History Creator / Filmation

11th Jan '16 12:45:22 PM dsneybuf
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* ''Film/JourneyBackToOz'' (1974)
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* ''Film/JourneyBackToOz'' ''WesternAnimation/JourneyBackToOz'' (1974)
6th Jan '16 8:01:10 PM Tdarcos
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Filmation was owned first by [=TelePrompTer=] and later by Westinghouse (the logo above being rendered in the distinctive [[http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/larabie/anklepants/ "Group W" font]] shared among most Westinghouse broadcasting assets), but was bought by the L'Oreal Corporation in 1987 and promptly shut down, probably for tax purposes. Its last production to be released was the theatrical feature ''WesternAnimation/HappilyEverAfter'', an unofficial sequel to Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (featuring seven "dwarfelles" in place of dwarfs), six years after the studio was killed.[[note]]Their last production to be released while the studio was still in business was ''WesternAnimation/PinocchioAndTheEmperorOfTheNight'' in 1987, a similar attempt by Filmation to ape Disney.[[/note]] Attempts by founder Lou Scheimer to [[IncrediblyLamePun re-animate]] the studio proved unsuccessful; Scheimer died in 2013. The studio's library is currently owned by DreamworksAnimation.
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Filmation was owned first by [=TelePrompTer=] and later by Westinghouse (the logo above being rendered in the distinctive [[http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/larabie/anklepants/ fontspace.com/john-sizemore/westinghouse "Group W" font]] shared among most Westinghouse broadcasting assets), but was bought by the L'Oreal Corporation in 1987 and promptly shut down, probably for tax purposes. Its last production to be released was the theatrical feature ''WesternAnimation/HappilyEverAfter'', an unofficial sequel to Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (featuring seven "dwarfelles" in place of dwarfs), six years after the studio was killed.[[note]]Their last production to be released while the studio was still in business was ''WesternAnimation/PinocchioAndTheEmperorOfTheNight'' in 1987, a similar attempt by Filmation to ape Disney.[[/note]] Attempts by founder Lou Scheimer to [[IncrediblyLamePun re-animate]] the studio proved unsuccessful; Scheimer died in 2013. The studio's library is currently owned by DreamworksAnimation.
4th Sep '15 7:44:28 PM nombretomado
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* DemBones: ''The Groovie Goolies'' featured a skeleton band called "The Bare Bones Band", A skeleton named "[[NapoleonBonaparte Bone-Apart]]",who was dressed in a Napoleonic hat and was constantly falling apart ([[IncrediblyLamePun Groan!]]) and later, "Scared Stiff" on ''Ghostbusters'' was a [[SkeleBot9000 skeletal robot ghost]] (who was ALSO constantly falling apart) -- and, of course, Skeletor, at least from the neck up.
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* DemBones: ''The Groovie Goolies'' featured a skeleton band called "The Bare Bones Band", A skeleton named "[[NapoleonBonaparte "[[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Bone-Apart]]",who was dressed in a Napoleonic hat and was constantly falling apart ([[IncrediblyLamePun Groan!]]) and later, "Scared Stiff" on ''Ghostbusters'' was a [[SkeleBot9000 skeletal robot ghost]] (who was ALSO constantly falling apart) -- and, of course, Skeletor, at least from the neck up.
5th Jul '15 11:55:25 PM HelloLamppost
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* StockSoundEffects: Many of the sound effects in Filmation's cartoons were low-quality copies of the Creator/HannaBarbera sound effects (often with a more audible echo, or at a slightly lower pitch), along with a few custom-created sounds and some stock sounds from Disney's cartoons (by Creator/JimmyMacDonald.) Some sound effects were borrowed from the original ''StarTrek'' series such as the phaser, photon torpedo, and transporter sound effects. ** The distinctive "heat ray" sound from the 1950's ''War of the Worlds'' film also gets used a lot.
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* StockSoundEffects: Many of the sound effects in Filmation's cartoons were low-quality copies of the Creator/HannaBarbera sound effects (often with a more audible echo, or at a slightly lower pitch), along with a few custom-created sounds and some stock sounds from Disney's cartoons (by Creator/JimmyMacDonald.) Some sound effects were borrowed from the original ''StarTrek'' series such as the phaser, photon torpedo, and transporter sound effects. ** effects. The distinctive "heat ray" sound from the 1950's ''War of the Worlds'' film also gets used a lot.
5th Jul '15 11:54:28 PM HelloLamppost
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** The distinctive "heat ray" sound from the 1950's ''War of the Worlds'' film also gets used a lot.
5th Jul '15 7:43:41 AM themisterfree
