History Creator / HarryHarrison

9th Sep '16 10:39:58 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HumansThroughAlienEyes: In "The Streets of Ashkelon", a human missionary converts an alien culture to [[UsefulNotesOnChristianity Christianity]]. [[spoiler:The aliens then try to initiate the millennium of the missionary's message by crucifying him and waiting for him to rise on the third day.]]

to:

* HumansThroughAlienEyes: In "The Streets of Ashkelon", a human missionary converts an alien culture to [[UsefulNotesOnChristianity Christianity]].UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}}. [[spoiler:The aliens then try to initiate the millennium of the missionary's message by crucifying him and waiting for him to rise on the third day.]]
24th Jun '16 8:54:02 AM ChronoLegion
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Harry Harrison (1925-2012) was a science fiction writer.

to:

Harry Harrison (1925-2012) (1925-2012; born Henry Maxwell Dempsey) was a science fiction writer.
2nd Jun '16 7:56:54 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


He has also written serious SF, including ''Literature/MakeRoomMakeRoom'', which inspired the film ''Film/SoylentGreen'' (although the film's most famous plot element was not in the book); the ''Literature/{{Deathworld}}'' trilogy; the ''To The Stars'' trilogy; and the ''Literature/WestOfEden'' trilogy.

to:

He has also written serious SF, including ''Literature/MakeRoomMakeRoom'', which inspired the film ''Film/SoylentGreen'' (although the film's most famous plot element was not in the book); the ''Literature/{{Deathworld}}'' trilogy; the ''To The Stars'' ''Literature/ToTheStars'' trilogy; and the ''Literature/WestOfEden'' trilogy.



* ''Literature/ToTheStars'' trilogy



* ArbitraryMaximumRange: ''Starworld'' (part of the ''To the Stars'' trilogy) has the rebel admiral point out to the protagonist how energy weapons don't work due to the energy diffusion problem. Although missiles are being used by both sides, the rebels use linear accelerators firing unguided ''cannon balls'' to gain the decisive edge, then finish them off with a FlechetteStorm of rocket-propelled bullets (fired from the standard infantry weapons of the time) which work well over infinite ranges due to the lack of air resistance.
* {{BFG}}: One of the Israeli commandoes is firing a handheld .50 calibre recoilless machine gun during the attack on Spaceconcert in ''Starworld'' (part of the ''To the Stars'' trilogy).



* GovernmentDrugEnforcement: In ''Homeworld'', the upper-class protagonist is initially surprised at the idea that the proles might be rebellious, as the government lets them have all the drugs and booze they want.



* KineticWeaponsAreJustBetter: ''Starworld'' (part of the ''To the Stars'' trilogy) has the rebel admiral explain to the protagonist why energy weapons don't work in the [[ArbitraryMaximumRange vast distances of space]]. Although missiles are being used by both sides, the rebels use linear accelerators firing unguided ''cannon balls'' to gain the decisive edge, then finish them off with a FlechetteStorm of rocket-propelled bullets.



* PlanetOfHats: In the ''To The Stars'' trilogy, [=EarthGov=] has not only terraformed {{Single Biome Planet}}s, they've also created a unique culture for each in order to maximise their control. For instance the agricultural planet the protagonist has been exiled to in "Wheelworld" is populated entirely by peasants and mechanics, ruled by a group of autocratic Familys.



* SingleBiomePlanet: Justified in the ''To The Stars'' trilogy, in which an imperialistic Earth has terraformed a number of planets (with a [[PlanetOfHats custom-made culture]] as well), each one dedicated to farming, production or mining of one particular resource. The idea being that none of them have the diverse resources [[TheWarOfEarthlyAggression needed to launch a revolt]].



* StandardStarshipScuffle: Lampshaded and averted in ''Starworld''.



