History Creator / TerrenceMalick

14th Feb '18 3:58:57 AM Breakermorrant
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For a while it looked as if Malick might be going back into hibernation, but he returned in 2005 with ''Film/TheNewWorld'', a portrait of John Smith and UsefulNotes/{{Pocahontas}}. Like ''The Thin Red Line'' before it, ''The New World'' baffled audiences and critics when it was initially released, but has since been [[VindicatedByHistory acclaimed by critics as one of the best films of the 2000s]]. Six years later, Malick released his fifth film, ''Film/TheTreeOfLife'', a film about three boys growing up in 1950s Texas, which featured a much-discussed sequence involving the creation of the universe. It was met with critical acclaim on its release, and won the Palme D'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. ''The Tree of Life'' is the turning point in Malick's career in that it marked the start of his current and most prolific phase. Between 1970-2009, he had made four features. Between 2010-2017 he put out five films, outmatching his former output in less than a decade. Of course given the uncertain nature of independent film-making and Malick's history of dropping off the radar, no one can be sure how long this will last. He has also become a more public figure, appearing at film festivals and giving interviews, when before he had a reputation for being more aloof than Creator/StanleyKubrick.

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For a while it looked as if Malick might be going back into hibernation, but he returned in 2005 with ''Film/TheNewWorld'', a portrait of John Smith and UsefulNotes/{{Pocahontas}}. Like ''The Thin Red Line'' before it, ''The New World'' baffled audiences and critics when it was initially released, but has since been [[VindicatedByHistory acclaimed by critics as one of the best films of the 2000s]]. Six years later, Malick released his fifth film, ''Film/TheTreeOfLife'', a film about three boys growing up in 1950s Texas, which featured a much-discussed sequence involving the creation of the universe. It was met with critical acclaim on its release, and won the Palme D'Or UsefulNotes/PalmeDOr at the Cannes Film Festival. ''The Tree of Life'' is the turning point in Malick's career in that it marked the start of his current and most prolific phase. Between 1970-2009, he had made four features. Between 2010-2017 he put out five films, outmatching his former output in less than a decade. Of course given the uncertain nature of independent film-making and Malick's history of dropping off the radar, no one can be sure how long this will last. He has also become a more public figure, appearing at film festivals and giving interviews, when before he had a reputation for being more aloof than Creator/StanleyKubrick.
24th Jan '18 9:57:17 PM smasll_lordvoice
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Added DiffLines:

** Among cinematographers, his name is pretty much synonymous with utterly ''extravagant'' SceneryPorn.
2nd Jan '18 6:14:47 PM bodhirook
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Added DiffLines:

* CoolOldGuy: He's often been described as such and the rare public appearances he makes seem to confirm it.
11th Dec '17 5:33:52 PM MackWylde
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* CentralTheme: His films focus on themes of individual transcendence, nature, and the conflict between reason and instinct.



* SceneryPorn: ''Film/DaysOfHeaven'', ''Film/TheThinRedLine'', and ''Film/TheNewWorld'' were all nominated for Cinematography Oscars for a reason. ''Film/TheTreeOfLife'' took this UpToEleven, earning wild praise even from people who otherwise [[Creator/BradJones vehemently hated]] the film.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Usually quite in the middle, but it actually can lead a tad more to the idealistic side.

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* SceneryPorn: ''Film/DaysOfHeaven'', ''Film/TheThinRedLine'', and ''Film/TheNewWorld'' were all nominated for Cinematography Oscars for a reason. ''Film/TheTreeOfLife'' took this UpToEleven, earning wild praise even from people who otherwise [[Creator/BradJones *[[Creator/BradJones vehemently hated]] the film.
* SignatureStyle:
** His films are marked by broad philosophical and spiritual overtones, as well as the use of meditative voice-overs from individual characters.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Usually quite in the middle, but it While some his films can get dark actually can lead a tad more to the idealistic side.
18th Sep '17 10:02:27 PM MackWylde
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Added DiffLines:

* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Usually quite in the middle, but it actually can lead a tad more to the idealistic side.
18th Aug '17 6:01:37 PM dlchen145
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Terrence Malick (born November 30, 1943) is an American filmmaker known for his privacy, the lengthy hiatus between his projects, his idiosyncratic approach to film-making and film production.