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* DigitalDestruction: Many 2000s DVD releases of these cartoons have the sound higher pitched. This was because, when they owned the rights to the library in the 90s, Hallmark (the card company) ''deliberately'' threw out the original masters (as well as sound masters and other important archival material) and made new ones- but only for international distribution, apparently because they hated Filmation's library; this was discovered when Entertainment Rights (which has, though various mergers, been absorbed into Creator/DreamworksAnimation) bought it off Hallmark. Hence, the majority of the library is now high-pitched, due to being in PAL format as compared to NTSC. Some of the lucky few to escape this included ''WesternAnimation/FilmationsGhostbusters'' (both the live action and animated versions), several of their little-known live action series like ''Ark II'', and ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'' (the latter being held by Paramount, then CBS), and likely other series held by other companies, like their DC Comics cartoons (distributed by Warner Bros.).
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* DigitalDestruction: Many 2000s DVD releases of these cartoons have the sound higher pitched. This was because, when they owned the rights to the library in the 90s, Hallmark (the card company) ''deliberately'' threw out the original masters (as well as sound masters and other important archival material) and made new ones- but only for international distribution, apparently because they hated Filmation's library; this was discovered when Entertainment Rights (which has, though various mergers, been absorbed into Creator/DreamworksAnimation) bought it off Hallmark. Hence, the majority of the library is now high-pitched, due to being in PAL format as compared to NTSC. Some of the lucky few to escape this included ''WesternAnimation/FilmationsGhostbusters'' ''Ghostbusters'' (both the live action and animated versions), several of their little-known live action series like ''Ark II'', and ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'' ''Star Trek: TAS'' (the latter being held by Paramount, then CBS), and likely other series held by other companies, like their DC Comics cartoons (distributed by Warner Bros.).
5th Jul '15 7:43:07 AM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:
* DigitalDestruction: Many 2000s DVD releases of these cartoons have the sound higher pitched. This was because, when they owned the rights to the library in the 90s, Hallmark (the card company) ''deliberately'' threw out the original masters (as well as sound masters and other important archival material) and made new ones- but only for international distribution, apparently because they hated Filmation's library; this was discovered when Entertainment Rights (which has, though various mergers, been absorbed into Creator/DreamworksAnimation) bought it off Hallmark. Hence, the majority of the library is now high-pitched, due to being in PAL format as compared to NTSC. Some of the lucky few to escape this included ''WesternAnimation/FilmationsGhostbusters'' (both the live action and animated versions), several of their little-known live action series like ''Ark II'', and ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'' (the latter being held by Paramount, then CBS), and likely other series held by other companies, like their DC Comics cartoons (distributed by Warner Bros.).
1st Jul '15 7:26:12 AM speedyboris
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* DomesticOnlyCartoon: Nearly all of them, with the exception of ''Zorro''.
18th Jun '15 9:02:21 AM CorahsUncle
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"Dollars" is redundant when the dollar sign is used
The studio was run on a shoestring budget, so they had to limit costs wherever possible. This condition was aggravated by Filmation's "people before art" policies which forbade the company from outsourcing jobs to cheaper foreign animation studios.[[note]]Although they did work with Creator/{{TMS|Entertainment}} on Zorro. However, Zorro was even cheaper to produce than TMS's own domestic productions, and TMS paid their staff members more than Filmation did—to put ''that'' in perspective, a typical episode of an American cartoon usually has around 3 times ($300,000 dollars) the budget of a typical episode of an anime ($123,000 dollars)—showing just how cheap Filmation was. The only thing saving the American studio was the favourable yen-to-dollar exchange rate at the time; once that changed, they decided to just do the rest of their shows themselves.[[/note]] This resulted in Filmation's (in)famous cost-cutting techniques: LimitedAnimation and considerable reliance on [[StockFootage re-used footage]].
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The studio was run on a shoestring budget, so they had to limit costs wherever possible. This condition was aggravated by Filmation's "people before art" policies which forbade the company from outsourcing jobs to cheaper foreign animation studios.[[note]]Although they did work with Creator/{{TMS|Entertainment}} on Zorro. ''Zorro''. However, Zorro ''Zorro'' was even cheaper to produce than TMS's own domestic productions, and TMS paid their staff members more than Filmation did—to put ''that'' in perspective, a typical episode of an American cartoon usually has around 3 times ($300,000 dollars) ($300,000) the budget of a typical episode of an anime ($123,000 dollars)—showing ($123,000)—showing just how cheap Filmation was. The only thing saving the American studio was the favourable yen-to-dollar exchange rate at the time; once that changed, they decided to just do the rest of their shows themselves.[[/note]] This resulted in Filmation's (in)famous cost-cutting techniques: LimitedAnimation and considerable reliance on [[StockFootage re-used footage]].

