History Creator / JulesVerne

19th Aug '17 4:40:19 AM tkzv
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/FromTheEarthToTheMoon'' and its sequel ''Around the Moon''

to:

* ''Literature/FromTheEarthToTheMoon'' and its sequel sequels ''Around the Moon''Moon'' and ''The Purchase of the North Pole''
13th May '17 2:18:46 PM tropesinreadiness
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ExtyYearsFromNow: "In the Year 2889", published in 1889. (The story's actually by Verne's son, Michel, a creative sci-fi author in his own right, but Jules let Michel use his more famous name so the story would have a better chance of being published.)
4th May '17 1:22:36 PM WillKeaton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Jules Verne's works are [[http://jv.gilead.org.il/evans/VerneTrans%28article%29.html notorious for being poorly translated into English]], specifically by [[SmallNameBigEgo arrogant]], [[{{Bowdlerise}} censor-happy]], [[BlindIdiotTranslation blind idiots]] who [[WritersCannotDoMath can't do math]]. Beware, particularly with public domain translations. His works also suffered from ExecutiveMeddling of his friend and publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel (for instance, changing Captain Nemo's origin to an Indian fighting the English from a Pole fighting the Russians, as France was allied with Russia at the time), who generally demanded happy endings for the protagonists. You see, Verne ''wasn't'' a cheerful and spunky man by a long shot, he always was more on a brooding side, and especially in his late years, his difficult family life and declining health had led him to grow [[HumansAreBastards increasingly bitter and misanthropic]], which is evident from his later works, where he earned a ProtectionFromEditors after Hetzel died and his son (who basically grew up at Verne's home and counted him as his favorite uncle) couldn't bring himself to insist on the changes he wanted.

to:

Jules Verne's works are [[http://jv.gilead.org.il/evans/VerneTrans%28article%29.html notorious for being poorly translated into English]], English,]] specifically by [[SmallNameBigEgo arrogant]], [[{{Bowdlerise}} censor-happy]], [[BlindIdiotTranslation blind idiots]] who [[WritersCannotDoMath can't do math]]. Beware, particularly with public domain translations. His works also suffered from ExecutiveMeddling of his friend and publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel (for instance, changing Captain Nemo's origin to an Indian fighting the English from a Pole fighting the Russians, as France was allied with Russia at the time), who generally demanded happy endings for the protagonists. You see, Verne ''wasn't'' a cheerful and spunky man by a long shot, he always was more on a brooding side, and especially in his late years, his difficult family life and declining health had led him to grow [[HumansAreBastards increasingly bitter and misanthropic]], which is evident from his later works, where he earned a ProtectionFromEditors after Hetzel died and his son (who basically grew up at Verne's home and counted him as his favorite uncle) couldn't bring himself to insist on the changes he wanted.
14th Dec '16 3:32:07 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Jules Gabriel Verne''' (1828-1905) was an influential 19th century French novelist who became famous for his adventure novels and SpeculativeFiction. He is widely credited as being one of the pioneers of the SpeculativeFiction genre (the others being Creator/MarkTwain, Creator/MaryShelley, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and Creator/HGWells). His works greatly influenced several generations of authors, and is often the basis for the modern {{Steampunk}} setting.

to:

'''Jules Jules Gabriel Verne''' Verne (1828-1905) was an influential 19th century French novelist who became famous for his adventure novels and SpeculativeFiction. He is widely credited as being one of the pioneers of the SpeculativeFiction genre (the others being Creator/MarkTwain, Creator/MaryShelley, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and Creator/HGWells). His works greatly influenced several generations of authors, and is often the basis for the modern {{Steampunk}} setting.
5th Nov '16 1:19:43 PM JustTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* FriendlyScheming: [[spoiler: The whole plot of "Tribulations of a Chinaman in China" was staged by the protagonist's mentor, philosopher Wang, to teach him the value of life.]]
28th Oct '16 10:34:50 AM Lyendith
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Jules [[EmbarrassingMiddleName Gabriel]] Verne''' (1828-1905) was an influential 19th century French novelist who became famous for his adventure novels and SpeculativeFiction. He is widely credited as being one of the pioneers of the SpeculativeFiction genre (the others being Creator/MarkTwain, Creator/MaryShelley, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and Creator/HGWells). His works greatly influenced several generations of authors, and is often the basis for the modern {{Steampunk}} setting.

