History Creator / HPLovecraft

4th Nov '17 5:33:39 AM CaptEquinox
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** Malone in "The Horror at Red Hook" counts too. He's described as "a tall, heavily built, and wholesome-looking" fellow, "large, robust, normal-featured, and capable-looking". He has a mystical streak attributed to his Celtic heritage and a poet in his younger days, but is level-headed and practical as well.
2nd Nov '17 2:14:22 PM CaptEquinox
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Lovecraft's stories featured not so much fear of people of different (non-White) skin colour, but distaste aimed at "mental, moral and physical degeneration" (a concept prevalent at the time) due to in-breeding, interbreeding with non-human creatures, or even immoral acts such as cannibalism (("The Picture in the House"). In his stories such degeneration could afflict the lower classes ("The Horror at Red Hook") and inbred rural communities ("The Dunwich Horror", "The Shadow over Innsmouth") as well as upper class families ("Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family", "The Rats in the Walls", "The Lurking Fear"). It's interesting -- perhaps even humorous -- to note that "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" was not inspired by fears of miscegenation, but by Lovecraft's own discovery that his great-grandmother was... ''[[FelonyMisdemeanor Welsh]]''. (Whatever the truth of this, there was mental illness in Lovecraft's family history, too, and he was haunted by the fear that he might, like his forebears, suddenly undergo mental degeneration.)

On the third appendage, Lovecraft's stories, especially the Dreamland stories, featured protagonists with dark skin of which he speaks quite highly, and Lovecraft was a great admirer of the civilizations of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and the Roman Empire. He differentiated between people of "noble" appearance and heritage and civilized behaviour contra "degenerate" individuals or tribes, independently of ethnicity or skin-colour. Early in life, he thought that immigrants to the U.S. should learn English and completely assimilate. After seeing a community of Orthodox Jews in New York, he sympathized with their rejection of modernity and over time came to think foreigners might do better to retain their original language, dress and customs, because attempts to "Americanize" often made them look vulgar.

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Lovecraft's stories featured not so much fear of people of different (non-White) skin colour, but distaste aimed at "mental, moral and physical degeneration" (a concept prevalent at the time) due to in-breeding, interbreeding with non-human creatures, or even immoral acts such as cannibalism (("The Picture in the House"). In his stories such degeneration could afflict the lower classes ("The Horror at Red Hook") and inbred rural communities ("The Dunwich Horror", "The Shadow over Innsmouth") as well as upper class families ("Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family", "The Rats in the Walls", "The Lurking Fear"). It's interesting -- perhaps even humorous -- to note that "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" was not inspired by fears of miscegenation, but by Lovecraft's own discovery that his great-grandmother was... ''[[FelonyMisdemeanor Welsh]]''. (Whatever the truth of this, there was mental illness in Lovecraft's family history, too, and he HPL was haunted by the memory of his father who "died insane" and the fear that he might, like his forebears, might also suddenly undergo mental degeneration.)

[[note]]STDs were ''extremely'' hushed up in those days and the link between syphilis and insanity was only beginning to be understood.[[/note]])

On the third appendage, Lovecraft's stories, especially the Dreamland stories, featured protagonists with dark skin of which whom he speaks quite highly, and Lovecraft he was a great admirer of the civilizations of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and the Roman Empire. He differentiated between people of "noble" appearance and heritage and civilized behaviour contra "degenerate" individuals or tribes, independently of ethnicity or skin-colour. Early in life, he thought that immigrants to the U.S. should learn English and completely assimilate. After seeing a community of Orthodox Jews in New York, he sympathized with their rejection of modernity and over time came to think foreigners might do better to retain their original language, dress and customs, because attempts to "Americanize" often made them look vulgar.
29th Oct '17 12:17:16 AM Smeagol17
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** Dan O'Bannon, the original writer of ''Film/{{Alien}}'', is a massive Lovecraft fan (he would go on to direct an adaption of ''The Case of Charles Dexter Ward'') and initially conceived the plot of ''Alien'' as a kind of "At the Planet of Madness"; much of the original story involved the aliens being "gods" to a long-lost civilization who sacrificed victims to them in, and left hieroglyphs depicting their lifecycle on the walls of, a giant pyramid. Many of these ideas would be subsequently reused in ''Film/AVPAlienVsPredator'' (which, just to drive the point home, was set in Antarctica) and in ''Film/{{Prometheus}}''.

