History Creator / JohannSebastianBach

13th Aug '16 1:14:37 PM nombretomado
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[[DichterAndDenker German composer and virtuoso organist]] (21 March 1685 28 July 1750) whose works represent the culmination of the Baroque era and whose death is generally considered to mark the point of transition into the Classical era. Bach, [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], and [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] are seen as the three main contenders for "Most Sublime Music in Western History," and not without reason.

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[[DichterAndDenker [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker German composer and virtuoso organist]] (21 March 1685 28 July 1750) whose works represent the culmination of the Baroque era and whose death is generally considered to mark the point of transition into the Classical era. Bach, [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], and [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] are seen as the three main contenders for "Most Sublime Music in Western History," and not without reason.
4th Aug '16 1:24:54 PM scionofgrace
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* TheAce: UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat gave Bach a tricky chromatic theme and challenged him to [[ImpossibleTask improvise a fugue on it]]. Bach obliged. Frederick asked if Bach could [[MovingTheGoalposts improvise a three-part fugue]] using the same theme, knowing that Bach probably couldn't. Bach did. Frederick asked if he could [[WithThisHerring improvise a six-part fugue]] on the theme. Bach replied, in effect, "Leave it with me", and after tweaking the theme to make it easier to work with, wrote exactly that and sent it to Frederick, along with a bunch of other pieces based on the same theme. The collection is known as the ''Musical Offering'' and it's regarded as one of Bach's greatest achievements.



* ChristmasSongs: The ''Christmas Oratorio'' and several cantatas intended for Christmas Day; "Jesu. Joy of Man's Desiring" is sometimes used like this.

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* ChristmasSongs: The ''Christmas Oratorio'' and several cantatas intended for Christmas Day; "Jesu. "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" is sometimes used like this.



* DawnOfAnEra: 1685, the year J.S. Bach was born, is widely held to be the year when Tonality in music (as we know it today) was greatly contributed to by Archangelo Corelli. 1750, the year J.S. Bach died, is widely held to be the year when the Baroque period in music history ended and the Classical period began.

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* DawnOfAnEra: 1685, the year J.S. Bach was born, is widely held to be the year when Tonality tonality in music (as we know it today) was greatly contributed found its footing, thanks to by Archangelo Corelli. 1750, the year J.S. Bach died, is widely held to be the year when the Baroque period in music history ended and the Classical period began.



** It turns out quite a few of Bach's organ fugues end this way. Apparently, Bach ''loves'' using the Picardy third.

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** It turns out quite Quite a few of Bach's organ fugues end this way. Apparently, Bach ''loves'' ''loved'' using the Picardy third.



* MasterOfYourDomain: UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat gave Bach a tricky chromatic theme and challenged him to [[ImpossibleTask improvise a fugue on it]]. Bach obliged. Frederick asked if Bach could [[MovingTheGoalposts improvise a three-part fugue]] using the same theme, knowing that Bach probably couldn't. Bach did. Frederick asked if he could [[WithThisHerring improvise a six-part fugue]] on the theme. Bach replied, in effect, "Leave it with me", and after tweaking the theme to make it easier to work with, wrote exactly that and sent it to Frederick, along with a bunch of other pieces based on the same theme. The collection is known as the ''Musical Offering'' and it's regarded as one of Bach's greatest achievements. Bach's skill at improvising must have approached EnlightenmentSuperpowers.
** This goes a step even further. This piece was for the relatively new instrument known as the fortepiano, the direct precursor to the modern grand. The fortepiano had only been created forty-seven years earlier, and was still getting the kinks worked out of it at the time. He basically improvised this piece, often regarded the most important pieces ever written for the piano, and one of the first. To repeat: he improvised this whole collection of compositions around an instrument that was still in its infancy. There have been many piano masterpieces, but this was one of the very first. And Bach improvised it off a theme given to him by Frederick the Great.
* MundaneMadeAwesome and MustHaveCaffeine: ''Schweigt stille, plaudert nicht'', AKA "The Coffee Cantata", which comments on the problem of coffee addiction, is the UrExample.

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* MasterOfYourDomain: UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat gave Bach a tricky chromatic theme and challenged him to [[ImpossibleTask improvise a fugue on it]]. Bach obliged. Frederick asked if Bach could [[MovingTheGoalposts improvise a three-part fugue]] using the same theme, knowing that Bach probably couldn't. Bach did. Frederick asked if he could [[WithThisHerring improvise a six-part fugue]] on the theme. Bach replied, in effect, "Leave it with me", and after tweaking the theme to make it easier to work with, wrote exactly that and sent it to Frederick, along with a bunch of other pieces based on the same theme. The collection is known as the ''Musical Offering'' and it's regarded as one of Bach's greatest achievements. Bach's skill at improvising must have approached EnlightenmentSuperpowers.
** This goes a step even further. This piece was for the relatively new instrument known as the fortepiano, the direct precursor to the modern grand. The fortepiano had only been created forty-seven years earlier, and was still getting the kinks worked out of it at the time. He basically improvised this piece, often regarded the most important pieces ever written for the piano, and one of the first. To repeat: he improvised this whole collection of compositions around an instrument that was still in its infancy. There have been many piano masterpieces, but this was one of the very first. And Bach improvised it off a theme given to him by Frederick the Great.
* MundaneMadeAwesome and MustHaveCaffeine: ''Schweigt stille, plaudert nicht'', AKA "The Coffee Cantata", which comments on where the problem of coffee addiction, entire plot is the UrExample.driven by coffee.



