History Creator / GilbertAndSullivan

20th Feb '17 2:13:43 AM bt8257
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Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.

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Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] {{Victorian|London}} duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.
6th Jan '17 6:14:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* HalfHumanHybrid: ''Iolanthe'''s son Strephon, who laments that only half of him is immortal while the other will waste away. ([[FreudWasRight Guess which half isn't]].)

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* HalfHumanHybrid: ''Iolanthe'''s son Strephon, who laments that only half of him is immortal while the other will waste away. ([[FreudWasRight Guess which half isn't]].)
4th Dec '16 2:06:59 AM Xtifr
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'''Sir William Schwenck Gilbert''' (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and '''Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan''' (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.

to:

'''Sir Sir William Schwenck Gilbert''' Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and '''Sir Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan''' Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.
8th Nov '16 7:38:19 PM karstovich2
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The Savoy operas are characterised by the topsy-turvy logic of their plots, which often achieve their ''dénouement'' on the basis of some paradoxical ("Gilbertian") legalistic quibble (Gilbert had trained as a lawyer), as well as by their satire of English institutions. Gilbert's lyrics are masterpieces of complicated and difficult rhymes, often employing obscure and topical allusions, as well as three or four foreign languages; Sullivan's serious and romantic music adds emotional depth and tenderness to their often cynical frivolity.

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The Savoy operas were a reaction, in part, to the scandalous operettas popular in mid-19th century Europe, particularly France (as most famously done by Music/JacquesOffenbach). Gilbert and Sullivan wanted to write family-friendly light operas that just as uproariously funny and deliciously satirical as the raunchier productions that preceded them. They succeeded. The Savoy operas are characterised by the topsy-turvy logic of their plots, which often achieve their ''dénouement'' on the basis of some paradoxical ("Gilbertian") legalistic quibble (Gilbert had trained as a lawyer), as well as by their satire of English institutions. Gilbert's lyrics are masterpieces of complicated and difficult rhymes, often employing obscure and topical allusions, as well as three or four foreign languages; Sullivan's serious and romantic music adds emotional depth and tenderness to their often cynical frivolity.
2nd Nov '16 10:19:17 AM Phys101
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* CompletelyMissingThePoint: ''Ruddigore'', has Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" which sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about their kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... [[MilesGloriosus decided not to, just now]]. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.

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* CompletelyMissingThePoint: ComicallyMissingThePoint: ''Ruddigore'', has Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" which sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about their kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... [[MilesGloriosus decided not to, just now]]. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.


Added DiffLines:

* HesitantSacrifice:
** ''The Sorcerer'': Wells explains to the community that at either he or Alexis must die, followed by:
---> Wells to Alexis: [[CaptainObvious I would rather it were you.]]
** ''The Mikado'': Ko-Ko, reluctant to execute himself, appoints Pooh-Bah "Lord High Substitute" as executionee.
---> Pooh-Bah: Such an appointment would realize my fondest dreams. But no, at any sacrifice, I must set bounds to my insatiable ambition!
2nd Nov '16 9:53:34 AM Phys101
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** John Wellington Wells in ''The Sorcerer'' is also designated as the villain InUniverse. When Wells says that the only way for his spell to be reversed is for either himself or Alexis to sacrifice his life, Alexis, whose fault it all is, volunteers -- but Aline protests, so the villagers vote on who should die and unanimously choose Mr. Wells. Justified because Alexis is a parody of the [[TenorBoy stock romantic hero]] and therefore the DesignatedHero.

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** John Wellington Wells in ''The Sorcerer'' is also designated as the villain InUniverse. When Wells says that the only way for his spell to be reversed is for either himself or Alexis to sacrifice his life, Alexis, whose fault it all is, volunteers -- but Aline protests, so the villagers vote on who should die and unanimously unanimously[[note]]Some performances avert the obvious FridgeLogic, having Lady Sangazure (who loves Wells because of the potion) dissenting from the otherwise unanimous decision.[[/note]] choose Mr. Wells. Justified because Alexis is a parody of the [[TenorBoy stock romantic hero]] and therefore the DesignatedHero.



