History Creator / NikolaiGogol

3rd Dec '16 7:47:44 PM Xtifr
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'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian]] origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.

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'''Nikolai Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' Gogol (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian]] origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.
14th Oct '16 1:39:32 PM EllaMegablast
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'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian]] origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.

to:

'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian]] origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.
13th Oct '16 4:25:43 PM MarkLungo
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'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.

The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences. {{Cossacks}} are major figures in several of works, including ''Taras Bulba'' and ''A Terrible Vengeance.''

to:


'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian Ukrainian]] origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.

The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences. {{Cossacks}} UsefulNotes/{{Cossacks}} are major figures in several of works, including ''Taras Bulba'' and ''A Terrible Vengeance.''
27th Jun '16 1:03:39 AM PaulA
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* ''Theatre/TheInspectorGeneral''



* AudienceMonologue: In ''The Inspector General'': "What are you laughing at? You are laughing at yourselves!"



* GermanRussians: The doctor from ''The Inspector General'', who can't even speak Russian.
* TheInspectorIsComing: In ''The Inspector General'', corrupt local government officials panic when they hear there's an inspector in town, but the guy they suspect of being him is a case of mistaken identity.



* MassOhCrap: The famous "silent scene" in ''The Inspector General'' is an epic, several minute long Mass "Oh, Crap!" moment, described in great detail.
* MistakenForSpecialGuest: ''The Inspector General'' starts this way, with a poor but foppish gentleman visiting a small town and ending up mistaken for a government inspector by the local corrupt bureaucrats. He quickly understands what's going on, and uses the situation to swindle a neat sum out of the locals. Then he leaves and the real [=McCoy=] comes...



* OneSteveLimit:
** Averted in "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich", depending on how much weight you give to the fact that they have different patronymics.
** Averted in ''The Inspector General'', which features two (unrelated) characters named Piotr Ivanovich Bobchevsky and Piotr Ivanovich Dobchevsky.
* PermanentElectedOfficial: The character translated as Mayor in ''The Inspector General'', who is a powerful CorruptHick with more powers than a mayor would be thought of as having. This being Czarist Russia, there was neither a press nor was central bureaucracy as strong as today.
* RodentsOfUnusualSize: In ''The Inspector General'', one character dreams of two "Rodents of Unusual Size" the night before receiving the letter that the inspector is secretly coming to town.
* ThoseTwoGuys: Bobchinsky and Dobchinsky in ''The Inspector General''.

to:

* OneSteveLimit:
**
OneSteveLimit: Averted in "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich", depending on how much weight you give to the fact that they have different patronymics.
** Averted in ''The Inspector General'', which features two (unrelated) characters named Piotr Ivanovich Bobchevsky and Piotr Ivanovich Dobchevsky.
* PermanentElectedOfficial: The character translated as Mayor in ''The Inspector General'', who is a powerful CorruptHick with more powers than a mayor would be thought of as having. This being Czarist Russia, there was neither a press nor was central bureaucracy as strong as today.
* RodentsOfUnusualSize: In ''The Inspector General'', one character dreams of two "Rodents of Unusual Size" the night before receiving the letter that the inspector is secretly coming to town.
* ThoseTwoGuys: Bobchinsky and Dobchinsky in ''The Inspector General''.
patronymics.
27th Jun '16 12:39:11 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* PermanentElectedOfficial: The character translated as Mayor in ''The Inspector General'', who is a powerful CorruptHick with more powers than a mayor would be thought of as having. This being Czarist Russia, there was neither a press nor was central bureaucracy as strong as today.
* RodentsOfUnusualSize: In ''The Inspector General'', one character dreams of two "Rodents of Unusual Size" the night before receiving the letter that the inspector is secretly coming to town.
27th Jun '16 12:29:58 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:


!!Other works contain examples of:

* AnimateBodyParts: "The Nose" is about a man whose nose flees and disguises itself as a human. It should be mentioned that the Russian name of the story, "Nos", is the Russian word for "dream" backwards.
* AudienceMonologue: In ''The Inspector General'': "What are you laughing at? You are laughing at yourselves!"
* GenreShift: "The Overcoat" is set in nineteenth-century Russia and appears to have no elements of the supernatural at all. Then, in the last few pages, [[spoiler:the main character dies and comes back as a zombie]].
* GermanRussians: The doctor from ''The Inspector General'', who can't even speak Russian.
* TheInspectorIsComing: In ''The Inspector General'', corrupt local government officials panic when they hear there's an inspector in town, but the guy they suspect of being him is a case of mistaken identity.
* InvoluntaryDance: The end of "The Lost Letter": the only thing that remains following his ordeal is the fact that once a year, on the date he met the group of demons, his wife has an uncontrollable urge to dance and does, with no way of stopping her.
* LivingApart: Kovaliov's nose in "The Nose".
* MassOhCrap: The famous "silent scene" in ''The Inspector General'' is an epic, several minute long Mass "Oh, Crap!" moment, described in great detail.
* MistakenForSpecialGuest: ''The Inspector General'' starts this way, with a poor but foppish gentleman visiting a small town and ending up mistaken for a government inspector by the local corrupt bureaucrats. He quickly understands what's going on, and uses the situation to swindle a neat sum out of the locals. Then he leaves and the real [=McCoy=] comes...
* TheNoseless: "The Nose" is about a man who ends up noseless and finds out that his nose has taken a life of its own and run away, wearing a nice uniform.
* OneSteveLimit:
** Averted in "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich", depending on how much weight you give to the fact that they have different patronymics.
** Averted in ''The Inspector General'', which features two (unrelated) characters named Piotr Ivanovich Bobchevsky and Piotr Ivanovich Dobchevsky.
* ThoseTwoGuys: Bobchinsky and Dobchinsky in ''The Inspector General''.
26th Apr '16 8:53:35 PM Winter
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The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences.

to:

The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences.
influences. {{Cossacks}} are major figures in several of works, including ''Taras Bulba'' and ''A Terrible Vengeance.''
7th Dec '15 12:38:33 PM Exxolon
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http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/220px-NV_Gogol_7829.png

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http://static.[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/220px-NV_Gogol_7829.pngpng]]
5th May '15 4:18:21 PM Winter
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The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences.

to:

The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences.
7th Jun '13 5:53:16 AM BokhuraBurnes
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* ''Literature/TarasBulba''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.NikolaiGogol