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Terrence Frederick Malick (born November 30, 1943) is an American filmmaker known for his privacy, the lengthy hiatus between his projects, his idiosyncratic approach to film-making and film production.
18th Aug '17 5:59:59 PM dlchen145
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Terrence Malick is an American filmmaker known for his privacy, the lengthy hiatus between his projects, his idiosyncratic approach to film-making and film production.

to:

Terrence Malick (born November 30, 1943) is an American filmmaker known for his privacy, the lengthy hiatus between his projects, his idiosyncratic approach to film-making and film production.
26th May '17 2:18:05 PM AwSamWeston
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* ''Film/TheNewWorld'' (2005)

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* ''Film/TheNewWorld'' ''The New World'' (2005)
30th Mar '17 1:36:45 PM JulianLapostat
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* DoingItForTheArt: [[invoked]] His whole career. Malick is independently wealthy (on account of family involvement in the oil business), and doesn't have to make movies to make his living, and when he does he prefers working as an uncredited script-doctor instead of directing projects he's not interested in. This also explains the lengthy production (and post-production) periods of his films, and the lengthy gaps between them. * FauxlosophicNarration: For lack of a better term. Many of Malick's films involve voiceover narration only vaguely related to what's going on onscreen, usually reflecting on the overall themes of the film, the mood and the tone. Many note that his narration is closer to literary stream of consciousness than the usual voiceovers in conventional narrative.

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* DoingItForTheArt: [[invoked]] His whole career. Malick is independently wealthy (on account of family involvement in the oil business), and doesn't have to make movies to make his living, and when he does he prefers working as an uncredited script-doctor instead of directing projects he's not interested in. This also explains the lengthy production (and post-production) periods of his films, and the lengthy gaps between them.
* FauxlosophicNarration: For lack of a better term. Many of Malick's films involve voiceover narration only vaguely related to what's going on onscreen, usually reflecting on the overall themes of the film, the mood and the tone. Many note that his narration is closer to literary stream of consciousness than the usual voiceovers in conventional narrative.
29th Mar '17 10:02:31 AM JulianLapostat
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Unlike many members of the UsefulNotes/NewHollywood generation, Malick did not choose cinema as his vocations. In Harvard, [[TheSmartGuy he studied philosophy]], writing on Martin Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard and other [[UsefulNotes/{{Existentialism}} existentialist]] thinkers. He later worked as a journalist for Life and New Yorker magazine, and had contributed obituaries to Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. He eventually did become interested in cinema, inspired by arthouse film-makers but also by silent film-masters such as Creator/FWMurnau. He studied film at AFI in the late-sixties (Creator/DavidLynch and Creator/PaulSchrader were in the same class) and he found work as a screenwriter, before making his debut in 1973 with ''Film/{{Badlands}}''. This was his BreakthroughHit, riffing on the (then) popular OutlawCouple theme, by making a film about teenagers on a cross-country killing spree. Malick however differed with his incredibly distinct visual style, his poetic approach to narrative, use of landscape and groundbreaking cinematography and production design. In Malick's films, the style matters far more than the stories. Malick followed that up in 1978 with ''Film/DaysOfHeaven'', an evocative, dream-like portrait of a wheat farm in the early 20th century America. The film became iconic for its use of "magic hour" cinematography and natural lighting, i.e. using the actual sunlight and dim natural settings rather than studio lights[[note]]Extremely difficult to achieve at the time on film cameras owing to (then) film stock's limited capacities at recording light, with Malick and cinematographer Nestor Almendros more or less showing people that the stock could do stuff they didn't know was possible[[/note]].

to:

Unlike many members of the UsefulNotes/NewHollywood generation, Malick did not choose cinema as his vocations.vocation. In Harvard, [[TheSmartGuy he studied philosophy]], writing on Martin Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard and other [[UsefulNotes/{{Existentialism}} existentialist]] thinkers. He later worked as a journalist for Life and New Yorker magazine, and had contributed obituaries to Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. He eventually did become interested in cinema, inspired by arthouse film-makers but also by silent film-masters such as Creator/FWMurnau. He studied film at AFI in the late-sixties (Creator/DavidLynch and Creator/PaulSchrader were in the same class) and he found work as a screenwriter, before making his debut in 1973 with ''Film/{{Badlands}}''. This was his BreakthroughHit, riffing on the (then) popular OutlawCouple theme, by making a film about teenagers on a cross-country killing spree. Malick however differed with his incredibly distinct visual style, his poetic approach to narrative, use of landscape and groundbreaking cinematography and production design. In Malick's films, the style matters far more than the stories. Malick followed that up in 1978 with ''Film/DaysOfHeaven'', an evocative, dream-like portrait of a wheat farm in the early 20th century America. The film became iconic for its use of "magic hour" cinematography and natural lighting, i.e. using the actual sunlight and dim natural settings rather than studio lights[[note]]Extremely difficult to achieve at the time on film cameras owing to (then) film stock's limited capacities at recording light, with Malick and cinematographer Nestor Almendros more or less showing people that the stock could do stuff they didn't know was possible[[/note]].
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