin and Greek, in other words not someone who was a CunningLinguist by any means, perfectly matching the biographical record. The list of books that Shakespeare mentions in his will align well with the source material for his plays and they were chapbooks written in vernacular. Moreover, Shakespeare borrowed all his plots (as was tradition at the time) and government censorship meant he could not depict contemporary life anyway. Shakespeare's plays are works of artistic genius which means that conventional notions of skill from later eras do not apply. It should also be noted that the authorship debate stems from the fact that there is very little known about Shakespeare's personality, his attitudes and the like. There are no letters or diaries attributed to Shakespeare. However, this attitude stems from the notion of an artist's "personality" which is anachronistic since it was only with UsefulNotes/{{Romanticism}} that the idea of the artist as celebrity came into being.

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In either case, the "evidence" cited by anti-Stratfordians that Shakespeare's works needed specialized knowledge in [[RenaissanceMan "history, mythology, law, medicine, geography, sailing, and the upper echelons of politics"]] to write so well about these subjects is not borne out by textual studies of the play. The plays are filled with anachronism, historical inaccuracies, propaganda and rumor, as well as quite a few errors in scientific and geographic facts. Moreover, Ben Jonson, Shakespeare's contemporary and friend who wrote the Essay of Dedication for the First Folio, lamented that Shakespeare knew very little Latin and Greek, in other words not someone who was a CunningLinguist by any means, perfectly matching the biographical record. The list of books that Shakespeare mentions in his will align well with the source material for his plays and they were chapbooks written in vernacular. Moreover, writte veracMoreover, Shakespeare borrowed all his plots (as was tradition at the time) and government censorship meant he could not depict contemporary life anyway. Shakespeare's plays are works of artistic genius which means that conventional notions of skill from later eras do not apply. It should also be noted that the authorship debate stems from the fact that there is very little known about Shakespeare's personality, his attitudes and the like. There are no letters or diaries attributed to Shakespeare. However, this attitude stems from the notion of an artist's "personality" which is anachronistic since it was only with UsefulNotes/{{Romanticism}} that the idea of the artist as celebrity came into being.



* CrystalDragonJesus: In non-Christian settings, the names may be pagan, but the doctrines and practices are Christian.


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* CreatorCameo: He played Adam in ''Twelfth Night'' and The Ghost in ''Hamlet''


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* CrystalDragonJesus: In non-Christian settings, the names may be pagan, but the doctrines and practices are Christian.
23rd Apr '16 2:51:21 AM Outis
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[[RedBaron The Bard of Avon]]. England's national poet. Often considered one of the greatest writers in the English language. But who was he, really?

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[[RedBaron The Bard of Avon]]. England's national poet. Often considered one of the greatest writers writer in the English language. But who was he, really?
14th Apr '16 12:10:52 AM bwburke94
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Notably, the theory has attracted many high-profile supporters, including such luminaries like Creator/WaltWhitman, Creator/CharlesDickens, Creator/RalphWaldoEmerson, Creator/MarkTwain, UsefulNotes/SigmundFreud, Creator/DerekJacobi, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/JimJarmusch, Creator/CharlieChaplin, at least two recent members of the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts US Supreme Court]] (John Paul Stevens and Antonin Scalia, to be exact, and possibly the only thing they have ever agreed on), and others. The Authorship Question has a few [[http://shakespeareauthorship.org/ adherents]] from Shakespeare scholarship, such as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Stritmatter Roger Stritmatter]] and Oxfordian Shakespeare scholar [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felicia_Hardison_Londr%C3%A9 Felicia Londre]].

