History Creator / GilbertAndSullivan

27th May '17 5:36:55 AM eroock
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->"''To end on a happy note, one can always count on Gilbert and Sullivan for a rousing finale, full of words and music and signifying -- nothing.''"
-->--'''Music/TomLehrer'''

to:

->"''To
->''"To
end on a happy note, one can always count on Gilbert and Sullivan for a rousing finale, full of words and music and signifying -- nothing.''"
-->--'''Music/TomLehrer'''
"''
-->-- '''Music/TomLehrer'''
21st May '17 10:55:27 AM nombretomado
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* AntiquatedLinguistics: Granted, Gilbert was writing in the [[VictorianBritain Victorian Era]], which this trope usually parodies. However, much of Gilbert's dialogue and lyrics were designed to sound humorously overblown and antiquated ''even by Victorian standards''. {{Lampshaded}} in the film version of ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'':

to:

* AntiquatedLinguistics: Granted, Gilbert was writing in the [[VictorianBritain [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain Victorian Era]], which this trope usually parodies. However, much of Gilbert's dialogue and lyrics were designed to sound humorously overblown and antiquated ''even by Victorian standards''. {{Lampshaded}} in the film version of ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'':



* PurpleProse: One of Gilbert's favorite targets for satire, since he had plenty of contemporary examples to draw on in VictorianBritain. A particularly purpurescent example can be found in Act 1 of ''Iolanthe'':

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* PurpleProse: One of Gilbert's favorite targets for satire, since he had plenty of contemporary examples to draw on in VictorianBritain.UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain. A particularly purpurescent example can be found in Act 1 of ''Iolanthe'':



* VictorianBritain: Both the historical period of the authors and the frequent target of their satire.
3rd Apr '17 6:07:01 PM nombretomado
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** Also comes up in ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'', where the Pirate King and the Sergeant of Police have their names given in the ''dramatis personae'' as Richard and Edward, respectively. At no point in the opera are these names mentioned. And four of the Major General's daughters have names but only Mabel's is mentioned.

to:

** Also comes up in ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'', ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'', where the Pirate King and the Sergeant of Police have their names given in the ''dramatis personae'' as Richard and Edward, respectively. At no point in the opera are these names mentioned. And four of the Major General's daughters have names but only Mabel's is mentioned.



* AntiquatedLinguistics: Granted, Gilbert was writing in the [[VictorianBritain Victorian Era]], which this trope usually parodies. However, much of Gilbert's dialogue and lyrics were designed to sound humorously overblown and antiquated ''even by Victorian standards''. {{Lampshaded}} in the film version of ThePiratesOfPenzance:

to:

* AntiquatedLinguistics: Granted, Gilbert was writing in the [[VictorianBritain Victorian Era]], which this trope usually parodies. However, much of Gilbert's dialogue and lyrics were designed to sound humorously overblown and antiquated ''even by Victorian standards''. {{Lampshaded}} in the film version of ThePiratesOfPenzance:''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'':



* EvolvingMusic: It's somewhat traditional for certain songs to be updated to poke fun of current topical references. Ko-Ko's "[[ListSong I've Got a Little List]]" from ''TheMikado'' and "The MajorGeneralSong" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' are particularly vulnerable. Gilbert himself sanctioned some of this when he realized that "the lady novelist" on Ko-Ko's list wouldn't always be seen as "[[MostWritersAreMale a singular anomaly]]" and let singers suggest their own alternatives. The lyrics explicitly give permission to fill out the list as they wish.[[note]]The task of filling up the blanks, I'd rather leave to you. But it really doesn't matter whom you put upon the list, for they'd none of 'em be missed -- they'd none of 'em be missed.[[/note]] The most popular replacement? "[[NatureAbhorsAVirgin The girl who's not been kissed]]" and "[[RoaringTwenties the Prohibitionist]], although more recently, lady novelists have come back into range, either "[[{{Franchise/Twilight}} the vampire novelist]]" or "[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey the fetish novelist]]", under the belief that Sir William would find the abilities of both rather lacking.

