History Creator / EdgarAllanPoe

13th Jun '16 9:22:02 PM PaulA
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* The WindowsOfTheSoul: "The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether".
-->'' "Keeping these impressions in view, I was cautious in what I said''
-->''before the young lady; for I could not be sure that she was sane;''
-->''and, in fact, there was a certain restless brilliancy about her eyes''
-->''which half led me to imagine she was not. "''


Added DiffLines:

* WindowsOfTheSoul: "The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether".
-->''"Keeping these impressions in view, I was cautious in what I said before the young lady; for I could not be sure that she was sane; and, in fact, there was a certain restless brilliancy about her eyes which half led me to imagine she was not."''
13th Jun '16 1:15:26 AM PaulA
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* Literature/CAugusteDupin stories



* DetectiveLiterature: Poe is considered the inventor of the genre through his "tales of ratiocination" featuring the French detective Auguste Dupin ("The Mystery of Marie Roget", "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", and "The Purloined Letter").



* EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys: Subverted in "Murders in the Rue Morgue".



* GentlemanDetective: Dupin, considered the TropeMaker.



* GreatDetective: C. Auguste Dupin.



* HiddenInPlainSight: "The Purloined Letter".



* InnerMonologueConversation: Dupin is famously capable of responding to his companion's inner monologue, by deducing from body language what he must have been thinking about.
* InspiredBy: The murder of Marie Roget, a Dupin mystery.
** Also, his unfinished play ''Politian'' was a fictionalization of a famous duel case of the time.

to:

* InnerMonologueConversation: Dupin is famously capable of responding to his companion's inner monologue, by deducing from body language what he must have been thinking about.
* InspiredBy: The murder of Marie Roget, a Dupin mystery.
** Also, his
His unfinished play ''Politian'' was a fictionalization of a famous duel case of the time.



* LockedRoomMystery: ''The Murders in the Rue Morgue''



* LukeIAmYourFather: Certain critics think D, in "The Purloined Letter," is Dupin's father. Others think the two men may be brothers, as indicated by the reference Dupin makes to the ancient Greek twins Atreus and Thyestes. Still others say certain critics are completely nuts.
** Played for laughs in the comedy story (yes, really) "The Spectacles," where the [[BlindWithoutEm extremely near-sighted]] narrator falls in love with a beautiful woman who turns out to be his great-great-grandmother.

to:

* LukeIAmYourFather: Certain critics think D, in "The Purloined Letter," is Dupin's father. Others think the two men may be brothers, as indicated by the reference Dupin makes to the ancient Greek twins Atreus and Thyestes. Still others say certain critics are completely nuts.
**
Played for laughs in the comedy story (yes, really) "The Spectacles," where the [[BlindWithoutEm extremely near-sighted]] narrator falls in love with a beautiful woman who turns out to be his great-great-grandmother.



* NoNameGiven: Dupin's {{sidekick}}.
** This is actually quite frequent in Poe. It's generally an omission as a result of first-person narration, with the exception of the protagonist of "William Wilson," who refuses to give his name because he's piled too much infamy upon it.

to:

* NoNameGiven: Dupin's {{sidekick}}.
**
This is actually quite frequent in Poe. It's generally an omission as a result of first-person narration, with the exception of the protagonist of "William Wilson," who refuses to give his name because he's piled too much infamy upon it.



* {{Profiling}}: How Dupin figures out that the thief of "The Purloined Letter" hid the letter in plain sight on a letter rack, and how he figures out that the killer in "The Murders in the Rue-Morgue" is an orangutan.



* ShaggyDogStory: Although Dupin solves the case of "The Murder of Marie Roget," the audience isn't informed of more than Dupin's complex reasoning. This is partly because the story is inspired by real events, which themselves were never solved.
* SherlockScan: Helped establish this trope [[OlderThanTheyThink pre-Sherlock]] with his C. Auguste Dupin stories.
* {{Sidekick}}: The narrator of Dupin's stories.



* TheSummation: "The Purloined Letter"



* WikiWalk: In "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," C. Auguste Dupin shows off his general awesomeness by tracking the narrator's train of thought through fifteen minutes of silent walking and several mental topic shifts, and saying exactly the right thing at the end.
13th Jun '16 1:00:39 AM PaulA
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!!Edgar Allen Poe's works provide examples of:

to:

!!Edgar Allen Poe's other works provide examples of:



* AlcoholInducedIdiocy: Fortunado in ''The Cask of Amontillado'' suspects nothing of Montressor largely because he is drunk.
* AluminumChristmasTrees: "Really? [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amontillado There's a wine named Amontillado?]] Wow, I bet they named it after the guy in that Poe story!"



* AristocratsAreEvil: "The Cask of Amontillado" and "Hop-Frog" among others.

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* AristocratsAreEvil: "The Cask of Amontillado" and "Hop-Frog" among others.



** Subverted with regards to the victim in "The Tell-Tale Heart": even the narrator knows the old man to be kind and generous... it's just that ''damned eye'' of his...



