History Creator / Euripides

10th Sep '17 5:59:28 AM Mr.Phorcys
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** Alcemene (Heracles's mother) finally gets revenge on King Eurystheus, who had tormented her entire family, in ''Heracleidae''. She spends the entire scene talking about how he deserves to be killed, despite it being against the law of Athens, the city she was in at the time, to kill a defenseless prisoner.
1st Jul '17 9:07:05 AM nombretomado
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** ''The Trojan Women'' plays up the tragedies which befall the people of Troy after their city fell rather than focusing on the heroics of the main characters. And this isn't the only example--TheOtherWiki has noted that Euripides's plays tended to use and adjust old myths and lore to explore the quandaries of contemporary Athenian culture. Which, of course, ''used'' those old myths' baseline forms to define and justify its culture.

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** ''The Trojan Women'' plays up the tragedies which befall the people of Troy after their city fell rather than focusing on the heroics of the main characters. And this isn't the only example--TheOtherWiki example--Wiki/TheOtherWiki has noted that Euripides's plays tended to use and adjust old myths and lore to explore the quandaries of contemporary Athenian culture. Which, of course, ''used'' those old myths' baseline forms to define and justify its culture.
4th Mar '17 11:19:07 PM JulianLapostat
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* OutlivingOnesOffspring: The bitter fate of Hecuba, and the cause of her woes, and that of Andromache.
4th Mar '17 11:17:23 PM JulianLapostat
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** Some of his plays are either UnbuiltTrope to the structure of drama defined in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}'' much to Creator/{{Aristotle}}'s displeasure. Aristotle argued that tragedy ought to have purpose, a defined beginning-middle-end and must provide catharsis. Euripides' plays often deal with characters confront senseless and absurd fates, where many of them lament the suffering visited on them, little of which seems to have any meaning.

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** Some of his plays are either UnbuiltTrope to the structure of drama defined in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}'' much to Creator/{{Aristotle}}'s displeasure.or a TakeThat. Aristotle argued that tragedy ought to have purpose, a defined beginning-middle-end and must provide catharsis. Euripides' plays often deal with characters confront senseless and absurd fates, where many of them lament the suffering visited on them, little of which seems to have any meaning.
4th Mar '17 11:16:37 PM JulianLapostat
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Any discussion of Euripides has to make note of the fact that he had a LoveItOrHateIt reputation during his day. Euripides was well aware of the constraints placed upon playwrights at the time, and many of his plays attempted to subvert at least one of the established theatrical conventions. Today, however, some scholars regard him as the best of the three surviving Greek playwrights and several regard him as the Shakespeare of Athens.

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Any discussion of Euripides has to make note of the fact that he had a LoveItOrHateIt reputation during his day. Euripides was well aware of the constraints placed upon playwrights at the time, and many of his plays attempted to subvert at least one of the established theatrical conventions. Today, however, Breaking conventions made him divisive among both public and the critics. In general, he had a better popular than a critical reputation. He was parodied in Creator/{{Aristophanes}}' ''Theatre/TheFrogs'' where he was compared unfavorably to Creator/{{Aeschylus}}. Nonetheless, today, some scholars regard him as the best best, and certainly the most modern, of the three surviving Greek playwrights and several regard him as the Shakespeare of Athens.



* ''Heracleidae''

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* ''Heracleidae''''Heracleidae''ien



* AuthorTract: ''Iphigenia in Tauris'', against HumanSacrifice..

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* AuthorTract: ''Iphigenia at Aulis'' and ''Iphigenia in Tauris'', against HumanSacrifice..HumanSacrifice.
* BlueAndOrangeMorality: A lot of his plays deal with the fact that the Gods are entirely alien to human suffering, human concern and human morality -- ''Heracles'' and ''Iphigenia at Aulis'' especially.



* {{Deconstruction}}: ''The Trojan Women'' plays up the tragedies which befall the people of Troy after their city fell rather than focusing on the heroics of the main characters. And this isn't the only example--TheOtherWiki has noted that Euripides's plays tended to use and adjust old myths and lore to explore the quandaries of contemporary Athenian culture. Which, of course, ''used'' those old myths' baseline forms to define and justify its culture.

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* {{Deconstruction}}: {{Deconstruction}}:
**
''The Trojan Women'' plays up the tragedies which befall the people of Troy after their city fell rather than focusing on the heroics of the main characters. And this isn't the only example--TheOtherWiki has noted that Euripides's plays tended to use and adjust old myths and lore to explore the quandaries of contemporary Athenian culture. Which, of course, ''used'' those old myths' baseline forms to define and justify its culture.culture.
** Some of his plays are either UnbuiltTrope to the structure of drama defined in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}'' much to Creator/{{Aristotle}}'s displeasure. Aristotle argued that tragedy ought to have purpose, a defined beginning-middle-end and must provide catharsis. Euripides' plays often deal with characters confront senseless and absurd fates, where many of them lament the suffering visited on them, little of which seems to have any meaning.
--> '''Clytemnestra''': ''I cannot think where/to start my bitter story,/for its beginning is grief,/its middle is grief/its end/is grief.'' (Iphigenia at Aulis, translated by W. S. Merwin and George Dimock).



