History Creator / EdgarAllanPoe

20th Feb '17 9:05:23 PM Angeldeb82
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* FunetikAksent: [[EthnicScrappy Jupiter's]] "Negro dialect" is written this way in "The Gold Bug," with a little bit of {{Engrish}} and BuffySpeak as well.

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* FunetikAksent: [[EthnicScrappy Jupiter's]] "Negro dialect" is written this way in "The Gold Bug," with a little bit of {{Engrish}} [[AsianSpeekeeEngrish African Speekee Engrish]] and BuffySpeak as well.
20th Feb '17 9:03:55 PM Angeldeb82
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The [[TropeMakers inventor]] of the modern [[HorrorLiterature horror story]] and the modern [[DetectiveLiterature detective story]], as well as an early influence on the [[SpeculativeFiction science fiction]] genre. [[http://www.eapoe.org/works/essays/philcomp.htm Poe believed that all stories should be short enough to be read in one sitting.]] He also believed that the perfect subject for poetry is the death of a beautiful young woman[[note]]To be precise, he thought it perfect because it married the "most poetical subject"-- Beauty-- with the "most poetical emotion"-- Melancholy.[[/note]] (which should tell you volumes about [[CreatorBreakdown his own love life]], not to mention the death of his mother and his adoptive mother at a young age). Poe's life was plagued by rifts with his adoptive father, deaths of numerous loved ones, and alcoholism. [[CreatorBreakdown Typical]]. He was also a noted CausticCritic, which undoubtedly earned him a few enemies and tarnished his reputation, despite the critical acclaim that he received.

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The [[TropeMakers inventor]] of the modern [[HorrorLiterature horror story]] and the modern [[DetectiveLiterature detective story]], as well as an early influence on the [[SpeculativeFiction science fiction]] genre. [[http://www.eapoe.org/works/essays/philcomp.htm Poe believed that all stories should be short enough to be read in one sitting.]] He also believed that the perfect subject for poetry is the death of a beautiful young woman[[note]]To be precise, he thought it perfect because it married the "most poetical subject"-- Beauty-- with the "most poetical emotion"-- Melancholy.[[/note]] (which should tell you volumes about [[CreatorBreakdown his own love life]], not to mention the death of his mother and his adoptive mother at a young age). Poe's life was plagued by rifts with his adoptive father, deaths of numerous loved ones, and alcoholism. [[CreatorBreakdown Typical]]. Typical.]] He was also a noted CausticCritic, which undoubtedly earned him a few enemies and tarnished his reputation, despite the critical acclaim that he received.



* TakeThatAudience[=/=]TakeThatMe: "The Premature Burial." In the end, having mistakenly thought himself buried alive and found that he wasn't, the narrator overcomes his fears. One of the changes is that he "read no bugaboo tales--''[[HypocrisyNod such as this]].''" (Italics Poe's.)

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* TakeThatAudience[=/=]TakeThatMe: TakeThatAudience[=/=]SelfDeprecation: "The Premature Burial." In the end, having mistakenly thought himself buried alive and found that he wasn't, the narrator overcomes his fears. One of the changes is that he "read no bugaboo tales--''[[HypocrisyNod such as this]].''" (Italics Poe's.)



* YourCostumeNeedsWork: "The Masque of the Red Death". The guests at the MasqueradeBall are all shocked by the tastelessness one fellow displays by dressing as the incarnation of [[ThePlague the Red Death]]. Then someone rips his mask off and finds there's [[NoFaceUnderTheMask nothing underneath...]]

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* YourCostumeNeedsWork: "The Masque of the Red Death". The guests at the MasqueradeBall are all shocked by the tastelessness one fellow displays by dressing as the incarnation of [[ThePlague the Red Death]]. Then someone rips his mask off and finds there's [[NoFaceUnderTheMask nothing underneath...]]
underneath]]...
6th Feb '17 4:23:29 PM ErebusElysium
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* "Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado"

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* "Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado"''Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado''



* "Literature/TheFallOfTheHouseOfUsher"

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* "Literature/TheFallOfTheHouseOfUsher"''Literature/TheFallOfTheHouseOfUsher''
* ''Literature/TheMasqueOfTheRedDeath''



* "Literature/TheRaven"
* "Literature/TheTellTaleHeart"

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* "Literature/TheRaven"
''Literature/TheRaven''
* "Literature/TheTellTaleHeart"
''Literature/TheTellTaleHeart''
16th Nov '16 10:28:47 AM mlsmithca
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!!Works by Edgar Allen Poe with their own trope pages include:

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!!Works by Edgar Allen Allan Poe with their own trope pages include:



!!Edgar Allen Poe's other works provide examples of:

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!!Edgar Allen Allan Poe's other works provide examples of:
7th Oct '16 2:58:30 AM Psychopompos007
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His works were the inspiration for the first album from Music/TheAlanParsonsProject and for a series of PC mystery games called the ''VideoGame/DarkTales''.