to:

'''Jules [[EmbarrassingMiddleName Gabriel]] Gabriel Verne''' (1828-1905) was an influential 19th century French novelist who became famous for his adventure novels and SpeculativeFiction. He is widely credited as being one of the pioneers of the SpeculativeFiction genre (the others being Creator/MarkTwain, Creator/MaryShelley, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and Creator/HGWells). His works greatly influenced several generations of authors, and is often the basis for the modern {{Steampunk}} setting.
21st Jun '16 12:10:54 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


!!Verne's life, style of writing and works show examples of the following tropes:

to:

!!Verne's life, style of writing and works show without pages on this wiki contain examples of the following tropes:
21st Jun '16 12:10:01 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RippedFromTheHeadlines: Thomas Roch in ''Facing the Flag'' is a thinly veiled caricature of the famous French chemist Eugène Turpin, who invented the use of the picric acid (trinitrophenol, a common dye and antiseptic) as a military explosive and (reportedly, though the rumors later turned out to be false) toured various governments trying to sell them his patent, after the [[ItWillNeverCatchOn French military turned uninterested]]. Verne, a nationalist at heart, disapproved of Turpin's profiteering, and presented his character in a rather unpleasant fashion. Turpin, naturally, wasn't amused and sued Verne for defamation, but lost, largely because of the effort of the Verne's attorney, Raymond Poincaré.



** RippedFromTheHeadlines: Thomas Roch is actually a thinly veiled caricature of the famous French chemist Eugène Turpin, who invented the use of the picric acid (trinitrophenol, a common dye and antiseptic) as a military explosive and (reportedly, though the rumors later turned out to be false) toured various governments trying to sell them his patent, after the [[ItWillNeverCatchOn French military turned uninterested]]. Verne, a nationalist at heart, disapproved of Turpin's profiteering, and presented his character in a rather unpleasant fashion. Turpin, naturally, wasn't amused and sued Verne for defamation, but lost, largely because of the effort of the Verne's attorney, Raymond Poincaré, a future President of France.
21st Jun '16 12:06:50 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BlackBestFriend: Typical secondary characters in novels with larger casts. While he did use some of them as PluckyComicRelief and they often served as a TokenMinority, he almost always portrayed them in a positive light and as resourceful, intelligent and equal to white characters. Best example being ''Dick Sand, A Captain at Fifteen'', where the Black characters who aid the hero are loyal, devoted and brave fighters.
* CreatorBreakdown: A mild form happened later into the Verne's life. A combination of family problems[[note]]He grew progressively more distant from his wife, his son was a good-for-nothing playboy with atrocious business sense, and his nephew Gaston was mentally ill[[/note]], bad health, partly stemming from the very same problems, and loss of some of the closest people to him his brother Paul and his longtime friend and publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel drove Verne to progressively darker views on the life and science, obvious in his later works.
* DarkAndTroubledPast: A lot of his characters, especially those who would've been seen as social outcasts by contemporary 19th century society. Many of them eventually get better and become TheAtoner. Others, not so much...
* {{Dystopia}}: Some of his novels feature varying examples of this. Works with dystopian overtones were more common in his later life, when CreatorBreakdown and RealLifeWritesThePlot started settling in.

to:

* BlackBestFriend: Typical secondary characters in novels with larger casts. While he did use some of them as PluckyComicRelief and they often served as a TokenMinority, he almost always portrayed them in a positive light and as resourceful, intelligent and equal to white characters. Best example being In ''Dick Sand, A Captain at Fifteen'', where the Black characters who aid the hero are loyal, devoted and brave fighters.
* CreatorBreakdown: A mild form happened later into the Verne's life. A combination of family problems[[note]]He grew progressively more distant from his wife, his son was a good-for-nothing playboy with atrocious business sense, and his nephew Gaston was mentally ill[[/note]], bad health, partly stemming from the very same problems, and loss of some of the closest people to him his brother Paul and his longtime friend and publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel drove Verne to progressively darker views on the life and science, obvious in his later works.
* DarkAndTroubledPast: A lot of his characters, especially those who would've been seen as social outcasts by contemporary 19th century society. Many of them eventually get better and become TheAtoner. Others, not so much...
* {{Dystopia}}: Some of his novels feature varying examples of this. Works with dystopian overtones were more common in his later life, when CreatorBreakdown and RealLifeWritesThePlot started settling in.
{{Dystopia}}:



* ExecutiveMeddling: As noted above, at a certain angle Hetzel could almost be counted as a Verne's co-author.