The studio's first success came in 1966 with ''TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman''; this was soon eclipsed by the runaway popularity of ''WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow'' in 1968. ''Archie'' spun off Filmation's next hit, ''WesternAnimation/SabrinaAndTheGroovieGoolies'', in 1971. In 1972 a bizarre {{crossover}} film was made for ''The ABC Saturday Superstar Movies'' featuring the Groovie Goolies meeting various WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes characters. The studio's first foray into socially conscious cartooning came in 1972 with ''WesternAnimation/FatAlbertAndTheCosbyKids''; thereafter, didacticism would be common not only on cartoons like ''WesternAnimation/MissionMagic'' (a precursor to ''Literature/TheMagicSchoolBus'' in featuring a supernaturally endowed teacher, [[IncrediblyLamePun Miss Tickle]], along with later 1980s pop idol Rick Springfield), but in Filmation's live-action productions as well, such as the environmentally educational ''Ark II'', ''Shazam!'' and ''Isis'' (which featured another magical, HotLibrarian-ish teacher, who transformed into the Egyptian goddess [[[ByThePowerOfGrayskull "O mighty Isis!"]]] in order to fly around in skimpy skirts and demonstrate social lessons into the bargain). Throughout the 1970s, Filmation produced some well-regarded {{animated adaptation}}s of various series, such as ''[[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon The New Adventures of Flash Gordon]]''; ''{{Tarzan}}, Lord of the Jungle''; ''Franchise/{{Zorro}};'' ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'', and ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'', as well as some less well-regarded ones, such as ''TheBradyKids'' (whose dancing pandas and helicopter-tailed wizard bird are [[ShoutOut deployed]] to hilarious effect in a MushroomSamba sequence in ''[[Series/TheBradyBunch A Very Brady Sequel]]''), ''[[Series/GilligansIsland The New Adventures of Gilligan]]'', ''My Favorite Martians'', and ''WesternAnimation/UncleCrocsBlock'', which featured an all-canine version of ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' called "M*U*S*H".
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The studio's first success came in 1966 with ''TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman''; ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman''; this was soon eclipsed by the runaway popularity of ''WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow'' in 1968. ''Archie'' spun off Filmation's next hit, ''WesternAnimation/SabrinaAndTheGroovieGoolies'', in 1971. In 1972 a bizarre {{crossover}} film was made for ''The ABC Saturday Superstar Movies'' featuring the Groovie Goolies meeting various WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes characters. The studio's first foray into socially conscious cartooning came in 1972 with ''WesternAnimation/FatAlbertAndTheCosbyKids''; thereafter, didacticism would be common not only on cartoons like ''WesternAnimation/MissionMagic'' (a precursor to ''Literature/TheMagicSchoolBus'' in featuring a supernaturally endowed teacher, [[IncrediblyLamePun [[PunnyName Miss Tickle]], along with later 1980s pop idol Rick Springfield), but in Filmation's live-action productions as well, such as the environmentally educational ''Ark II'', ''Shazam!'' and ''Isis'' (which featured another magical, HotLibrarian-ish teacher, who transformed into the Egyptian goddess [[[ByThePowerOfGrayskull "O mighty Isis!"]]] in order to fly around in a skimpy skirts skirt and demonstrate social lessons into the bargain). Throughout the 1970s, Filmation produced some well-regarded {{animated adaptation}}s of various series, such as ''[[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon The New Adventures of Flash Gordon]]''; ''{{Tarzan}}, ''Franchise/{{Tarzan}}, Lord of the Jungle''; ''Franchise/{{Zorro}};'' ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'', and ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'', as well as some less well-regarded ones, such as ''TheBradyKids'' ''WesternAnimation/TheBradyKids'' (whose dancing pandas and helicopter-tailed wizard bird are [[ShoutOut deployed]] to hilarious effect in a MushroomSamba sequence in ''[[Series/TheBradyBunch A Very Brady Sequel]]''), ''[[Series/GilligansIsland The New Adventures of Gilligan]]'', ''My Favorite Martians'', and ''WesternAnimation/UncleCrocsBlock'', which featured an all-canine version of ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' called "M*U*S*H".