* BeatStillMyHeart: [[Literature/TheTellTaleHeart "The Tell-Tale Heart"]] -- probably the most famous example.



* BewareTheNiceOnes:
** Long-suffering dwarf Hop-Frog [[TheDogBitesBack finally snaps]] when the king dares to strike his beloved. His subsequent revenge is not pretty.
** Montressor of "The Cask of Amontillado" claims that he patiently bore a "thousand injuries" from Fortunato until Fortunato finally went too far. Of course Montressor may not be the most reliable narrator.

to:

* BewareTheNiceOnes:
**
BewareTheNiceOnes: Long-suffering dwarf Hop-Frog [[TheDogBitesBack finally snaps]] when the king dares to strike his beloved. His subsequent revenge is not pretty.
** Montressor of "The Cask of Amontillado" claims that he patiently bore a "thousand injuries" from Fortunato until Fortunato finally went too far. Of course Montressor may not be the most reliable narrator.
pretty.



** Fortunato in "The Cask of Amontillado" although technically he was already dead by the time Montressor was done "burying" him.



** Due to the narrator's deranged mind, the old man of "The Tell-Tale Heart"



* CreepyCrows: The narrator of "Literature/TheRaven" at midnight gets a visit from a talking raven that only ever speaks the word "nevermore".



* DesignatedHero/[[DesignatedVillain Villain]]: Intentionally invoked in "The Cask of Amontillado," the designations are made by a very UnreliableNarrator. Montressor repeatedly muses on Fortunado's OffscreenVillainy, but never gets into the specifics of what he actually did, and the guy appears to be harmlessly affable (but then so does Montressor if you don't have access to his thoughts). Meanwhile our narrator, who goes out of his way to assure the reader he is MostDefinitelyNotAVillain, is the one very carefully planning murder. Not even a quick and clean death either, but a pretty nasty AndIMustScream scenario.



* DisproportionateRetribution: Possibly, in "The Cask of Amontillado". Fortunato gets BuriedAlive for insulting the narrator.



** Fortunato, in "The Cask of Amontillado," is already drunk at Carnivale before he is lured to his doom by the prospect of taste-testing a cask of valuable wine. As he and Montressor walk deeper into the catacombs (used doubly as a wine-cellar), Fortunato is given more and more to drink, slowing his reactions to the revenge awaiting him.



* EyeScream: "The Black Cat" and, in some interpretations, "The Tell-Tale Heart".

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* EyeScream: "The Black Cat" and, in some interpretations, "The Tell-Tale Heart".Cat".



* IronicName: "Fortunato" is a very ironic name for the guy who gets buried alive...



* KarmaHoudini: The narrator of "The Cask of Amontillado"



* TheLostLenore: The TropeNamer, courtesy of "The Raven." A love interest of a main character in a story is dead before the story begins, or dies during its course, and their death has significant ongoing impact, consequences, and relevance for the remainder of the story.



* MysteriousAntarctica: ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket''. Also a LostWorld.
** This inspired a ''lot'' of the later uses of this trope, particularly by Creator/JulesVerne and Creator/HPLovecraft.



* NoodleIncident: Readers rarely get to learn ''why'' the narrator - especially the one in "Cask of Amontillado" - is pursuing a cold and cruel revenge against his nemesis/victim. There was some slight made back well before the story, but it's never mentioned and most of the time [[ButForMeItWasTuesday the victim doesn't even remember]] what it was.
** In "Cask of Amontillado", while the full nature of the "insult" may never be known, Poe scholars have narrowed it down to being related to class conflict. Montressor is the scion of an ancient noble family, while Fortunato appears to be "new money." Arrogant, vulgar, and ignorant of the manners of high society, Fortunato inadvertently slighted Montressor's family honor in such a way that could only be redressed through violent retribution. Some have even theorized that Fortunato made his money by fleecing Montressor or one of his fellow ancient noblemen.
*** This is addressed in Music/TheAlanParsonsProject song based on this story:
---->Ye who are rich and whose troubles are few\\
May come around to see my point of view;\\
[[NightmareFuel What price the crown of a king on a throne]]\\
[[NightmareFuel When you're trapped in the dark, all alone?]]

to:

* NoodleIncident: Readers rarely get to learn ''why'' the narrator - especially the one in "Cask of Amontillado" - is pursuing a cold and cruel revenge against his nemesis/victim. There was some slight made back well before the story, but it's never mentioned and most of the time [[ButForMeItWasTuesday the victim doesn't even remember]] what it was.
** In "Cask of Amontillado", while the full nature of the "insult" may never be known, Poe scholars have narrowed it down to being related to class conflict. Montressor is the scion of an ancient noble family, while Fortunato appears to be "new money." Arrogant, vulgar, and ignorant of the manners of high society, Fortunato inadvertently slighted Montressor's family honor in such a way that could only be redressed through violent retribution. Some have even theorized that Fortunato made his money by fleecing Montressor or one of his fellow ancient noblemen.
*** This is addressed in Music/TheAlanParsonsProject song based on this story:
---->Ye who are rich and whose troubles are few\\
May come around to see my point of view;\\
[[NightmareFuel What price the crown of a king on a throne]]\\
[[NightmareFuel When you're trapped in the dark, all alone?]]
was.