* GloriousMotherRussia: Verne was somewhat interested in Russia -- as was a significant part of the French society in XIX century -- and often used it as his setting, but most of these books were largely informed by this trope: despite the interest, the mid-XIX century perception of Russia in France was largely EntertaininglyWrong. Verne himself never visited the country unlike his literary mentor [[Creator/AlexandreDumas Dumas-père]] -- he planned a Black Sea tour during one of his Mediterranean cruises, but the trip in question was cut short (different sources give different reasons: from cholera outbreak in Odessa to a falling out with his wife).



* HumansAreBastards: Contrary to the public opinion, Verne didn't have any illusions of the human nature and wasn't that shy to show it in his works. This was greatly moderated by his close friend and publisher, Pierre-Jules Hetzel, who had much more optimistic outlook and spared no effort [[ExecutiveMeddling in reigning in his friend's misanthropy]].
* MarketBasedTitle: The reason why many of his novels often have three ''[[UpToEleven or even four]]'' different names, with one of them being preferred in the country where it's being published.
* PhlebotinumDuJour: Much, much of Verne's work feature incredibly widespread and, for its time, almost inconceivably advanced use of electricity. In fact, some of the technologies he describes are still largely out of our reach today.
* ScienceIsBad: A definite note of this can be felt in the late novels after his ProtectionFromEditors kicked in. On the other hand, Verne, who ''always'' did the research, was too honest with himself to fall into this trope completely. For him the science was bad only [[HumansAreBastards when bad people were using it]].
* ShownTheirWork: His [[VindicatedByHistory famously accurate predictions about various technological advances and social changes]] were the results of many, many, many hours of hard work he did in public libraries or by consulting various scientists and experts of the time. He really ''liked'' to do his research, even for things he could have easily [[HandWave handwaved]]. This general attitude and avoiding most far-fetched concepts is what gave him the credence of a hard sci-fi writer in the eyes of modern day critics.
* SmallReferencePools: The books that have their own pages (except for ''ParisInTheTwentiethCentury'') are pretty much his only works that most people know. They represent less than a fifth of his total output.



* UnbuiltTrope[=/=]{{Troperrific}}: Since he's a one of the granddaddies of the science fiction genre, this is to be expected.
21st Jun '16 12:04:08 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BornInTheWrongCentury: Verne was really ahead of his own time. Many of his stories features inventions like space travel that are so accurately described that you would forget that many of these things weren't invented yet in his own lifetime!



* EnfantTerrible: Verne's son Michel, who was for much of his life a good-for-nothing playboy, and even when he became more subdued with age he remained a total loser in business and private life, and his father had to constantly bail him out. What's interesting, despite Michel's erratic behavior, he later made up with his father and became an heir to his archive. As turned out later, he's also basically co-wrote much of Jules' posthumous works.
** His nephew Gaston, the son of Jules' much beloved younger brother Paul, was mentally ill and once shot his uncle to the leg. Verne never completely recovered and walked with a heavy limp until the end. As he couldn't go to sea anymore due to his injury (and because he needed money to pay for one of Michel's many business blunders), he had to sell his favorite yacht, which he always used as a retreat from his difficult home life. This greatly contributed to his darker outlook on society and technological progress late in life.



* ForeignCultureFetish: In his early years, he adored British culture and science, but later became Britophobic for some reason and shifted his focus to Americans. This is noticeable in his later novels, where American and French characters are often portrayed in a somewhat friendlier light than British ones (though the Brits are rarely villains and mostly end up as JerkWithAHeartOfGold characters at worst).



* StarvingArtist: In his younger days, after his father cut his financial support because Verne dropped out of the law school and turned himself to literature. To feed himself, he had to work as a stock broker, a job he hated immensely despite being reportedly quite successful at it. Eventually, though, this trope became subverted when plays of his works and large readership lead to him having a big house in Nantes, a yacht and a comfortable lifestyle.



* VitriolicBestBuds: With Hetzel their letters to each other show that both men rarely shied from rather pointed barbs, especially when discussing their CreativeDifferences, but they remained fast friends to the very end.
This list shows the last 10 events of 88. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.JulesVerne