Filmation owned the rights to a 1975 live-action series called ''The Ghost Busters'' starring ''FTroop'' co-stars Forrest Tucker and Larry Storch (one of Filmation's favorite voice actors), and a [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys guy in a gorilla suit]]. ColumbiaPictures had to apply for the rights to call its 1984 movie ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}},'' and after its success, Filmation revived the series in animated format, now called simply ''[[WesternAnimation/FilmationsGhostbusters Ghostbusters]],'' The SpinOff animated show from the movie thus became ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters,'' while Filmation's version was for a while named ''The Original Ghostbusters.''
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Filmation owned the rights to a 1975 live-action series called ''The Ghost Busters'' starring ''FTroop'' ''Series/FTroop'' co-stars Forrest Tucker and Larry Storch (one of Filmation's favorite voice actors), and a [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys guy in a gorilla suit]]. ColumbiaPictures had to apply for the rights to call its 1984 movie ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}},'' and after its success, Filmation revived the series in animated format, now called simply ''[[WesternAnimation/FilmationsGhostbusters Ghostbusters]],'' Ghostbusters]]''. The SpinOff animated show from the movie thus became ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters,'' while Filmation's version was for a while named ''The Original Ghostbusters.''

* ''TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'' (1966) * ''The Franchise/{{Superman}}/Aquaman Hour of Adventure'' (1967)
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* ''TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'' ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'' (1966) * ''The Franchise/{{Superman}}/Aquaman Franchise/{{Superman}}[=/=]Aquaman Hour of Adventure'' (1967)

* ''TheArchieShow'' (1968)
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* ''TheArchieShow'' ''WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow'' (1968)

* ''Will The Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down'' (1970)
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* ''Will The the Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down'' (1970)

* ''ArchiesTVFunnies'' (1971)
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* ''ArchiesTVFunnies'' ''WesternAnimation/ArchiesTVFunnies'' (1971)

* ''TheBradyKids'' (1972)
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* ''TheBradyKids'' ''WesternAnimation/TheBradyKids'' (1972)

* ''The Secret Lives Of Waldo Kitty'' (1975; inspired by TheSecretLifeOfWalterMitty)
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* ''The Secret Lives Of of Waldo Kitty'' (1975; inspired by TheSecretLifeOfWalterMitty)''Literature/TheSecretLifeOfWalterMitty'')

