History Creator / RonGilbert

6th Aug '16 1:02:25 PM rjd1922
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He is credited as instrumental in forcing the UnwinnableByDesign concept out of fashion, a harsh and omnipresent gameplay component for the adventure genre in the 1980s. According to Gilbert's philosophy a player should not be punished for exploring the boundaries and possibilities of a game, but rewarded. His reformist design manifesto can be read here : [[http://grumpygamer.com/2152210 Why Adventure Games Suck]]

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He is credited as instrumental in forcing the UnwinnableByDesign concept out of fashion, a harsh and omnipresent gameplay component for the adventure genre in the 1980s. According to Gilbert's philosophy a player should not be punished for exploring the boundaries and possibilities of a game, but rewarded. His reformist design manifesto can be read here : here: [[http://grumpygamer.com/2152210 Why Adventure Games Suck]]
Suck]].
15th Jun '16 7:07:32 PM nombretomado
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** ''Videogame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'' (20092010), "Visiting Professor of Monkeyology", TelltaleGames

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** ''Videogame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'' (20092010), "Visiting Professor of Monkeyology", TelltaleGamesCreator/TelltaleGames
9th Dec '15 9:10:27 PM BentusiAvatar
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* Many children's games at Humongous Entertainment, including ''Videogame/FreddiFish'' and ''Videogame/PuttPutt''.

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* Many children's games at Humongous Entertainment, including ''Videogame/FreddiFish'' ''VideoGame/PajamaSam'', ''Videogame/FreddiFish'', and ''Videogame/PuttPutt''.
5th Sep '15 2:35:31 AM TrollBrutal
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* ''Videogame/ThimbleweedPark'' (2016) An old-school adventure [[http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/ co-developed with Gary Winnick]], another famed designer from LucasArts glory days.

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* ''Videogame/ThimbleweedPark'' (2016) - An old-school adventure [[http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/ co-developed with Gary Winnick]], another famed designer from LucasArts glory days.
5th Sep '15 2:34:12 AM TrollBrutal
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* Videogame/ThimbleweedPark. An old-school adventure [[http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/ under development]]

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* Videogame/ThimbleweedPark. ''Videogame/ThimbleweedPark'' (2016) An old-school adventure [[http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/ under development]]co-developed with Gary Winnick]], another famed designer from LucasArts glory days.
3rd Sep '15 3:32:42 PM TrollBrutal
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Added DiffLines:

* Videogame/ThimbleweedPark. An old-school adventure [[http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/ under development]]
19th Jan '15 8:49:06 AM Mhoram
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In the early 1980's, when the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 at the time.

Gilbert promptly sold Graphics Basic to a company named Human Engineered Software and, having meanwhile received his diploma in computer science, started to work there as well. He spent about half a year at [=HESware=], programming arcade games for the C 64. None of them were ever released; the company went out of business. Searching for a new job, Gilbert ended up at Lucasfilm Games. While the name of director GeorgeLucas' company radiated magic and fame in the movie business, the video game department was still small, rather unknown and quite unsuccessful. Gilbert earned his living by doing C 64 ports of Lucasfilm [[UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers Atari 800]] games. Soon tiring of mere rewriting, he was eager to create. He got his chance in 1985.

Ron Gilbert and Lucasfilm artist Gary Winnick had come up with an idea to create an adventure game set in a dark Victorian mansion populated by a mad scientist, his slightly retarded offspring and strange aliens. Not surprisingly, the heads of Lucasfilm Games were reluctant to invest into a man who had never designed a big game before. It took some time and a lot of persuasive talks until Gilbert finally got the thumbs up. The work on the graphic adventure game Maniac Mansion for the C 64 began.

to:

In the early 1980's, when the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's C64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's C64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 C64 at the time.

Gilbert promptly sold Graphics Basic to a company named Human Engineered Software and, having meanwhile received his diploma in computer science, started to work there as well. He spent about half a year at [=HESware=], programming arcade games for the C 64.C64. None of them were ever released; the company went out of business. Searching for a new job, Gilbert ended up at Lucasfilm Games. While the name of director GeorgeLucas' company radiated magic and fame in the movie business, the video game department was still small, rather unknown and quite unsuccessful. Gilbert earned his living by doing C 64 C64 ports of Lucasfilm [[UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers Atari 800]] games. Soon tiring of mere rewriting, he was eager to create. He got his chance in 1985.

Ron Gilbert and Lucasfilm artist Gary Winnick had come up with an idea to create an adventure game set in a dark Victorian mansion populated by a mad scientist, his slightly retarded offspring and strange aliens. Not surprisingly, the heads of Lucasfilm Games were reluctant to invest into a man who had never designed a big game before. It took some time and a lot of persuasive talks until Gilbert finally got the thumbs up. The work on the graphic adventure game Maniac Mansion for the C 64 C64 began.
19th Jan '15 8:46:50 AM Mhoram
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In the early 1980's, when the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 at the time.

to:

In the early 1980's, when the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore64}} UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 at the time.
19th Jan '15 8:46:25 AM Mhoram
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In the early 1980's, when the {{Commodore64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 at the time.

to:

In the early 1980's, when the {{Commodore64}} UsefulNotes/{{Commodore64}} home computer was fairly new, a young college student named Ron Gilbert discovered the potential of the C 64's BASIC programming language. A potential for creating games similar to those he had seen -and fallen for- in the arcades as a teen. Yet harnessing the C 64's graphical power with the crude BASIC compiler was tedious work; a flexible library of commands did not exist. So Gilbert hacked the nights away to create one. When he finally finished his extension (appropriately named Graphics Basic), it was able to move sprites around the screen and perform other multitasking operations that were new territory on the C 64 at the time.
18th Nov '14 6:34:12 AM harryhenry
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He is credited as instrumental in forcing the UnwinnableByDesign concept out of fashion, a harsh and omnipresent gameplay component for the adventure genre in the 1980s. According to Gilbert's philosophy a player should not be punished for exploring the boundaries and posibilities of a game, but rewarded. His reformist design manifesto can be read here : [[http://grumpygamer.com/2152210 Why Adventure Games Suck]]

to:

He is credited as instrumental in forcing the UnwinnableByDesign concept out of fashion, a harsh and omnipresent gameplay component for the adventure genre in the 1980s. According to Gilbert's philosophy a player should not be punished for exploring the boundaries and posibilities possibilities of a game, but rewarded. His reformist design manifesto can be read here : [[http://grumpygamer.com/2152210 Why Adventure Games Suck]]
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