** As many later theater directors and audiences noted, the DeusExMachina often doesn't really resolve the drama. In ''Iphigenia at Aulis'', Iphigenia agreed to submit to HumanSacrifice, Agamemnon carried it out and Clytemnestra drowns in grief. The fact that the Goddess Artemis replaced Iphigenia with a deer at the last moment doesn't change the fact that Iphigenia will never really see her mother and father again, nor will it change the end of the marriage between her parents.
** Likewise, in ''Medea'', the fact is Medea killed her children, Jason is too late to save it, and he and others have to live with Medea becoming a KarmaHoudini and the grief of the tragedy.



* MortonsFork: How Agamemmnon feels about his lot in ''Iphigenia at Aulis''. To get swift winds to sail to Troy, he must sacrifice Iphigenia even if he doesn't want to. If he decides to back away, having gathered his army who are composed of GlorySeeker and thirsty for pay or adventure, he cannot back away from sacrificing Iphigenia, otherwise he will face TheMutiny from soldiers who will in turn decide to sack Argos, attack him, murder his family, rape, enslave or kill Iphigenia, anyway. Achilles later in the play confirms Agammenon's fears when he tries to reason with other soldiers not to accept it, and they (including his Myrmidons) get agitated and insist that Iphigenia be sacrificed.



* PatrioticFervor: In ''Iphigenia at Aulis'', the protagonist comes around to accepting her role as a victim of HumanSacrifice when she realizes that with it Greece would triumph over the Trojans and the Greeks would rule over the barbarians. Given the context of Euripides time and the centuries before (i.e. memories of Persian invasion, hegemony over the Delian league, war with Sparta) it's possibly either played straight (i.e. an attempt to make a victim into a TragicHero), [[StealthParody or its satirical of patriotism by which the most absurd and insane actions can be rationalized and even glorified]].



* RapePillageAndBurn: ''Trojan Women''

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* RapePillageAndBurn: ''Trojan Women''Women'' and more or less a concern in many of his plays. In ''Heracles'', the hero's wife Megara was subject to much taunts about rape from the Theban army before Heracles arrived, and in ''Iphigenia at Aulis'', the Chorus, Achilles and the slave often comment about Clytemnestra and Iphigenia among soldiers.



* {{Tragedy}}



* VirginSacrifice



* WickedStepmother

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* WickedStepmother
4th Mar '17 12:14:30 PM JM1982
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* EarnYourHappyEnding: Orestes is put through hell and back, but he eventually finds peace and happiness.



* SparedByTheAdaptation: According to contemporary sources, Antigone and Haemon in the now-MissingEpisode ''Antigone''. Fragments of ''Phaëton'' suggest the title character of that one was, too.

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* SparedByTheAdaptation: According to contemporary sources, Antigone and Haemon in the now-MissingEpisode ''Antigone''. Fragments of ''Phaëton'' suggest the title character of that one was, too. Euripides' plays about Iphigenia reveal that she was not actually sacrificed to Artemis. Instead, Artemis took Iphigenia to Tauris, where she served Artemis as a priestess.
19th Feb '17 8:22:06 PM JulianLapostat
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* PaterFamilicide: The drama of Heracles deals with the situation that led to the protagonist killing his wife and children.
25th Oct '16 9:25:39 PM shatterstar
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* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned with the most often cited reason is the lack of woman in a major role character[[/note]]

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* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned with the most often cited reason is the lack of woman in a major role character[[/note]]role[[/note]]
25th Oct '16 9:24:55 PM shatterstar
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His works are noted for having subtler and more realistic characterization than his predecessors, having women as major characters with the complexity and subtlety far superior than his predecessors and fellow writers[[note]]To the point there is a saying that if the work doesn't have a major character, it can't be from Euripides.[[/note]] and for playing with the established tropes of Greek tragedy. On the other hand, Creator/FriedrichNietzsche condemns Euripides for being in thrall to Creator/{{Socrates}}' philosophy, saying that Euripides "killed" tragedy by infusing it with reason and philosophical ideas.

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His works are noted for having subtler and more realistic characterization than his predecessors, having women as major characters with the complexity and subtlety far superior than his predecessors and fellow writers[[note]]To the point there is a saying that if the work doesn't have a major female character, it can't be from Euripides.[[/note]] and for playing with the established tropes of Greek tragedy. On the other hand, Creator/FriedrichNietzsche condemns Euripides for being in thrall to Creator/{{Socrates}}' philosophy, saying that Euripides "killed" tragedy by infusing it with reason and philosophical ideas.



* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned with the most often cited reason is the lack of a major female character[[/note]]

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* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned with the most often cited reason is the lack of woman in a major female role character[[/note]]
25th Oct '16 9:23:32 PM shatterstar
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His works are noted for having subtler and more realistic characterization than his predecessors, and for playing with the established tropes of Greek tragedy. On the other hand, Creator/FriedrichNietzsche condemns Euripides for being in thrall to Creator/{{Socrates}}' philosophy, saying that Euripides "killed" tragedy by infusing it with reason and philosophical ideas.

to:

His works are noted for having subtler and more realistic characterization than his predecessors, having women as major characters with the complexity and subtlety far superior than his predecessors and fellow writers[[note]]To the point there is a saying that if the work doesn't have a major character, it can't be from Euripides.[[/note]] and for playing with the established tropes of Greek tragedy. On the other hand, Creator/FriedrichNietzsche condemns Euripides for being in thrall to Creator/{{Socrates}}' philosophy, saying that Euripides "killed" tragedy by infusing it with reason and philosophical ideas.



* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned[[/note]]

to:

* ''Rhesus''[[note]]Though the authorship is questioned[[/note]]questioned with the most often cited reason is the lack of a major female character[[/note]]
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