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Notably, the theory has attracted many high-profile supporters, including such luminaries like Creator/WaltWhitman, Creator/CharlesDickens, Creator/RalphWaldoEmerson, Creator/MarkTwain, UsefulNotes/SigmundFreud, Creator/DerekJacobi, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/JimJarmusch, Creator/CharlieChaplin, at least two recent members of the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts US Supreme Court]] (John Paul Stevens and Antonin Scalia, to be exact, and possibly the only thing they have ever agreed on), and others. The Authorship Question has a few [[http://shakespeareauthorship.org/ adherents]] from Shakespeare scholarship, such as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Stritmatter Roger Stritmatter]] and Oxfordian Shakespeare scholar [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felicia_Hardison_Londr%C3%A9 Felicia Londre]].
12th Mar '16 6:17:21 AM Ultimatum
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Incidentally, he left his wife Anne his "second-best bed" in his will, which has had historians scratching their heads for centuries. The most normal-sounding explanation was that the second-best bed was the one he and his wife slept in, the best bed was reserved for guests. Unfortunately, muddying up the water is the fact that Shakespeare was quite cold with his much-older wife, spending most of his life away from home. He only married her in the first place [[ShotgunWedding because he got her pregnant]]. Maybe. We don't know much about the man's personal history, and the gaps have been filled with a lot of patchwork speculation over the decades (See Authorship Question below). Shakespeare had three children: Susanna, Judith, and his only son, Hamnet. Hamnet Shakespeare died at the age of 11 at 1596, and the coincidence of the name of the child with that of the protagonist of the famous play has similarly been a source of speculation for the likes of Creator/JamesJoyce and Creator/NeilGaiman.

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Incidentally, he left his wife Anne his "second-best bed" in his will, which has had historians scratching their heads for centuries. The most normal-sounding explanation was that the second-best bed was the one he and his wife slept in, the best bed was reserved for guests. Unfortunately, muddying up the water is the fact that Shakespeare was quite cold with his much-older wife, spending most of his life away from home. He only married her in the first place [[ShotgunWedding because he got her pregnant]]. Maybe. We don't know much about the man's personal history, and the gaps have been filled with a lot of patchwork speculation over the decades (See Authorship Question below). Shakespeare had three children: Susanna, Judith, and his only son, Hamnet. Hamnet Shakespeare died at the age of 11 at in 1596, and the coincidence of the name of the child with that of the protagonist of the famous play has similarly been a source of speculation for the likes of Creator/JamesJoyce and Creator/NeilGaiman.
24th Feb '16 3:39:39 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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Added DiffLines:

* TheJester: A recurring character type in many plays, so much so that scholars has coined the term "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespearean_fool Shakespearean fool]]".
10th Jan '16 9:20:43 PM tropesinreadiness
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Added DiffLines:

* SuspiciouslyAproposMusic: Most of the songs sung by musician characters, though usually presented merely as pop songs that these characters just happen to be singing, end up commenting fairly pointedly on one important theme or another in the play.
** In ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'', Balthazar has a song with the line "Men were deceivers ever." Coincidence? In a scene about pulling an elaborate practical joke? In a play full of deception and distrust of every kind? Not ruddy likely!
** In ''Theatre/TwelfthNight'', Feste sings a lot about the passing of time and the complexity of romantic love. No prizes for guessing whether those are notable motifs in the play as a whole…
9th Jan '16 10:15:17 AM StFan
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For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in there GreatBigLibraryofEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned, many printed versions during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes. Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via whats called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootlegs were so top-notch that they must be the WordOfGod and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theater/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theater/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theater/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."

to:

For most contemporary scholars, this problem has become a quest to find the WordOfGod version of Shakespeare's plays when it seems likely all we really have is the WordOfStPaul at best and the WordOfDante at worst. A lot of the {{Bookworm}} types in there GreatBigLibraryofEverything have been less worried about who The Bard was, and more worried about what was actually written in his own words. While old Bill was alive its hard to tell what publications he might have officially sanctioned, many printed versions during his life-time were shabby bootlegs used as rip-offs by other theater troupes. Contemporary versions of the Swan of Avon's plays rely heavily on the WordOfStPaul via whats called the First Folio, a collection of his plays put together in 1623 by some actor pals from The King's Men. Around the 1700s, editors decided that some of the bootlegs were so top-notch that they must be the WordOfGod and they started mixing them with the First Folio. Since then, scholars have been in an echo chamber debating what can be considered authentically Shakespearean. For example, the ''Theater/{{Hamlet}}'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' we know and love is actually a patchwork of the 1623 Folio and a longer copy published in 1603. Today some editions of ''Theater/{{Hamlet}}'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theater/KingLear'' ''Theatre/KingLear'' have include multiple versions of each play in one book, leaving readers to decide their own WordOfDante version to use. Since the National Poet of England didn't have a Xerox to print off an official copy and fax to his agent, any edition of his plays that claim to be straight from the Crow's mouth are, as far as we can be absolutely certain, actually just ascended {{Fanon}} with an academic stamp of approval. To make things even more complicated, almost all publications today have spelling and grammar changes to help modernize the text in order to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe avoid misunderstandings]]. With all these changes in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what counts as Shakespeare and what doesn't. Yet, for all these inconsistencies, the genius of the Immortal Bard is hard to deny; "confusion now hathe made his masterpiece."
23rd Dec '15 6:02:26 AM LordGro
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* AffablyEvil: Many of his most popular villains.
* AmbiguouslyGay: Some of his characters.

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* %%* AffablyEvil: Many of his most popular villains.
* %%* AmbiguouslyGay: Some of his characters.



* AnyoneCanDie: No one is safe in his tragedies.

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* %%* AnyoneCanDie: No one is safe in his tragedies.



* HumansAreBastards: A main theme of his history plays, also present in this tragedies.

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* %%* HumansAreBastards: A main theme of his history plays, also present in this tragedies.



* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Very common in the tragedies. Most noteworthy in Romeo and Juliet after Mercutio's death and Titus Andronicus.

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* %%* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Very common in the tragedies. Most noteworthy in Romeo and Juliet after Mercutio's death and Titus Andronicus.
23rd Dec '15 3:07:13 AM LahmacunKebab
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%%* AmbiguouslyGay: A fair few characters.

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%%* * AmbiguouslyGay: A fair few Some of his characters.



* RoaringRampageofRevenge: very common in the tragedies. Most noteworthy in Romeo and Juliet after Mercutio's death and Titus Andronicus.

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* RoaringRampageofRevenge: very RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Very common in the tragedies. Most noteworthy in Romeo and Juliet after Mercutio's death and Titus Andronicus.
23rd Dec '15 3:04:33 AM LahmacunKebab
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* MissingEpisode: Records indicate that Shakespeare wrote plays entitled ''The History of Cardenio'' and ''Love Labour's Won'' (which is probably a sequel or something along those lines to ''Love's Labour's Lost''). Unfortunately, no copies of them are known to exist. An 18th-century play called ''Double Falsehood'' is thought to be a rewrite of ''Cardenio'' and was included in the Arden Shakespeare series in 2010. Arden credited the work to Shakespeare, John Fletcher (who appears to have collaborated with Shakespeare on the play or rewrote the play from Shakespeare's original script), and Lewis Theobald (a Restoration dramatist who claim to have "discovered" the play, and probably also rewrote the play to be closer to contemporary tastes). A study published in 2015 confirmed this.

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* MissingEpisode: Records indicate that Shakespeare wrote plays entitled ''The History of Cardenio'' and ''Love Labour's Won'' (which is probably a sequel or something along those lines to ''Love's Labour's Lost''). Unfortunately, no copies of them are known to exist. An 18th-century play called ''Double Falsehood'' is thought to be a rewrite of ''Cardenio'' and was included in the Arden Shakespeare series in 2010. Arden credited the work to Shakespeare, John Fletcher (who appears to have collaborated with Shakespeare on the play or rewrote the play from Shakespeare's original script), and Lewis Theobald (a Restoration dramatist who claim claims to have "discovered" the play, and probably also rewrote the play to be closer to contemporary tastes). A study published in 2015 confirmed this.
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