History Creator / JaneAusten

14th Mar '18 5:07:48 PM Xtifr
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Austen is well-known for her wit, satire, and proto-feminism; serious critics consider her to be the equal of Cervantes, Milton, and Shakespeare. Virginia Woolf called her the first truly great female author, and the first good English author to have a distinctly feminine writing style. Rex Stout considered her the greatest English writer ever -- yes, even above Shakespeare. Heady praise from a man who claimed to have previously believed that men did everything better than women.

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Austen is well-known for her wit, satire, and proto-feminism; serious critics consider her to be the equal of Cervantes, Milton, and Shakespeare. Virginia Woolf called her the first truly great female author, and the first good English author to have a distinctly feminine writing style. Rex Stout Creator/RexStout considered her the greatest English writer ever -- yes, ever--yes, even above Shakespeare. Heady praise from a man who claimed to have previously believed that men did everything better than women.
9th Feb '18 6:11:12 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* FanCommunityNicknames: "Janeites".


Added DiffLines:

* WordOfGod: The futures of many of the characters, particularly secondary characters, are left unexplained in the stories. Fortunately for us, Austen had several nieces and nephews who were big fans of Aunt Jane's writing, and the letters she wrote to them explain what happened to several characters after the ends of the books.
9th Feb '18 4:11:42 AM fruitstripegum
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* FanCommunityNicknames: "Janeites".



* WordOfGod: The futures of many of the characters, particularly secondary characters, are left unexplained in the stories. Fortunately for us, Austen had several nieces and nephews who were big fans of Aunt Jane's writing, and the letters she wrote to them explain what happened to several characters after the ends of the books.
2nd Jan '18 12:44:49 PM vifetoile
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Despite being nominally romance novels, and writing in a period that overlapped with {{Romanticism}}, Austen's works are not classified as Romantic-with-a-capital-R. Austen strikes a balance between RomanticismAndEnlightenment - her happy endings are born of social harmony as well as warmth of feeling.

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Despite being nominally romance novels, and writing in a period that overlapped with {{Romanticism}}, Austen's works are not classified as Romantic-with-a-capital-R. Austen strikes a balance between RomanticismAndEnlightenment [[RomanticismVersusEnlightenment Romanticism and Enlightenment]] - her happy endings are born of social harmony as well as warmth of feeling.
2nd Jan '18 12:44:06 PM vifetoile
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Her novels are of the Realist school, written with wit and frequent irony, and all follow a similar formula: gentlewoman sooner or later falls in love with man but can't marry him because he's engaged to someone else/he's in love with someone else/etc. Often there are cads to tempt her as well, but ultimately she ends up with the good guy who won't steal all her money or abandon her somewhere. There's far more variety among her heroines in terms of personality, though. She specialized in two types: the lively, witty, restless heroine who never fears to speak her mind ([[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Elizabeth Bennet]], [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Marianne Dashwood]], [[Literature/{{Emma}} Emma Woodhouse]]); and the quiet, StoicWoobie who rarely if ever speaks her mind since everyone misjudges her anyway ([[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood]], [[Literature/MansfieldPark Fanny Price]], [[Literature/{{Persuasion}} Anne Elliot]]).

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Her novels are of the Realist school, written with wit and frequent irony, and all follow a similar formula: gentlewoman sooner or later falls in love with man but can't marry him because he's engaged to someone else/he's in love with someone else/etc. Often there are cads to tempt her as well, but ultimately she ends up with the good guy who won't steal all her money or abandon her somewhere. There's far more variety among her heroines in terms of personality, though. She specialized in two types: the lively, witty, restless heroine who never fears to speak her mind ([[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Elizabeth Bennet]], [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Marianne Dashwood]], [[Literature/{{Emma}} Emma Woodhouse]]); and the quiet, StoicWoobie who rarely if ever speaks her mind since everyone misjudges her anyway ([[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood]], [[Literature/MansfieldPark Fanny Price]], [[Literature/{{Persuasion}} Anne Elliot]]).
Elliot]]).

Despite being nominally romance novels, and writing in a period that overlapped with {{Romanticism}}, Austen's works are not classified as Romantic-with-a-capital-R. Austen strikes a balance between RomanticismAndEnlightenment - her happy endings are born of social harmony as well as warmth of feeling.
31st Dec '17 6:21:05 PM vifetoile
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Her novels are wildly sarcastic in nature, and all follow a similar formula: gentlewoman sooner or later falls in love with man but can't marry him because he's engaged to someone else/he's in love with someone else/etc. Often there are cads to tempt her as well, but ultimately she ends up with the good guy who won't steal all her money or abandon her somewhere. There's far more variety among her heroines in terms of personality, though. She specialized in two types: the lively, witty, restless heroine who never fears to speak her mind ([[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Elizabeth Bennet]], [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Marianne Dashwood]], [[Literature/{{Emma}} Emma Woodhouse]]); and the quiet, StoicWoobie who rarely if ever speaks her mind since everyone misjudges her anyway ([[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood]], [[Literature/MansfieldPark Fanny Price]], [[Literature/{{Persuasion}} Anne Elliot]]).

to:

Her novels are wildly sarcastic in nature, of the Realist school, written with wit and frequent irony, and all follow a similar formula: gentlewoman sooner or later falls in love with man but can't marry him because he's engaged to someone else/he's in love with someone else/etc. Often there are cads to tempt her as well, but ultimately she ends up with the good guy who won't steal all her money or abandon her somewhere. There's far more variety among her heroines in terms of personality, though. She specialized in two types: the lively, witty, restless heroine who never fears to speak her mind ([[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Elizabeth Bennet]], [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Marianne Dashwood]], [[Literature/{{Emma}} Emma Woodhouse]]); and the quiet, StoicWoobie who rarely if ever speaks her mind since everyone misjudges her anyway ([[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood]], [[Literature/MansfieldPark Fanny Price]], [[Literature/{{Persuasion}} Anne Elliot]]).
4th Dec '17 11:40:50 AM dlchen145
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Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English author who lived in the late 18th/early 19th century and wrote six novels between 1790 and 1817 before dying at the age of 41. Her books were published anonymously during her lifetime, but she is now one of the most famous authors in the English language.

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Jane Austen (1775-1817) (16 December 1775 18 July 1817) was an English author who lived in the late 18th/early 19th century and wrote six novels between 1790 and 1817 before dying at the age of 41. Her books were published anonymously during her lifetime, but she is now one of the most famous authors in the English language.
28th Mar '17 6:46:53 PM freyalorelei
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* The film ''Becoming Jane'' is loosely based on her life.

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* The film ''Becoming Jane'' ''Film/BecomingJane'' is loosely based on her life.
14th Dec '16 3:23:38 PM Xtifr
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'''Jane Austen''' (1775-1817) was an English author who lived in the late 18th/early 19th century and wrote six novels between 1790 and 1817 before dying at the age of 41. Her books were published anonymously during her lifetime, but she is now one of the most famous authors in the English language.

to:

'''Jane Austen''' Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English author who lived in the late 18th/early 19th century and wrote six novels between 1790 and 1817 before dying at the age of 41. Her books were published anonymously during her lifetime, but she is now one of the most famous authors in the English language.
29th Oct '16 5:43:20 PM nombretomado
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* [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/austencomics_8446.png This]] HarkAVagrant comic.

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* [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/austencomics_8446.png This]] HarkAVagrant ''Webcomic/HarkAVagrant'' comic.
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