History Creator / IsaacAsimov

2nd Jun '17 2:31:44 PM Tomodachi
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* SocietyMarchesOn: "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. [[NotSoCrazyAnymore And then in 2016, Donald Trump is elected on a platform entirely of pie-in-the-sky promises and racist baloney.]]

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* SocietyMarchesOn: "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. [[NotSoCrazyAnymore And then in 2016, Donald Trump is elected on a platform entirely of pie-in-the-sky promises and racist baloney.]]
2nd Jun '17 1:06:24 PM BrendanRizzo
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* SocietyMarchesOn: "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable.

to:

* SocietyMarchesOn: "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. [[NotSoCrazyAnymore And then in 2016, Donald Trump is elected on a platform entirely of pie-in-the-sky promises and racist baloney.]]
26th Apr '17 7:17:25 AM kilian
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* AbsenceOfEvidence: In one of the ''Union Club Mysteries'', Giswold points out that the female suspect they are looking for (who has been shown to be fanatical about stockpiling supplies she will need) must be post-menopausal as there were no products for dealing with menstruation in her apartment.

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* AbsenceOfEvidence: In one of the ''Union Club Mysteries'', Giswold points out that the female suspect they are looking for (who has been shown to be fanatical about stockpiling supplies she will need) must be post-menopausal as there were no products for dealing with menstruation in her apartment. In another story, he proves that the writer who rented an apartment must secretly be a spy, because it has writing implements but ''no waste-paper basket''.
25th Mar '17 1:52:30 PM pku
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* SocietyMarchesOn: Zig-zagged in "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. Cue the 2016 election, and the idea is unfortunately no longer as preposterous as it once was.

to:

* SocietyMarchesOn: Zig-zagged in "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. Cue the 2016 election, and the idea is unfortunately no longer as preposterous as it once was.
23rd Mar '17 10:09:28 PM Omeganian
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* ShamefulSourceOfKnowledge: "Hostess" has an alien doctor who found the cause for an epidemic on his world, but cannot reveal it without further evidence, since he obtained the results with methods that are Nazi-like for his people.
24th Feb '17 1:26:35 PM LordInsane
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* HomeworldEvacuation: ''The Currents of Space'' ends with a planet (not Earth) being evacuated - its sun is about to go nova.

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* HomeworldEvacuation: ''The Currents of Space'' ends with a planet (not Earth) Earth, but the idea is mentioned, and happens ''much'' later in the setting) being evacuated - its sun is about to go nova.
21st Feb '17 1:44:36 PM esq263
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* TheGreatPoliticsMessUp: The short story "Let's Get Together" and the novel ''Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain'' both contemplate the UsefulNotes/ColdWar lasting past the 20th century.
21st Feb '17 12:11:08 PM esq263
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* SocietyMarchesOn: Zig-zagged in "Franchise", written in 1955 and set in 2008, in which the protagonist mentions a 1988 election winner that spouted off pie-in-the-sky promises and "racist baloney". That may have been plausible in TheFifties, but by the time the real eighties came along, the idea of a presidential candidate winning an election -- or even a major party nomination -- with racist rhetoric was unthinkable. Cue the 2016 election, and the idea is unfortunately no longer as preposterous as it once was.
18th Feb '17 5:02:38 PM faunas
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He was also a founder of the Committee for Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal ([[FunWithAcronyms CSICOP]]), which sought (and continues to seek, as the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry) to debunk most forms of paranormal and (later enlarged to) pseudoscientific claims (enlisting the assistance of Creator/CarlSagan and others, including [[Website/{{Quackwatch}} Stephen Barrett]] who joined as a fellow later).
17th Feb '17 3:42:35 PM esq263
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* HollywoodLaw: In "Galley Slave", when, in the course of a lawsuit against U.S. Robots, the defense counsel calls the plaintiff as a defense witness, the judge warns him that he does not have as much latitude questioning his own witness as he would questioning an opposing witness. In RealLife, the opposite is true.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.IsaacAsimov