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** Dan O'Bannon, the original writer of ''Film/{{Alien}}'', is a massive Lovecraft fan (he would go on to direct an adaption of ''The Case of Charles Dexter Ward'') and initially conceived the plot of ''Alien'' as a kind of "At the Planet of Madness"; much of the original story involved the aliens being "gods" to a long-lost civilization who sacrificed victims to them in, and left hieroglyphs depicting their lifecycle on the walls of, of a giant pyramid. Many of these ideas would be subsequently reused in ''Film/AVPAlienVsPredator'' (which, just to drive the point home, was set in Antarctica) and in ''Film/{{Prometheus}}''.
29th Oct '17 12:16:34 AM Smeagol17
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** John Carpenter's ''Film/{{The Thing|1982}}'' is even closer. Indeed, a genealogical connection is plausible: the film is an adaptation of Creator/JohnWCampbell's short story "Literature/WhoGoesThere", published in ''Magazine/AstoundingStories'' in 1938. Campbell -- who became editor of ''Astounding'' that year -- would surely have been reading it in 1936, when it published ''At the Mountains of Madness''. John Carpenter himself is an admitted H.P. Lovecraft fan, so it'd hardly be surprising if he drew a little inspiration from the story, even indirectly (there actually is some resemblance between the sequences where Mac and Copper investigate the Norwegian camp in ''The Thing'' and the scene where Dyer and Danforth investigate Lake's camp in ''At The Mountains of Madness'', not to mention that the Norwegians weren't in the novella the film was based on...). He even made ''Film/InTheMouthOfMadness'' as a tribute to Lovecraft's work.

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** John Carpenter's ''Film/{{The Thing|1982}}'' is even closer. Indeed, a genealogical connection is plausible: the film is an adaptation of Creator/JohnWCampbell's short story "Literature/WhoGoesThere", ''Literature/WhoGoesThere'', published in ''Magazine/AstoundingStories'' in 1938. Campbell -- who became editor of ''Astounding'' that year -- would surely have been reading it in 1936, when it published ''At the Mountains of Madness''. John Carpenter himself is an admitted H.P. Lovecraft fan, so it'd hardly be surprising if he drew a little inspiration from the story, even indirectly (there actually is some resemblance between the sequences where Mac and Copper investigate the Norwegian camp in ''The Thing'' and the scene where Dyer and Danforth investigate Lake's camp in ''At The Mountains of Madness'', not to mention that the Norwegians weren't in the novella the film was based on...). He even made ''Film/InTheMouthOfMadness'' as a tribute to Lovecraft's work.
29th Oct '17 12:15:20 AM Smeagol17
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* "Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu" -- [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Cthulhu]] briefly wakes, and fills the dreams of men with madness. The first and best-known Lovecraftian [[TabletopGames Tabletop RPG]] is [[TabletopGame/CallOfCthulhu named after it]] and reprints the story in full.[[/index]]

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* "Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu" ''Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu'' -- [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Cthulhu]] briefly wakes, and fills the dreams of men with madness. The first and best-known Lovecraftian [[TabletopGames Tabletop RPG]] is [[TabletopGame/CallOfCthulhu named after it]] and reprints the story in full.[[/index]]



* "Literature/TheColourOutOfSpace" -- A toxic meteorite that's of a colour NotOfThisEarth devastates a small farm in Massachusetts. Lovecraft insists upon using the Commonwealth spelling of "colour", as always. He stated that this was his favorite of all his stories.[[/index]]

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* "Literature/TheColourOutOfSpace" ''Literature/TheColourOutOfSpace'' -- A toxic meteorite that's of a colour NotOfThisEarth devastates a small farm in Massachusetts. Lovecraft insists upon using the Commonwealth spelling of "colour", as always. He stated that this was his favorite of all his stories.[[/index]]



* "Literature/{{Dagon}}" -- A young man serving in the navy during World War I escapes German captivity only to glimpse a strange monster.

