History Creator / Moliere

25th Mar '18 12:23:41 PM TheBigBopper
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* CelebrityParadox: Might be the TropeMaker. In ''The Imaginary Invalid'', which satirizes the medicine of the era, the brother of Argan (the hypochondriac main character) asks him if he would like to see a Moliére play. Argan angrily berates Moliére for making fun of doctors.

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* CelebrityParadox: Might be the TropeMaker. In ''The Imaginary Invalid'', which satirizes the medicine of the era, the brother of Argan (the hypochondriac main character) asks him if he would like to see a Moliére play. Argan angrily berates Moliére for making fun of doctors.
18th Feb '18 6:08:22 PM erracht
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* ParentalMarriageVeto: In ''Le Bourgeois gentilhomme'', M. Jourdain, a recently ennobled bourgeois who has become uppity due to his rise in rank, refuses to let an otherwise perfectly eligible young man, who is not a nobleman himself, marry his daughter. Circumventing that veto for the young couple becomes the main plot of the rest of the play.

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* ParentalMarriageVeto: In ''Le Bourgeois gentilhomme'', M. Jourdain, a recently ennobled wealthy bourgeois who has become uppity due to his rise in rank, aspirations to join the ranks of the nobility, refuses to let an otherwise perfectly eligible young man, who is not a nobleman himself, marry his daughter. Circumventing that veto for the young couple becomes the main plot of the rest of the play.
1st Feb '18 9:58:58 PM erracht
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* TakingTheVeil: In ''Les Précieuses ridicules'', Gorgibus threatens Magdelon and Cathos that if they are not married soon, "you will be nuns", I.E. he will dispose of his daughter and niece in a convent.

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* TakingTheVeil: In ''Les Précieuses ridicules'', Gorgibus threatens Magdelon and Cathos that if they are not married soon, "you will shall be nuns", I.E. he will dispose of his daughter and niece in a convent.
1st Feb '18 9:30:37 PM erracht
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* TheDandy: Mascarille and Jodelet in ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' are played for laughs as two period fops. [[spoiler: They are actually the rejected suitors' valets, sent by their masters to fool the young ladies who rejected the latter into thinking they are suitors more to their taste.]]



* LeftHanging: The ending of ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' leaves the protagonists' situation unresolved. Gorgibus furiously chases Magdelon and Cathos away with the injunction: "Out of my sight and hide yourselves, you jades; go and hide yourselves forever." Will he kick his daughter and niece out of the house? Force them into a convent like he had threatened earlier? Or will he calm down and will everything go back to normal? Have Magdelon and Cathos changed their opinion about the fashionable manners that informed their behavior throughout the play? It's anyone's guess.



* ThinksLikeARomanceNovel: Magdelon and Cathos, the two cousins in ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' imagine that the way their relationship before marriage to a future husband should play out according to a formula lifted from romance novels. This is diametrally opposite to their father/uncle's resolve that they accept what amounts to an ArrangedMarriage as the right and proper thing to do.

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* ThinksLikeARomanceNovel: Magdelon and Cathos, the two cousins in ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' imagine that the way their relationship before marriage to a courtship with their future husband husbands should play out according to a formula lifted from romance novels. This is diametrally opposite to their father/uncle's resolve that they accept what amounts to an ArrangedMarriage as the right and proper thing to do.
1st Feb '18 7:54:21 PM erracht
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* ChildMarriageVeto: ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' starts with the protagonists, two fashionable young ladies, rejecting the offer of marriage made to them by two young men that Gorgibus, their father and uncle, had chosen for them, and that are more or less unknown to them, because they don't like the notion of their relationship beginning with marriage as opposed to a protracted courtship.



* ParentalMarriageVeto: In ''Le Bourgeois gentilhomme'', M. Jourdain, a recently ennobled bourgeois who has become uppity due to his rise in rank, refuses to let an otherwise perfectly eligible young man, who is not a nobleman himself, marry his daughter. Circumventing that veto for the young couple becomes the main plot of the rest of the play.



* TakingTheVeil: In ''Les Précieuses ridicules'', Gorgibus threatens Magdelon and Cathos that if they are not married soon, "you will be nuns", I.E. he will dispose of his daughter and niece in a convent.
* ThinksLikeARomanceNovel: Magdelon and Cathos, the two cousins in ''Les Précieuses ridicules'' imagine that the way their relationship before marriage to a future husband should play out according to a formula lifted from romance novels. This is diametrally opposite to their father/uncle's resolve that they accept what amounts to an ArrangedMarriage as the right and proper thing to do.



