History Creator / WalterLantz

17th Apr '17 2:08:57 PM RAraya
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* OffModel: The early Lantz shorts were prone to shameless animation goofs.

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* OffModel: The early Lantz shorts were generally prone to shameless animation goofs.goofs, especially before the mid-1940s. Later cartoons made by the studio mostly averted this to a fault, often looking stiff and lifeless in the case of the Paul J. Smith-era shorts of the late 60s/early 70s.
5th Mar '17 9:24:58 PM MagnusForce
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You can find more info on his cartoons, as well as a complete filmography of his work, [[http://lantz.goldenagecartoons.com/ here.]] An autobiography has also been published called "The Walter Lantz Story.", with a new one coming up called "Walter Lantz: Legends of Animation".

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You can find more info on his cartoons, as well as a complete filmography of his work, [[http://lantz.goldenagecartoons.com/ [[http://www.intanibase.com/gac/lantz/ here.]] An autobiography has also been published called "The Walter Lantz Story.", with a new one coming up called "Walter Lantz: Legends of Animation".
6th Feb '16 12:27:53 PM MarkLungo
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A prominent animator and director of cartoons during TheSilentAgeOfAnimation, TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation and TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, and was the creator of characters like WesternAnimation/AndyPanda, WesternAnimation/ChillyWilly, and most famous of all, WesternAnimation/WoodyWoodpecker.

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A prominent animator and director of cartoons during TheSilentAgeOfAnimation, TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation UsefulNotes/TheSilentAgeOfAnimation, UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation and TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, and was the creator of characters like WesternAnimation/AndyPanda, WesternAnimation/ChillyWilly, and most famous of all, WesternAnimation/WoodyWoodpecker.



* LongRunner: Lantz's studio was the longest surviving theatrical cartoon studio, thanks in part to Lantz being accustomed to working with low budget cartoons, and thus having no problem adjusting to the rise of the [[DarkAgeOfAnimation Dark Age]]. However, the studio finally gave up the ghost in 1972, as theatrical cartoons had become completely unprofitable by that point.

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* LongRunner: Lantz's studio was the longest surviving theatrical cartoon studio, thanks in part to Lantz being accustomed to working with low budget cartoons, and thus having no problem adjusting to the rise of the [[DarkAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation Dark Age]]. However, the studio finally gave up the ghost in 1972, as theatrical cartoons had become completely unprofitable by that point.
22nd Jan '16 5:27:34 AM luiz4200
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Added DiffLines:

* ThePardon: One of the Inspector Willoughby shorts features a man trying to escape prison. During the last attempt, he tries to ram the gates but then Inspector Willoughby just opens them and informs him he's been pardoned. He then wants to be let back in prison.
29th Sep '15 12:23:52 PM Mario1995
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Incidentally, he and Creator/WaltDisney were great friends throughout their lives.

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Incidentally, he and Creator/WaltDisney were great friends throughout their lives.
lives. This is likely due to both of their relationships with [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Pictures]].
28th May '15 5:09:51 AM Prinzenick
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* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age. It helped that, unlike producers like Fred Quimby of MGM or Eddie Selzer of Warner Bros., Lantz actually liked making cartoons and had firsthand experience as an animator and director in addition to producing and even editing his own films, so he had a lot of understanding and sympathy for the artists in his studio. Animator Alex Lovy in particular praised Lantz for his in the Walter Lantz Story.

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* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age. It helped that, unlike producers like Fred Quimby of MGM or Eddie Selzer of Warner Bros., Lantz actually liked making cartoons and had firsthand experience as an animator and director in addition to producing and even editing his own films, so he had a lot of understanding and sympathy for the artists in his studio. Animator Alex Lovy in particular praised Lantz for his this in the Walter Lantz Story.
28th May '15 5:09:03 AM Prinzenick
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* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age. It helped that, unlike producers like Fred Quimby of MGM or Eddie Selzer of Warner Bros., Lantz actually liked making cartoons and had firsthand experience as an animator and director in addition to producing his films, so he had a lot of understanding and sympathy for the artists in his studio. Animator Alex Lovy in particular praised Lantz for his in the Walter Lantz Story.

