History Creator / IsaacAsimov

16th May '16 5:05:00 PM Arcorann
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As you might expect, various of his stories may be found online - notably his own favorite among those that he wrote, "[[http://www.multivax.com/last_question.html The Last Question]]", and one many consider his best, "[[http://doctord.dyndns.org:8000/Stories/Nightfall.htm Nightfall]]".

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As you might expect, various of his stories may be found online - notably his own favorite among those that he wrote, "[[http://www.multivax.com/last_question.html The Last Question]]", and one many consider his best, "[[http://doctord.dyndns.org:8000/Stories/Nightfall.org/Stories/Nightfall.htm Nightfall]]".
15th May '16 4:22:41 PM mavacca
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* {{Zeerust}}: See "Science Marches On" above.

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* {{Zeerust}}: See "Science Marches On" above.in the YMMV page.
15th May '16 4:14:03 PM mavacca
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* ScienceMarchesOn: When robots and computers actually arrived, they didn't work anything like he predicted (though it's worth noting that most other writers of the time were even ''more'' off base). People reading it today might mistakenly think this is a mistake on his part; obviously, it isn't, since there was nothing to use for reference at the time. When he started writing, basic computer theory was still being developed, and the electronic computer hadn't been invented yet. Notable especially for what he thought would be easy and what would be hard are quite different. He thought in 2061 we'd still be using vacuum tubes but have self-aware AI. He didn't think the equivalent of a modern integrated circuit chip would be invented until after tens of thousands of years of refinement.
** To the point where he wrote about pilots plotting hyperspace courses using sextants, reference books and slide rules. On the other hand, while computers were still room-filling behemoths, he envisioned a society in which no one learned to do basic math because everyone had cheap, portable calculating devices.
** This trope only applies to his fiction, though, as all his non-fiction writings about science, especially his chemistry works, are considered to have been very accurate and consistent with contemporary understanding.
** In ''A Pebble in the Sky'' there's an extended section describing the role of proteins as genetic material. The book was published in 1950, two years before the definite experiment which proved that DNA was the genetic material.
** One short story centered around the fact that only one suspect would consider outside of a building to be a safe place to hide undeveloped film, the researcher who lived on Mercury, which had no day/night cycle and therefore would not recall that the sun rises on Earth and would ruin the film. A few years after that was published, astronomers proved that Mercury did rotate (albeit very slowly, three times per year, producing one local day every two years), unintentionally making this ConvictionByCounterfactualClue. Later printings included author's notes to the effect that he wanted to fix this but couldn't figure out how to do it without rewriting the entire plot.
** Whenever this happened, he joked that the scientists should have gotten it right to begin with, and he didn't see why he should have to change his work because of their mistakes.
15th May '16 4:11:50 PM mavacca
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* HeAlsoDid: ''Everything.'' Asimov wrote for every category of book you can name, short of cookbooks.
16th Apr '16 12:14:37 PM Eagal
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* DumbDinosaur: Played with in the stories "Day of the Hunters" and "Big Game" - an intelligent race of dinosaurs who developed guns killed off the rest and eventually each other for sport. The dinosaurs' self-destructive ways [[NotSoDifferent are explicitly compared to humans']].

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* DumbDinosaur: DumbDinos: Played with in the stories "Day of the Hunters" and "Big Game" - an intelligent race of dinosaurs who developed guns killed off the rest and eventually each other for sport. The dinosaurs' self-destructive ways [[NotSoDifferent are explicitly compared to humans']].
6th Feb '16 3:03:21 PM Scorpion451
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Added DiffLines:

** He also noted that this was one of the most glaring flaws in the Three Laws. A less intelligent AI could misunderstand a command and still be compelled to follow it to the letter, or worse, fail to see how an action might ''indirectly'' harm itself or a human. Meanwhile a sufficiently ''intelligent'' AI could employ LoopholeAbuse to enact ZerothLawRebellion, and would possibly even be ''compelled to do so by the wording of the three laws themselves'': the three laws forbid a human to come to harm through ''inaction''.
27th Dec '15 7:20:07 AM Raptorslash
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Added DiffLines:

* DumbDinosaur: Played with in the stories "Day of the Hunters" and "Big Game" - an intelligent race of dinosaurs who developed guns killed off the rest and eventually each other for sport. The dinosaurs' self-destructive ways [[NotSoDifferent are explicitly compared to humans']].
13th Dec '15 2:27:39 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* DemonOfHumanOrigin: In the short story "Gimmicks Three", a man signs a deal with a demon. Ten years of whatever he wants. Then, he is given a test. Should he pass, he becomes a demon (Hell has a growing staff shortage), otherwise, he is a regular damned soul. The demon he deals with used to be a human himself.
24th Nov '15 2:02:06 PM gemmabeta2
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* SelfPlagiarism: An interesting case, when Asimov's original title for his autobiography was rejected, he was told by his publisher, Doubleday, to go look for an obscure poem from which he can steal a ''bon mot''. Asimov returned with the couplet "''In memory yet green/In joy still felt''" which his publisher agreed to use for the titles of the two columns of his autobiography. It was only after the publication of the books that Asimov admitted that he wrote the poem himself.

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* SelfPlagiarism: An interesting case, when Asimov's original title for his autobiography was rejected, he was told by his publisher, Doubleday, to go look for an obscure poem from which he can steal a ''bon mot''. Asimov returned with the couplet "''In memory yet green/In green / In joy still felt''" which his publisher agreed to use for the titles of the two columns volumes of his autobiography. It was only after the publication of the books that Asimov admitted that he wrote the poem himself.
19th Nov '15 8:25:24 PM gemmabeta2
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* SelfPlagiarism: An interesting case, when Asimov's original title for his autobiography was rejected, he was told by his publisher, Doubleday, to go look for an obscure poem from which he can steal a ''bon mot''. Asimov returned with the couplet "''In memory yet green/In still joy felt''" which his publisher agreed to use for the titles of the two columns of his autobiography. It was only after the publication of the books that Asimov admitted that he wrote the poem himself.

to:

* SelfPlagiarism: An interesting case, when Asimov's original title for his autobiography was rejected, he was told by his publisher, Doubleday, to go look for an obscure poem from which he can steal a ''bon mot''. Asimov returned with the couplet "''In memory yet green/In joy still joy felt''" which his publisher agreed to use for the titles of the two columns of his autobiography. It was only after the publication of the books that Asimov admitted that he wrote the poem himself.
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