to:

* EvolvingMusic: It's somewhat traditional for certain songs to be updated to poke fun of current topical references. Ko-Ko's "[[ListSong I've Got a Little List]]" from ''TheMikado'' and "The MajorGeneralSong" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'' are particularly vulnerable. Gilbert himself sanctioned some of this when he realized that "the lady novelist" on Ko-Ko's list wouldn't always be seen as "[[MostWritersAreMale a singular anomaly]]" and let singers suggest their own alternatives. The lyrics explicitly give permission to fill out the list as they wish.[[note]]The task of filling up the blanks, I'd rather leave to you. But it really doesn't matter whom you put upon the list, for they'd none of 'em be missed -- they'd none of 'em be missed.[[/note]] The most popular replacement? "[[NatureAbhorsAVirgin The girl who's not been kissed]]" and "[[RoaringTwenties the Prohibitionist]], although more recently, lady novelists have come back into range, either "[[{{Franchise/Twilight}} the vampire novelist]]" or "[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey the fetish novelist]]", under the belief that Sir William would find the abilities of both rather lacking.



* IAmSong: "I am the very model of a modern Major General." by General Stanley, ''ThePiratesOfPenzance''. And lots and lots more.

to:

* IAmSong: "I am the very model of a modern Major General." by General Stanley, ''ThePiratesOfPenzance''.''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance''. And lots and lots more.



* ListSong: Many, as this is a great way to write a PatterSong. Notable examples include, "If you want a receipt for that popular mystery" from ''Patience'', the MajorGeneralSong from ThePiratesOfPenzance, and of course [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "I've Got a Little List"]] from ''The Mikado.''

to:

* ListSong: Many, as this is a great way to write a PatterSong. Notable examples include, "If you want a receipt for that popular mystery" from ''Patience'', the MajorGeneralSong from ThePiratesOfPenzance, ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'', and of course [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "I've Got a Little List"]] from ''The Mikado.''



* {{Pirates}}: As in, ''[[ThePiratesOfPenzance of Penzance]]''.

to:

* {{Pirates}}: As in, ''[[ThePiratesOfPenzance ''[[Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance of Penzance]]''.



* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: ThePiratesOfPenzance, obviously, but Major General Stanley in the same opera counts as well -- and in ''TheMikado'' Ko-Ko never does his job as executioner, nor do we ever see Pooh Bah performing any of his various capacities. Similarly the Royal Navy in ''HMS Pinafore'' is never engaged in battle. Gilbert actually {{lampshades}} this Trope in ''Theatre/{{Iolanthe}}'', when he has Lord Mountararat proclaim:

to:

* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: ThePiratesOfPenzance, Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance, obviously, but Major General Stanley in the same opera counts as well -- and in ''TheMikado'' Ko-Ko never does his job as executioner, nor do we ever see Pooh Bah performing any of his various capacities. Similarly the Royal Navy in ''HMS Pinafore'' is never engaged in battle. Gilbert actually {{lampshades}} this Trope in ''Theatre/{{Iolanthe}}'', when he has Lord Mountararat proclaim:



* VillainsOutShopping: "When a felon's not engaged in his employment" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance''.

to:

* VillainsOutShopping: "When a felon's not engaged in his employment" from ''ThePiratesOfPenzance''.''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance''.
14th Mar '17 1:36:48 PM capsaicinfinity
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*** Mrs Partlet and the Notary don't get any ShipTease in the libretto. As such, their pairing off for the finale pretty much counts as pairing the only remotely age-appropriate spares.

to:

*** **** Mrs Partlet and the Notary don't get any ShipTease in the libretto. As such, their pairing off for the finale pretty much counts as pairing the only remotely age-appropriate spares.
14th Mar '17 1:34:30 PM capsaicinfinity
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*** Mrs Partlet and the Notary don't get any ShipTease in the libretto- most of their roles are to be comically ill-suited [[RomanticFalseLead Romantic False Leads]] for Sir Marmaduke and Constance respectively. As such, their pairing off for the finale pretty much counts as pairing the only remotely age-appropriate spares.