* PsychologicalTormentZone: The house of the Ushers.
* ReversePsychology: In "The Cask of Amontillado", Montresor has made sure his servants leave his mansion for the night by ordering them "not to stir from the house" in his absence, and persuades Fortunato to keep going deeper into the catacombs by telling him he will just ask Luchresi instead, a man who Fortunato strongly feels is an inferior connoisseur of wines.



* SanitySlippage: Many a Poe protagonist ("The Tell-Tale Heart" and "Fall of the House of Usher" are two examples) suffers this plight.
* ScarecrowSolution: Used in ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'', to scare mutineers into abandoning ship by convincing them it's haunted.

to:

* SanitySlippage: Many a Poe protagonist ("The Tell-Tale Heart" and "Fall of the House of Usher" are two examples) suffers this plight.
* ScarecrowSolution: Used in ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'', to scare mutineers into abandoning ship by convincing them it's haunted.
plight.



* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: "The Tell-Tale Heart" opens with the narrator identifying themselves as not being mad.



* TerribleTicking: "The Telltale Heart" is the TropeMaker and the TropeNamer, as well as a case of BeatStillMyHeart.



* {{Troll}}: Most of ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'' is trolling readers of exploration narratives.



** Hell, the narrator in "The Cask of Amontillado" tells the reader that they of course should trust him, [[LampshadeHanging because he is the narrator of the story, and therefore must be reliable.]]
** Perhaps the most obvious example is in "The Tell-Tale Heart," which is delivered as a borderline rant by an insane [[AmbiguousGender wo/man]] (trying to convince the audience s/he is sane). The entire point is that the Narrator is certain of things that are obviously untrue.
1st Jun '16 2:47:03 AM foxley
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Added DiffLines:

* PendulumOfDeath: "The Pit and the Pendulum" is the TropeMaker for this particular DeathTrap.
18th May '16 6:04:52 PM LadyNorbert
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His works were the inspiration for the first album from Music/TheAlanParsonsProject.

to:

His works were the inspiration for the first album from Music/TheAlanParsonsProject.
Music/TheAlanParsonsProject and for a series of PC mystery games called the ''VideoGame/DarkTales''.
6th Apr '16 5:15:10 PM Pallo
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* TheCavalry: The narrator of "The Pit and the Pendulum", a captive of the Spanish Inquisition, is saved from his death trap prison at the last moment by French troops moving into Toledo. This places the story during the Peninsular War (1807-1814).

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* TheCavalry: The narrator of "The Pit and the Pendulum", a captive of the Spanish Inquisition, [[DeusExMachina is saved from his death trap prison at the last moment moment]] by French troops moving into Toledo. This places the story during the Peninsular War (1807-1814).



* DeusExMachina: The protagonist from ''The Pit and the Pendulum'' is [[spoiler: saved just as he is about to fall to his death in the aforementioned pit by general Lasalle when the french troops arrive in Toledo and capture the inquisitors]].
3rd Apr '16 2:13:59 PM Pallo
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Added DiffLines:

* DeusExMachina: The protagonist from ''The Pit and the Pendulum'' is [[spoiler: saved just as he is about to fall to his death in the aforementioned pit by general Lasalle when the french troops arrive in Toledo and capture the inquisitors]].
28th Dec '15 3:53:47 AM LordGro
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* ConvictionByCounterfactualClue: "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" contains gibberish that every listener identifies as a language they don't know. It turns out to be the "speech" of [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys an orangutan]] - which wouldn't sound much like any of the mentioned languages if Poe had ever heard it. Some of the information about corpse bloating in "The Mystery of Marie Roget" is also wrong, but Poe was working with the knowledge of his day, so ScienceMarchesOn.
** Of course the gibberish wouldn't sound anything like the languages the people thought they heard, but aural pareidolia can play some mean tricks on the ears.
28th Dec '15 3:43:49 AM LordGro
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* TheCavalry: "The Pit and the Pendulum." After all, otherwise we'd be stuck with an UndeadAuthor.

to:

* TheCavalry: The narrator of "The Pit and the Pendulum." After all, otherwise we'd be stuck with an UndeadAuthor.Pendulum", a captive of the Spanish Inquisition, is saved from his death trap prison at the last moment by French troops moving into Toledo. This places the story during the Peninsular War (1807-1814).
28th Dec '15 3:38:02 AM LordGro
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* DeadMansChest: "The Oblong Box". You'll be shocked to learn what is in the box... [[SarcasmMode so shocked.]]

to:

* DeadMansChest: In "The Oblong Box". You'll be shocked to learn what is in Box", a young widower on a sea-journey keeps the box... [[SarcasmMode so shocked.]]embalmed corpse of his wife in a wooden luggage box to transport the body to his wife's hometown.
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