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18th Jan '18 9:30:05 AM SeanPiece
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Legend has it he died on the stage, in 1673, playing the main role in ''The Imaginary Invalid''.[[note]]In fact, he collapsed on stage due to a coughing fit, while playing a hypochondriac. Moliere had long suffered from tuberculosis, but insisted on finishing the performance, then was taken home and died there a few hours later.[[/note]]

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Legend has it he died on the stage, in 1673, playing the main role in ''The Imaginary Invalid''.[[note]]In fact, he collapsed on stage due to a coughing fit, while playing a hypochondriac.the hypochondriac of the title. Moliere had long suffered from tuberculosis, but insisted on finishing the performance, then was taken home and died there a few hours later.[[/note]]
18th Jan '18 9:27:42 AM SeanPiece
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Legend has it he died on the stage, in 1673, playing the main role in ''The Imaginary Invalid''.[[note]]In fact, he collapsed on stage, was taken home and died there a few hours later.[[/note]]

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Legend has it he died on the stage, in 1673, playing the main role in ''The Imaginary Invalid''.[[note]]In fact, he collapsed on stage, stage due to a coughing fit, while playing a hypochondriac. Moliere had long suffered from tuberculosis, but insisted on finishing the performance, then was taken home and died there a few hours later.[[/note]]
6th Nov '17 9:55:41 AM dlchen145
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Moli&egrave (born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 15 January 1622 17 February 1673) was one of the many children of the French royal tapestry-maker. He tried to follow his father's footsteps and later, to become a lawyer, but his heart wasn't in it, and he ended up as one of the greatest French playwrights, and a protégé of King Louis XIV. He's so big in French culture that the language itself is nicknamed ''"La langue de Molière"''. In many ways, he's a rough French equivalent to [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare]], though his stature isn't quite as towering (since unlike Shakespeare, Molière wrote more or less only comedies, while the Bard wrote tragedies, histories, "problem plays" and standalone poems).

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Moli&egrave Molière (born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 15 January 1622 17 February 1673) was one of the many children of the French royal tapestry-maker. He tried to follow his father's footsteps and later, to become a lawyer, but his heart wasn't in it, and he ended up as one of the greatest French playwrights, and a protégé of King Louis XIV. He's so big in French culture that the language itself is nicknamed ''"La langue de Molière"''. In many ways, he's a rough French equivalent to [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare]], though his stature isn't quite as towering (since unlike Shakespeare, Molière wrote more or less only comedies, while the Bard wrote tragedies, histories, "problem plays" and standalone poems).
6th Nov '17 9:55:28 AM dlchen145
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Molière was born in 1622 as Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, one of the many children of the French royal tapestry-maker. He tried to follow his father's footsteps and later, to become a lawyer, but his heart wasn't in it, and he ended up as one of the greatest French playwrights, and a protégé of King Louis XIV. He's so big in French culture that the language itself is nicknamed ''"La langue de Molière"''. In many ways, he's a rough French equivalent to [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare]], though his stature isn't quite as towering (since unlike Shakespeare, Molière wrote more or less only comedies, while the Bard wrote tragedies, histories, "problem plays" and standalone poems).

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Molière was born in 1622 as Moli&egrave (born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 15 January 1622 17 February 1673) was one of the many children of the French royal tapestry-maker. He tried to follow his father's footsteps and later, to become a lawyer, but his heart wasn't in it, and he ended up as one of the greatest French playwrights, and a protégé of King Louis XIV. He's so big in French culture that the language itself is nicknamed ''"La langue de Molière"''. In many ways, he's a rough French equivalent to [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare]], though his stature isn't quite as towering (since unlike Shakespeare, Molière wrote more or less only comedies, while the Bard wrote tragedies, histories, "problem plays" and standalone poems).
30th Sep '17 4:19:08 AM Saveelich
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!!Works by Molière with their own trope pages:

* ''Theatre/TheDoctorInSpiteOfHimself''
* ''Theatre/TheMisanthrope''
* ''Theatre/TheMiser''
* ''Theatre/{{Tartuffe}}''
* ''Theatre/TheLearnedLadies''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.Moliere