* TheWarOfEarthlyAggression: The ''To the Stars'' trilogy has a Big Brother-like Earth lording it over interstellar colonies set up to be totally dependent upon each other. Since each colony requires numerous goods (which they are never allowed to stockpile) each made [[PlanetOfHats only on one of the other colonies]], it would be impossible for a revolt to succeed unless every colony did so at once. Which they do. (It's not not strictly Earth-vs-everyone-else, though. On Earth itself there are several rogue states that cling to old ideals, such as ''democracy'', the strongest of them being [[BadassIsraeli Israel]]. The last novel makes it clear that a revolution can only succeed with a simultaneous assault on the surface and space.)
2nd Jun '16 7:41:39 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''Literature/BillTheGalacticHero'' series

to:

* The ''Literature/BillTheGalacticHero'' series



* ''Literature/TheHammerAndTheCross'' trilogy



* ''Literature/TheHammerAndTheCross'' trilogy
26th Oct '15 9:08:33 PM Micah
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers: In ''Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers'', John claims to be trained in:
-->...spying, warfare, intelligence, brain surgery, proctoscopy, codes and ciphers, blue-ribbon cooking, and murder.
1st Aug '14 2:05:40 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AllTrollsAreDifferent: In ''One King's Way'', second volume of ''The Hammer and the Cross'' trilogy, a troll or "marbendill" is a large intelligent humanoid that sometimes feeds on human flesh, lurks in the water to pull unwary boaters under, but otherwise is rather likeable, actually. Distinguished from humans by, among other things, a much lower sex drive; human behavior in that regard rather amuses them.



** The trilogy ''The Hammer and the Cross'' has a more organized and benevolent form of the Norse religion coming into conflict both with the more traditional Norse religion and Christianity.



* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The trilogy ''The Hammer and the Cross'' is set in 9th century Europe, and the values of the historical peoples of the time are accurately represented; including their attitude toward rape, enslavement, trial-by-combat, and the social status of women and conquered peoples.
31st Jul '14 3:55:46 PM Dalillama
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheHammerAndTheCross'' trilogy
2nd Aug '13 7:48:00 AM Odon
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* StandardStarshipScuffle: Lampshaded and averted in ''Starworld''.
3rd Mar '13 9:02:17 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheTuringOption'' (with Marvin Minksy)
9th Jan '13 8:49:46 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AntiAdvice: At the end of ''Deathworld 2'', Jason tells former barbarian Ijale that her life in civilization will go reasonably well as long as she sticks with Mikah, listens carefully to what he tells her and then does the exact opposite.



* DeathWorld: In the novel (and subsequent trilogy) ''Deathworld'', the planet Pyrrus has very harsh environmental characteristics: twice earth gravity, very high tectonic activity, a 42° axial tilt, and the occasional 30-meter tides. Life could only survive by cooperating temporarily during crises, so every single living thing (plant, animal, microbe...) is psychic. Not just that, but the high radioactivity causes them to mutate and evolve very rapidly. When humanity settles on the planet, they accidentally piss off the local wildlife during an earthquake, causing every living thing to treat humanity as a continuous "natural disaster", driven by one mutual psychic mandate: "KILL THE ENEMY!". By the start of the story, the escalating war has remade everything into dedicated living war machines (tree roots are now venom fanged CombatTentacles, etc.).



* EscapePod: In ''Deathworld'', Jason runs from {{Heavyworlder}} Kerk who, in the grip of irrational rage, is about to ''literally'' tear him apart unless he gets off the ship. The escape pod he uses to get away is designed to be idiot proof: initially it declines to do anything but the safest, gentlest maneuvers, making long-term survival against the ship's guns problematical.
* UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage: Esperanto is the universal second language in the ''Deathworld'' series.
* GardenOfEvil: In ''Deathworld'', due to a misunderstanding, the very peculiar wildlife on the planet has altered itself to wage war against humanity, changing to the point where even every blade of grass has a venomous claw dangling from it.



* GeniusLoci: In the novel ''Deathworld'', the planet Pyrrus has very harsh environmental characteristics; life could only survive by cooperating temporarily during crises, so every single living thing (plant, animal, microbe...) is psychic and part of a planet-wide group mind.



* {{Heavyworlder}}: The people of Pyrrus (twice Earth's gravity) in ''Deathworld'' are the short, stout variety.



* LostColony: ''Deathworld 2'' is a GivingRadioToTheRomans story set on a Lost Colony.



* SelfDestructMechanism: In ''The Mothballed Spaceship'', the protagonists are trying to reactivate a derelict battleship that has been set to self-destruct to prevent it falling into the hands of anyone who doesn't have the correct codeword. Just in time they discover what the codeword is; [[ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish a simple five-letter word]] in [[UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage Esperanto]] -- "Haltu" or, "Stop".
This list shows the last 10 events of 21. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.HarryHarrison