History Creator / LRonHubbard

20th May '16 1:54:08 PM CaptainCrawdad
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As a writer, Hubbard was extraordinarily prolific during the 30's and 40's, writing both short stories for pulp magazines and longer work such as ''Buckskin Brigades'' and ''Ole Doc Methuselah''. While writing in many genres, he was best known for his science fiction. Opinions of his work are sharply divided, and his later notoriety has rendered it almost impossible to judge his work objectively. ([[http://www.agonybooth.com/agonizer/Fear_by_L_Ron_Hubbard.aspx Although some have tried.]]) Most critics grant that he had at least some talent, and his novel ''To The Stars'' was respected enough to be nominated for a [[HugoAward Retro Hugo]] in 2001.

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As a writer, Hubbard was extraordinarily prolific during the 30's 30s and 40's, 40s, writing both short stories for pulp magazines and longer work such as ''Buckskin Brigades'' and ''Ole Doc Methuselah''. While writing in many genres, he was best known for his science fiction. Opinions of his work are sharply divided, and his later notoriety has rendered it almost impossible to judge his work objectively. ([[http://www.agonybooth.com/agonizer/Fear_by_L_Ron_Hubbard.aspx Although some have tried.]]) Most critics grant that he had at least some talent, and his novel ''To The Stars'' was respected enough to be nominated for a [[HugoAward Retro Hugo]] in 2001.
16th Apr '16 11:49:45 AM Eagal
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* {{Doorstopper}}

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* %%* {{Doorstopper}}
16th Apr '16 11:49:04 AM Eagal
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* BlatantLies: Website/{{Cracked}} gathered [[http://www.cracked.com/article_16337_l.-ron-hubbards-5-most-impressive-lies-besides-scientology.html five particularly glaring examples]].



* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The mythos of Scientology is actually based on a screenplay called "Revolt in the Stars" that Hubbard tried to pitch to studios in the early 70s. It was...complex, to say the least.
25th Mar '16 3:52:12 PM Kalmbach
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Undaunted, Hubbard used Dianetics as the basis for a religious movement called Scientology (known on this wiki as the ChurchOfHappyology). Supporters claim that Hubbard's shift from a psychological movement to a religious one was due to "having discovered that man is most fundamentally a spiritual being". Skeptics have suggested that his true motive was to exploit tax breaks and insulate himself from criticism from the scientific community. This isn't helped that [[WordOfGod Hubbard himself]] has made jokes making light of him founding Scientology, such as the page quote above.

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Undaunted, Hubbard used Dianetics as the basis for a religious movement called Scientology (known on this wiki as the ChurchOfHappyology). Supporters claim that Hubbard's shift from a psychological movement to a religious one was due to "having discovered that man is most fundamentally a spiritual being". Skeptics have suggested that his true motive was to exploit tax breaks and insulate himself from criticism from the scientific community.community, as well as government regulations (the earlier Dianetics Foundation had been hit with injunctions from the FDA for making unsubstantiated medical claims and practicing medicine without a license). This isn't helped that [[WordOfGod Hubbard himself]] has made jokes making light of him founding Scientology, such as the page quote above.
1st Sep '15 4:18:31 PM tropelion
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Undaunted, Hubbard used Dianetics as the basis for a religious movement called Scientology (known on this wiki as the ChurchOfHappyology). Supporters claim that Hubbard's shift from a psychological movement to a religious one was due to "having discovered that man is most fundamentally a spiritual being". Skeptics have suggested that his true motive was to exploit tax breaks and insulate himself from criticism from the scientific community.

to:

Undaunted, Hubbard used Dianetics as the basis for a religious movement called Scientology (known on this wiki as the ChurchOfHappyology). Supporters claim that Hubbard's shift from a psychological movement to a religious one was due to "having discovered that man is most fundamentally a spiritual being". Skeptics have suggested that his true motive was to exploit tax breaks and insulate himself from criticism from the scientific community. This isn't helped that [[WordOfGod Hubbard himself]] has made jokes making light of him founding Scientology, such as the page quote above.
31st Aug '15 3:33:29 AM eliaskelham
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* BrokenPedestal: For some readers, and especially for Hubbard's grandson.

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* BrokenPedestal: For some readers, ex-Scientologists, and especially for Hubbard's grandson.
31st Aug '15 3:20:31 AM eliaskelham
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Near the end of his life, Hubbard returned to his roots as a science fiction author, releasing ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'' in 1982 and the ten-volume, four thousand page SpaceOpera ''Mission Earth'' (no relation) over a two-year period starting in 1985. Both were bestsellers, although how much of this is attributable to Scientologists buying multiple copies in a effort to drive the books up the lists is a matter of debate. '''Battlefield Earth'' got some respect from fans of pulp adventure ([[Film/BattlefieldEarth The movie]], not so much.), but ''Mission Earth'' not. Hubbard died January 24, 1986, three months after the first volume of ''Mission Earth'' was published.

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Near the end of his life, Hubbard returned to his roots as a science fiction author, releasing ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'' in 1982 and the ten-volume, four thousand page SpaceOpera ''Mission Earth'' (no relation) over a two-year period starting in 1985. Both were bestsellers, although how much of this is attributable to Scientologists buying multiple copies in a effort to drive the books up the lists is a matter of debate. '''Battlefield ''Battlefield Earth'' got did get some respect from fans of pulp adventure ([[Film/BattlefieldEarth The movie]], not so much.), but ''Mission Earth'' did not. Hubbard died January 24, 1986, three months after the first volume of ''Mission Earth'' was published.
31st Aug '15 3:19:06 AM eliaskelham
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To cut a very, very long story short, Scientology was incredibly successful and secured Hubbard's fortunes for the rest of his life, but controversy has dogged the movement to the present day. Critics have alleged that the church practices fraudulent medicine, financially exploits adherents, and has a cultlike atmosphere. The church in turn has been very public (sometimes criminal) in battles against its critics. Scientology has gathered a massive {{Hatedom}}, and modern pop culture uses it as a stock punchline, although members of the church remain devoted.

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To cut a very, very long story short, Scientology was incredibly successful and secured Hubbard's fortunes for the rest of his life, but controversy has dogged the movement to the present day. Critics have alleged that the church practices fraudulent medicine, financially exploits adherents, and has a cultlike atmosphere. The church in turn has been very public (sometimes criminal) in battles against its critics. Scientology has gathered a massive {{Hatedom}}, and modern pop culture uses it as a stock punchline, although aside from several high-profile and vocal apostates, members of the church remain devoted.
1st Aug '15 1:13:38 PM Tacitus
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/MissionEarth''
2nd May '15 8:37:17 AM Jayalaw
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Added DiffLines:

* BrokenPedestal: For some readers, and especially for Hubbard's grandson.
** Creator/IsaacAsimov recounts how L. Ron Hubbard accepted many of his stories and in fact gave him his boost forward. They only had minor disagreements over Asimov in some stories not showing human beings as the "superior race".
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