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* "Literature/{{Dagon}}" ''Literature/{{Dagon}}'' -- A young man serving in the navy during World War I escapes German captivity only to glimpse a strange monster.



* "Literature/TheDreamsInTheWitchHouse"
* "Literature/TheDunwichHorror" -- Invisible abomination terrorises the Massachusetts countryside.[[/index]]

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* "Literature/TheDreamsInTheWitchHouse"
''Literature/TheDreamsInTheWitchHouse''
* "Literature/TheDunwichHorror" ''Literature/TheDunwichHorror'' -- Invisible abomination terrorises the Massachusetts countryside.[[/index]]



* "Literature/FromBeyond"

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* "Literature/FromBeyond"''Literature/FromBeyond''



* "Literature/TheRatsInTheWalls" -- The narrator, a man from New England, buys an old keep in England that belonged to his ancestors (and which was erected at the site of much older Roman and iron-age temples) and discovers a [[ImAHumanitarian horrifying]] [[MadwomanInTheAttic family]] [[PeopleFarms secret]] that drives him insane.
* "Literature/TheShadowOutOfTime" -- One of his best-regarded stories. A strange creature from the deep past [[GrandTheftMe swaps bodies]] with a modern-day scholar, followed by the latter's subsequent investigations into the years he can't remember.[[/index]]

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* "Literature/TheRatsInTheWalls" ''Literature/TheRatsInTheWalls'' -- The narrator, a man from New England, buys an old keep in England that belonged to his ancestors (and which was erected at the site of much older Roman and iron-age temples) and discovers a [[ImAHumanitarian horrifying]] [[MadwomanInTheAttic family]] [[PeopleFarms secret]] that drives him insane.
* "Literature/TheShadowOutOfTime" ''Literature/TheShadowOutOfTime'' -- One of his best-regarded stories. A strange creature from the deep past [[GrandTheftMe swaps bodies]] with a modern-day scholar, followed by the latter's subsequent investigations into the years he can't remember.[[/index]]



* "Literature/TheShadowOverInnsmouth" -- Man visits a TownWithADarkSecret and finds [[HalfHumanHybrid something]] [[StealthPun fishy]] in [[TomatoInTheMirror his family tree]].

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* "Literature/TheShadowOverInnsmouth" ''Literature/TheShadowOverInnsmouth'' -- Man visits a TownWithADarkSecret and finds [[HalfHumanHybrid something]] [[StealthPun fishy]] in [[TomatoInTheMirror his family tree]].



* "Literature/TheShunnedHouse"
* "Literature/SweetErmengarde" -- In a [[HeAlsoDid massive change of pace]], a overtly comedic parody of hack {{Melodrama}}.
* "Literature/TheTemple" -- A German U-Boat crew is subjected to a series of strange and unexplained events.
* "Literature/TheThingOnTheDoorstep" -- A sweet but weak-willed man marries a sinister young woman from [[Literature/TheShadowOverInnsmouth Innsmouth]] and starts to exhibit disturbing personality changes.
* "Literature/TheWhispererInDarkness" -- A science fiction First Contact story with strong [[GrandTheftMe horror elements]]. A scholar and his pen pal friend discover a colony of sinister fungoid space-faring aliens in the mountainous rural backwaters of Vermont in 1930.[[/index]]

