History Creator / EdgarAllanPoe

13th Jan '18 7:24:46 PM Discord_and_Dine
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* TheCakeIsALie: "Eldorado". A knight spends his whole life searching for the mystical golden city, only to meet [[TheGrimReaper Death]] when he's an old man, who tells him that Eldorado is located in the land of the dead; so he must die to reach it, and by that point he won't be able to reap any rewards.
3rd Jan '18 12:21:27 PM LordGro
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* StalkerWithoutACrush: In "The Man in the Crowd" (1840), the narrator, sitting in a London coffee shop and observing the people rushing by, is intrigued by a lone old man who wears ragged but formerly expensive clothes. Taken with the idea that there is some peculiar, possible terrible secret about the man, the narrator decides to follow the stranger in order to learn about him. After shadowing the man a whole night and part of the next day, without the man ever noticing he is being stalked, the narrator ends his chase after having realized (his only definite insight) that the man is persistently avoiding to be alone.
11th Dec '17 6:01:16 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** Also in "The Premature Burial". [[spoiler:Subverted when it turns out that the narrator hasn't actually been buried -- but the scare he got was real.]]
27th Nov '17 4:28:36 PM ZSF
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* RiddleForTheAges: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_allan_poe#Death Poe's own death]], fittingly enough.

to:

* RiddleForTheAges: [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_allan_poe#Death org/wiki/Death_of_Edgar_Allan_Poe Poe's own death]], fittingly enough.
3rd Nov '17 7:37:10 AM nero666
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* BigNameFan: He was a great admirer of Nathaniel Hawthorne, saying that despite his own reputation, he couldn't come close to the level of darkness present in Hawthorne's stories.
18th Oct '17 3:45:24 PM Shishkahuben
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* {{Asexuality}}: He had a wife, Virginia, but he loved her only platonically.

to:

* {{Asexuality}}: He had a wife, Virginia, but he supposedly loved her only platonically.



** Actually, the "platonic lovers" thing is up for debate.
18th Jun '17 8:50:03 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** "A Predicament" takes a very Poe-esque horror set-up (a woman explores a church tower, sticks her head out through an opening in the clock face, and finds that her head gets stuck as the minute hand comes around and starts slicing through her neck) and tells it with massive amounts of StylisticSuck and [[UndeadAuthor the victim narrating her own death]].
18th Jun '17 8:43:25 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** Fortunato in "The Cask of Amontillado", though strictly speaking he is walled up rather than buried.


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* KarmaHoudini: In "The Cask of Amontillado", Montresor apparently never gets found out for murdering Fortunato.
** Subverted in "The Imp of the Perverse": the narrator ran absolutely no risk of being exposed as a murderer [[spoiler:unless he himself confessed. And once he realised that, he was doomed.]]
6th Jun '17 8:19:37 PM g3m1n1
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*TheDogBitesBack: In "Hop-Frog", the eponymous jester repays the abuse heaped upon himself and Trippetta by tricking the king and his advisors into letting him turn them into a chandelier. [[KillItWithFire And then lighting it.]]
2nd Jun '17 9:26:12 AM Ingonyama
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** "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" is written in a style which deliberately apes that of sensationalist stories of the time which were nevertheless purported to be true, and such was the realism of the "scientific" details that, when coupled with the fact that its initial publication occurred in a newspaper (not a literary journal) and without an author identified caused countless people to believe it was a true story. (It helps that the main conceit of the story, exploring the limits and possibilities of mesmerism, was something which was very much in vogue at the time it was written.) Eventually, after a fair amount of time during which Poe very much enjoyed {{Troll}}ing the public, and several reputable people claimed the case (or one they knew of similar to it) had actually happened, he finally admitted that it was a piece of fiction.


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* BodyHorror: Poe's works aren't normally known for this, other than the disturbing teeth removal in "Berenice"--which is why the exception at the climax of "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" is so very memorable, hair-raising, and macabre. There's a reason three different authors of the time described it as his most shocking, disgusting, and gruesome tale.
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