to:

* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age. It helped that, unlike producers like Fred Quimby of MGM or Eddie Selzer of Warner Bros., Lantz actually liked making cartoons and had firsthand experience as an animator and director in addition to producing and even editing his own films, so he had a lot of understanding and sympathy for the artists in his studio. Animator Alex Lovy in particular praised Lantz for his in the Walter Lantz Story.
28th May '15 5:08:19 AM Prinzenick
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* ArtEvolution: The studio went through a fair amount of it. Their earliest work had a very rubbery, bizarre feel to it; Lantz began working with a hyper-cute style in about 1933, while the studio's other director, Bill Nolan kept with the original approach until his firing at the end of the following year, cementing Lantz's cutesy style as the one used by the studio. This lasted until 1938, when Lantz allowed a number of animators the chance of directing, leading the studio's cartoons in 1938-39 having a range of different styles. By the end of 1939 things had settled down to having Alex Lovy as the main director, and their cartoons became amateurishly drawn, misguided attempts at imitating the West-Coast animation style pioneered by Disney and WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes shorts, and suffered from mushy animation. ShamusCulhane tried to beef up the studios art quality with Disney-esque articulation, with varying degrees of success, but this was impeded by indifference from most of the artists, as well as sloppy inking and inbetween work. Dick Lundy managed to bring genuine, albeit budget constrained, Disney-quality animation to the studio during his tenure. From the 50's and onward, Lantz switched to a more conservative, stiffer art style for the rest of the studios life.

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* ArtEvolution: The studio went through a fair amount of it.it, and its worth noting that before the 50s, the studio never really had an established house style. Their earliest work had a very rubbery, bizarre feel to it; Lantz began working with a hyper-cute style in about 1933, while the studio's other director, Bill Nolan kept with the original approach until his firing at the end of the following year, cementing Lantz's cutesy style as the one used by the studio. This lasted until 1938, when Lantz allowed a number of animators the chance of directing, leading the studio's cartoons in 1938-39 having a range of different styles. By the end of 1939 things had settled down to having Alex Lovy as the main director, and their cartoons became amateurishly drawn, misguided attempts at imitating the West-Coast animation style pioneered by Disney and WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes shorts, and suffered from mushy animation. ShamusCulhane tried to beef up the studios art quality with Disney-esque articulation, with varying degrees of success, but this was impeded by indifference from most of the artists, as well as sloppy inking and inbetween work. Dick Lundy managed to bring genuine, albeit budget constrained, Disney-quality animation to the studio during his tenure. From the 50's and onward, Lantz switched to a more conservative, stiffer art style for the rest of the studios life.
28th May '15 5:07:07 AM Prinzenick
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* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age.

to:

* BenevolentBoss: Walter was considered by his employees to be one of the best employers to work for during the Golden Age. It helped that, unlike producers like Fred Quimby of MGM or Eddie Selzer of Warner Bros., Lantz actually liked making cartoons and had firsthand experience as an animator and director in addition to producing his films, so he had a lot of understanding and sympathy for the artists in his studio. Animator Alex Lovy in particular praised Lantz for his in the Walter Lantz Story.
22nd Apr '15 4:21:43 PM TonyG
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* RogerRabbitEffect: Lantz started using this in his ''WesternAnimation/DinkyDoodle'' shorts, used again in the ''WesternAnimation/OswaldTheLuckyRabbit short "Puppet Show", the ending of "100 Pygmies and Andy Panda", and used it again in the bridging segments of ''The Woody Woodpecker Show''.

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* RogerRabbitEffect: Lantz started using this in his ''WesternAnimation/DinkyDoodle'' shorts, used again in the ''WesternAnimation/OswaldTheLuckyRabbit ''WesternAnimation/OswaldTheLuckyRabbit'' short "Puppet Show", the ending of "100 Pygmies and Andy Panda", and used it again in the bridging segments of ''The Woody Woodpecker Show''.
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