* ''{{Tarzan}}, Lord of the Jungle'' (1976)
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* ''{{Tarzan}}, ''Franchise/{{Tarzan}}, Lord of the Jungle'' (1976)

* ''TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'' (1977)
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* ''TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'' ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'' (1977)

* ''SpaceSentinels'' (1977)
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* ''SpaceSentinels'' ''WesternAnimation/SpaceSentinels'' (1977)

* ''Series/JasonOfStarCommand'' (1979; a spinoff of Space Academy)
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* ''Series/JasonOfStarCommand'' (1979; a spinoff of Space Academy)''Space Academy'')

* ''SportBilly'' (1979-1980)
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* ''SportBilly'' ''WesternAnimation/SportBilly'' (1979-1980)

* ''{{Blackstar}}'' (1981) * ''HeroHigh'' (1981)
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* ''{{Blackstar}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Blackstar}}'' (1981) * ''HeroHigh'' ''WesternAnimation/HeroHigh'' (1981)

* ''The {{Tarzan}}[=/=]LoneRanger[=/=]Franchise/{{Zorro}} Adventure Hour'' (1981) * ''Gilligan's Planet'' (1982; Filmation's final series for Saturday Mornings; also the first to use the Lou Scheimer "signature" credit)
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* ''The {{Tarzan}}[=/=]LoneRanger[=/=]Franchise/{{Zorro}} Franchise/{{Tarzan}}[=/=]Franchise/LoneRanger[=/=]Franchise/{{Zorro}} Adventure Hour'' (1981) * ''Gilligan's Planet'' (1982; Filmation's final series for Saturday Mornings; mornings; also the first to use the Lou Scheimer "signature" credit)

* ActionGirl: Isis; Teela on ''He-Man''; Judge J.B. Mac Bride on ''Bravestarr''; She-Ra and her companions on her eponymous show.
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* ActionGirl: Isis; Teela on ''He-Man''; Judge J.B. Mac Bride [=MacBride=] on ''Bravestarr''; She-Ra and her companions on her eponymous show.

* AudibleGleam: This was a recurring sound effect in many of {{Creator/Filmation}}'s productions. In fact, it's even featured in the first version of the company's Westinghouse-era (post-1983) logo.
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* AudibleGleam: This was a recurring sound effect in many of {{Creator/Filmation}}'s Filmation's productions. In fact, it's even featured in the first version of the company's Westinghouse-era (post-1983) logo.

* NotQuiteStarring: The entire basis for ''Will the Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down?'' * OpeningNarration: Filmation liked Opening Narrations (or occasionally [[ExpositoryThemeTune Expository Theme Tunes)]] and used them in a lot of their shows (''He-Man,'' ''Flash Gordon,'' ''Fat Albert,'' ''Zorro,'' and many others). Of course, a few like ''Star Trek'' and ''The Lone Ranger'' had Opening Narrations carried over from their live action versions.
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* NotQuiteStarring: The entire basis for ''Will the Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down?'' Down''. * OpeningNarration: Filmation liked Opening Narrations (or occasionally [[ExpositoryThemeTune Expository Theme Tunes)]] {{expository theme tune}}s) and used them in a lot of their shows (''He-Man,'' ''Flash Gordon,'' ''Fat Albert,'' ''Zorro,'' and many others). Of course, a few like ''Star Trek'' and ''The Lone Ranger'' had Opening Narrations carried over from their live action versions.

* OurMonstersAreDifferent: The Groovie Goolies were a fairly early example of the friendly, funny variation of the classic {{Universal}} movie monsters.
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* OurMonstersAreDifferent: The Groovie Goolies were a fairly early example of the friendly, funny variation of the classic {{Universal}} Creator/{{Universal}} movie monsters.
18th Jun '15 8:51:22 AM mr3urious
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Added DiffLines:
* DescendedCreator: Lou Scheimer would voice many of the characters in his shows due to budget reasons.
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