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* "Literature/TheShunnedHouse"
''Literature/TheShunnedHouse''
* "Literature/SweetErmengarde" ''Literature/SweetErmengarde'' -- In a [[HeAlsoDid massive change of pace]], a overtly comedic parody of hack {{Melodrama}}.
* "Literature/TheTemple" ''Literature/TheTemple'' -- A German U-Boat crew is subjected to a series of strange and unexplained events.
* "Literature/TheThingOnTheDoorstep" ''Literature/TheThingOnTheDoorstep'' -- A sweet but weak-willed man marries a sinister young woman from [[Literature/TheShadowOverInnsmouth Innsmouth]] and starts to exhibit disturbing personality changes.
* "Literature/TheWhispererInDarkness" ''Literature/TheWhispererInDarkness'' -- A science fiction First Contact story with strong [[GrandTheftMe horror elements]]. A scholar and his pen pal friend discover a colony of sinister fungoid space-faring aliens in the mountainous rural backwaters of Vermont in 1930.[[/index]]
24th Oct '17 8:44:46 PM CaptEquinox
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Although Lovecraft had a very happy childhood by his own account -- his rich grandfather, mother and aunts gave him just about everything he wanted including free run of the family library -- his early years were marked by loss. His father went insane (from syphilis) and died when Lovecraft was about eight. His grandfather died and his money was mismanaged by relatives, leaving the family penniless. Lovecraft's mother also supposedly went insane (now believed to be severe anxiety) and died in a mental hospital.[[note]]Recent biographers contextualize Susie's "insanity" with the medical view of women at the time and remind us that there was a lot more to Susie than the whacked-out accounts written to make HPL ''look'' like he'd had an eldritch, amorphous, deliquescent childhood.[[/note]] In his adult years he drifted in and out of poverty (mostly in), ate cold beans out of cans, lost his wife, and ended his life with [[ShootTheShaggyDog cancer of the small intestine]].

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Although Lovecraft had a very happy childhood by his own account -- his rich grandfather, mother and aunts gave him just about everything he wanted including free run of the family library -- his early years were marked by loss. His father went insane (from syphilis) and died when Lovecraft was about eight. His grandfather died and his money was mismanaged by relatives, leaving the family penniless. Lovecraft's mother also supposedly went insane (now believed to be severe anxiety) and died in a mental hospital.[[note]]Recent biographers contextualize Susie's "insanity" with the medical view of women at the time and remind us that there was a lot more to time. Susie was an educated, witty, artistic woman who loved and supported her son, and she deserves better than the whacked-out posthumous accounts written to make HPL ''look'' like he'd had an eldritch, amorphous, deliquescent childhood.[[/note]] In his adult years he drifted in and out of poverty (mostly in), ate cold beans out of cans, lost his wife, and ended his life with [[ShootTheShaggyDog cancer of the small intestine]].
8th Oct '17 12:48:57 PM Geoduck
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* "Literature/SweetErmengarde"

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* "Literature/SweetErmengarde""Literature/SweetErmengarde" -- In a [[HeAlsoDid massive change of pace]], a overtly comedic parody of hack {{Melodrama}}.
19th Sep '17 9:34:03 AM Luppercus
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* FictionalReligion: Lovecraft's fiction abounds with strange gods and creatures, an entirely fictive cosmos whose deities are merely advanced alien and/or interdimensional beings who cannot be understood by human minds.
16th Sep '17 6:45:39 PM jormis29
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* "The Music of Erich Zann" -- A student, seeking cheap accommodation, takes a room underneath a strange, mute cellist who plays unnatural music late into the night. He considered this one of his best stories, as he managed to avoid his usual tactic of explaining everything (read: [[NothingIsScarier the tiniest explanation of anything is juuust barely alluded to]]--in the form of a note the protagonist never actually gets to read).
* "The Outsider" -- .[[/index]]One of the prime examples of TomatoInTheMirror in literature. ItWasHisSled may be in place, naturally.

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* "The Music of Erich Zann" -- A [[/index]]A student, seeking cheap accommodation, takes a room underneath a strange, mute cellist who plays unnatural music late into the night. He considered this one of his best stories, as he managed to avoid his usual tactic of explaining everything (read: [[NothingIsScarier the tiniest explanation of anything is juuust barely alluded to]]--in the form of a note the protagonist never actually gets to read).
* "The Outsider" -- .[[/index]]One -- One of the prime examples of TomatoInTheMirror in literature. ItWasHisSled may be in place, naturally.



[[index]]
* And most terrifyingly of all, "[[http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/essays/cd.aspx Cats and Dogs,]]" an almost 6000 word essay on [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking why cats are better than dogs.]]




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* And most terrifyingly of all, "[[http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/essays/cd.aspx Cats and Dogs,]]" an almost 6000 word essay on [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking why cats are better than dogs.]]
16th Sep '17 6:42:14 PM jormis29
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!! Works by Loveccraft include:

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!! Works by Loveccraft Lovecraft include:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.HPLovecraft