* SincerestFormOfFlattery: Name any great composer of ClassicalMusic. Odds are all but absolutely certain that, at some point in their education, they studied from and imitated the works of J.S. Bach. Bach's fugues and chorales in particular are still required studying in most music conservatories to this day.

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* SincerestFormOfFlattery: Name any great composer of ClassicalMusic. Odds are all but absolutely certain that, at some point in their education, they studied from and imitated the works of J.S. Bach. Bach's fugues and chorales in particular are still required studying in most music conservatories to this day.
13th Apr '16 8:41:06 AM 06tele
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* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: At least two recordings of the Third ''Brandenburg Concerto'' supposedly consist of the "First and Second" movements. As most fans know, Bach only wrote First and Third movements (and a placeholder cadenza to stand in for the Second; it is believed that the musicians were supposed to improvise something leading up to it), and the Third Movement is definitely in the style of a Third, not a Second. No prizes for guessing what the so-called "Second Movement" in these recordings actually is.
13th Apr '16 8:40:16 AM 06tele
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* ActorInspiredElement: Bach tended to work with the same musicians a lot because they, like him, had the same employers, and you can tell which ones he especially admired, because a cantata will show up with e.g. a juicy trombone part. He wrote some of the most florid and difficult trumpet parts of the era, chiefly because he enjoyed for many years the services of one Gottfried Reiche, perhaps the greatest virtuoso practitioner of the natural trumpet. And he loved incorporating unusual and novel instruments into his works, such as the ''oboe da caccia,'' a tenor oboe made of metal and curved in the shape of a hunting horn.



* DescendedCreator: The first movement of the fifth ''Brandenburg Concerto'' turns into a lengthy and highly virtuosic solo for the harpsichord, which would have been played by Bach himself.
* GenreAdultery: J.S. Bach, the composer most associated with sacred music, writes a mini-drama in cantata form about a sassy girl addicted to coffee.
4th Apr '16 3:37:24 PM Classicalfan626
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[[DichterAndDenker German composer and virtuoso organist]] (31 March 1685 28 July 1750) whose works represent the culmination of the Baroque era and whose death is generally considered to mark the point of transition into the Classical era. Bach, [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], and [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] are seen as the three main contenders for "Most Sublime Music in Western History," and not without reason.

to:

[[DichterAndDenker German composer and virtuoso organist]] (31 (21 March 1685 28 July 1750) whose works represent the culmination of the Baroque era and whose death is generally considered to mark the point of transition into the Classical era. Bach, [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], and [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] are seen as the three main contenders for "Most Sublime Music in Western History," and not without reason.
4th Apr '16 3:36:36 PM Classicalfan626
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* DawnOfAnEra: 1685, the year J.S. Bach was born, is widely held to be the year when Tonality in music (as we know it today) was invented by Archangelo Corelli. 1750, the year J.S. Bach died, is widely held to be the year when the Baroque period in music history ended and the Classical period began.

to:

* DawnOfAnEra: 1685, the year J.S. Bach was born, is widely held to be the year when Tonality in music (as we know it today) was invented greatly contributed to by Archangelo Corelli. 1750, the year J.S. Bach died, is widely held to be the year when the Baroque period in music history ended and the Classical period began.
5th Feb '16 1:17:59 PM Stanislav_J
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* ChristmasSongs: The ''Christmas Oratorio''. Probably others as well; "Jesu. Joy of Man's Desiring" is sometimes used like this.

to:

* ChristmasSongs: The ''Christmas Oratorio''. Probably others as well; Oratorio'' and several cantatas intended for Christmas Day; "Jesu. Joy of Man's Desiring" is sometimes used like this.
19th Jan '16 1:27:08 PM Stanislav_J
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* ActorInspiredElement: Bach tended to work with the same musicians a lot because they, like him, had the same employers, and you can tell which ones he especially admired, because a cantata will show up with e.g. a juicy trombone part.

to:

* ActorInspiredElement: Bach tended to work with the same musicians a lot because they, like him, had the same employers, and you can tell which ones he especially admired, because a cantata will show up with e.g. a juicy trombone part. He wrote some of the most florid and difficult trumpet parts of the era, chiefly because he enjoyed for many years the services of one Gottfried Reiche, perhaps the greatest virtuoso practitioner of the natural trumpet. And he loved incorporating unusual and novel instruments into his works, such as the ''oboe da caccia,'' a tenor oboe made of metal and curved in the shape of a hunting horn.
19th Jan '16 1:02:10 PM Stanislav_J
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** Some suggested having ''only'' Bach on the record; Creator/CarlSagan said "that would just be showing off".

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** Some suggested having ''only'' Bach on the record; Creator/CarlSagan said "that would just be showing off".off."
11th Jan '16 3:24:29 PM Stanislav_J
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''Air on the G String,'' the colloquial title given to the 2nd movement of Bach's Suite No. 3 in D major, BWV 1068. Even if you don't follow classical music, and don't know Bach from Bono, it's a certainty you've heard it many times as background music in movies, TV shows, and commercials. A strong contender for "Most Sublimely Beautiful 5 Minutes of Music Ever Composed."
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