to:

*** Mrs Partlet and the Notary don't get any ShipTease in the libretto- most of their roles are to be comically ill-suited [[RomanticFalseLead Romantic False Leads]] for Sir Marmaduke and Constance respectively.libretto. As such, their pairing off for the finale pretty much counts as pairing the only remotely age-appropriate spares.
14th Mar '17 1:32:18 PM capsaicinfinity
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Added DiffLines:

**** Mrs Partlet and the Notary don't get any ShipTease in the libretto- most of their roles are to be comically ill-suited [[RomanticFalseLead Romantic False Leads]] for Sir Marmaduke and Constance respectively. As such, their pairing off for the finale pretty much counts as pairing the only remotely age-appropriate spares.
20th Feb '17 2:13:43 AM bt8257
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Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.

to:

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] {{Victorian|London}} duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.
6th Jan '17 6:14:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* HalfHumanHybrid: ''Iolanthe'''s son Strephon, who laments that only half of him is immortal while the other will waste away. ([[FreudWasRight Guess which half isn't]].)

to:

* HalfHumanHybrid: ''Iolanthe'''s son Strephon, who laments that only half of him is immortal while the other will waste away. ([[FreudWasRight Guess which half isn't]].)
4th Dec '16 2:06:59 AM Xtifr
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'''Sir William Schwenck Gilbert''' (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and '''Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan''' (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.

to:

'''Sir Sir William Schwenck Gilbert''' Gilbert (18 November 1836–29 May 1911) and '''Sir Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan''' Sullivan (13 May 1842-22 November 1900) were a [[VictorianLondon Victorian]] duo who together wrote a number of hugely popular and influential comic operas, which served as forerunners of TheMusical (most people today think of them as musicals), Gilbert writing the book and lyrics (what's known as a librettist, because he writes the ''libretto''), and Sullivan the scores. Their most famous works are the so-called Savoy operas (from the Savoy Theatre where their operas were produced by entrepreneur Richard D'Oyly Carte), stretching from ''Trial By Jury'' in 1871 to ''The Gondoliers'' in 1889. The partnership then broke up, partly because of the legendary irascibility of Gilbert, partly because Sullivan ([[ExecutiveMeddling encouraged]] by none other than UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria'''!'''), wished to devote himself to serious music, mostly over a carpet. Two later works, ''Utopia, Ltd.'' and ''The Grand Duke'', came after the reunion of the team; they have not generally been considered successes.
8th Nov '16 7:38:19 PM karstovich2
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The Savoy operas are characterised by the topsy-turvy logic of their plots, which often achieve their ''dénouement'' on the basis of some paradoxical ("Gilbertian") legalistic quibble (Gilbert had trained as a lawyer), as well as by their satire of English institutions. Gilbert's lyrics are masterpieces of complicated and difficult rhymes, often employing obscure and topical allusions, as well as three or four foreign languages; Sullivan's serious and romantic music adds emotional depth and tenderness to their often cynical frivolity.

to:

The Savoy operas were a reaction, in part, to the scandalous operettas popular in mid-19th century Europe, particularly France (as most famously done by Music/JacquesOffenbach). Gilbert and Sullivan wanted to write family-friendly light operas that just as uproariously funny and deliciously satirical as the raunchier productions that preceded them. They succeeded. The Savoy operas are characterised by the topsy-turvy logic of their plots, which often achieve their ''dénouement'' on the basis of some paradoxical ("Gilbertian") legalistic quibble (Gilbert had trained as a lawyer), as well as by their satire of English institutions. Gilbert's lyrics are masterpieces of complicated and difficult rhymes, often employing obscure and topical allusions, as well as three or four foreign languages; Sullivan's serious and romantic music adds emotional depth and tenderness to their often cynical frivolity.
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