* EvolvingMusic: It's somewhat traditional for certain songs to be updated to poke fun of current topical references. Ko-Ko's "[[ListSong I've Got a Little List]]" from ''TheMikado'' and "The MajorGeneralSong" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' are particularly vulnerable. Gilbert himself sanctioned some of this when he realized that "the lady novelist" on Ko-Ko's list wouldn't always be seen as "[[MostWritersAreMale a singular anomaly]]" and let singers suggest their own alternatives. The most popular replacement? "[[NatureAbhorsAVirgin The girl who's not been kissed]]" and "[[RoaringTwenties the Prohibitionist]], although more recently, lady novelists have come back into range, either "[[{{Franchise/Twilight}} the vampire novelist]]" or "[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey the fetish novelist]]", under the belief that Sir William would find the abilities of both rather lacking.

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* EvolvingMusic: It's somewhat traditional for certain songs to be updated to poke fun of current topical references. Ko-Ko's "[[ListSong I've Got a Little List]]" from ''TheMikado'' and "The MajorGeneralSong" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' are particularly vulnerable. Gilbert himself sanctioned some of this when he realized that "the lady novelist" on Ko-Ko's list wouldn't always be seen as "[[MostWritersAreMale a singular anomaly]]" and let singers suggest their own alternatives. The lyrics explicitly give permission to fill out the list as they wish.[[note]]The task of filling up the blanks, I'd rather leave to you. But it really doesn't matter whom you put upon the list, for they'd none of 'em be missed -- they'd none of 'em be missed.[[/note]] The most popular replacement? "[[NatureAbhorsAVirgin The girl who's not been kissed]]" and "[[RoaringTwenties the Prohibitionist]], although more recently, lady novelists have come back into range, either "[[{{Franchise/Twilight}} the vampire novelist]]" or "[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey the fetish novelist]]", under the belief that Sir William would find the abilities of both rather lacking.
25th Jul '16 8:30:00 PM jormis29
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** When the defendant (accused of breach of promise of marriage) enters the court in ''Trial by Jury'', he sings "Is this the Court of the Exchequer?" and then aside ''Be firm, be firm, my pecker'', as in British slang "pecker" meant "courage". This has been altered in some modern productions to "Of many a man the wrecker"

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** When the defendant (accused of breach of promise of marriage) BreachOfPromiseOfMarriage) enters the court in ''Trial by Jury'', he sings "Is this the Court of the Exchequer?" and then aside ''Be firm, be firm, my pecker'', as in British slang "pecker" meant "courage". This has been altered in some modern productions to "Of many a man the wrecker"
22nd Jun '16 8:12:47 PM Kalmbach
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Added DiffLines:

** Sir Joseph Porter in ''HMS Pinafore'' "snaps his fingers at a foeman's taunts" but later admits that he has no nautical experience whatsoever, and also that he gets seasick.
17th Jun '16 12:02:03 AM PaulA
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* ''Theatre/{{Patience}}, or, Bunthorne's Bride'' (1881) (a parody of the æsthetic movement of which OscarWilde was a high-profile devotee)

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* ''Theatre/{{Patience}}, or, Bunthorne's Bride'' (1881) (a parody of the æsthetic movement of which OscarWilde Creator/OscarWilde was a high-profile devotee)
15th Jan '16 9:47:39 AM Anddrix
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** ''Patience'': Pretty much a MAJOR expansion of ''[[http://diamond.boisestate.edu/gas/bab_ballads/html/rival_curates.html The Rival Curates]]'', though [[PragmaticAdaptation Gilbert knew that, as much as he might want to poke fun of clerics on the stage]], he'd cause [[MoralGuardians every cleric out there -- who were already, many of them, railing against the wicked stage from the pulpit]] -- to think [[ViewersAreMorons they'd been proven right]].

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** ''Patience'': Pretty much a MAJOR expansion of ''[[http://diamond.boisestate.edu/gas/bab_ballads/html/rival_curates.html The Rival Curates]]'', though [[PragmaticAdaptation Gilbert knew that, as much as he might want to poke fun of clerics on the stage]], he'd cause [[MoralGuardians every cleric out there -- who were already, many of them, railing against the wicked stage from the pulpit]] -- to think [[ViewersAreMorons they'd been proven right]].right.
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