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His works were the inspiration for the first album from Music/TheAlanParsonsProject and for a series of PC mystery games called the ''VideoGame/DarkTales''.
''VideoGame/DarkTales''. His work is also one of the inspirations for the ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' GameMod ''Videogame/SolidAndShade''.
26th Aug '16 4:21:47 PM 04tele
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* DeadpanSnarker: His book reviews are made of this, especially the negative ones. In an otherwise positive review of Rufus W. Griswold's ''The Poets and Poetry of America'', there's this relatively mild example:
-->The volume opens with a preface, which with some little supererogation, is addressed "To the Reader"; inducing very naturally the query, whether the whole book is not addressed to the same individual.



* OneBookAuthor: He produced a long list of poems and short stories, but ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'' was his only novel.

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* OneBookAuthor: He produced wrote a long list lot of poems and short stories, and even more essays, articles and book reviews, but ''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'' was his only novel.



* SpringtimeForHitler: A certain Rufus Wilmot Griswold had a thorn in the side of Poe. After Poe's death, Griswold tried hard to ruin Poe's reputation. Most famously, he wrote a subversive biography where Poe was depicted as arrogant, evil, constantly drunk or high and very mentally unstable. Unfortunately for Griswold, this didn't deter people from enjoying Poe, instead spawned interest in the author and made him a legend surrounded by myths. [[EvilIsCool Who wouldn't want to read a story written by a man who was described as being "evil"]]?

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* SpringtimeForHitler: A certain Rufus Wilmot Griswold had a thorn in the side of Poe. After Poe's death, Griswold tried hard to ruin Poe's reputation. Most famously, he wrote a subversive biography where Poe was depicted as arrogant, evil, constantly drunk or high and very mentally unstable. Unfortunately for Griswold, this didn't deter people from enjoying Poe, instead spawned interest in the author and made him a legend surrounded by myths. [[EvilIsCool Who wouldn't want to read a story written by a man who was described as being "evil"]]?"evil"]]?[[note]]Griswold's dislike of Poe may have been caused by a review Poe wrote of Griswold's book ''The Poets and Poetry of America: with a Historical Introduction'', which although very positive ("Mr. Griswold [...] has entitled himself to the thanks of his countrymen, while showing himself a man of taste, talent, ''and tact''") didn't actually call it the greatest book of its kind ever written. Griswold is only remembered today as being the guy who tried to deter people from reading Poe.[[/note]]
26th Aug '16 4:13:30 PM 04tele
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Added DiffLines:

* CurbStompBattle: Averted in most of his stories but a common feature of his book reviews. Poe was an acute critic who passed the essential test of perceiving who of his own contemporaries were talented: he was very positive about Creator/NathanielHawthorne and Creator/CharlesDickens and cautiously approving about Longfellow, but less gifted writers he gleefully beat into a fine paste. Choice examples are his reviews of Theodore S. Fay's ''Norman Leslie'', George Jones's ''Ancient America'', and the most famous of all, the so-called Drake-Halleck Review, a brutal takedown of Joseph Rodman Drake's ''The Culprit Fay and other Poems'' and Fitz Greene Halleck's ''Alnwick Castle, with other Poems''.
15th Aug '16 9:52:36 AM Hydrosoul
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Added DiffLines:

* MonsterClown: Hop-Frog was the king's court jester until he had it with the poor treatment he and his friend Trippetta had been receiving and dresses eight people as [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys orangutans]] for an upcoming MasqueradeBall and lit them [[ManOnFire on]] [[KillItWithFire fire]] as an "act", all for {{Revenge}}.
13th Jun '16 9:22:02 PM PaulA
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* The WindowsOfTheSoul: "The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether".
-->'' "Keeping these impressions in view, I was cautious in what I said''
-->''before the young lady; for I could not be sure that she was sane;''
-->''and, in fact, there was a certain restless brilliancy about her eyes''
-->''which half led me to imagine she was not. "''


Added DiffLines:

* WindowsOfTheSoul: "The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether".
-->''"Keeping these impressions in view, I was cautious in what I said before the young lady; for I could not be sure that she was sane; and, in fact, there was a certain restless brilliancy about her eyes which half led me to imagine she was not."''
13th Jun '16 1:15:26 AM PaulA
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* Literature/CAugusteDupin stories



* DetectiveLiterature: Poe is considered the inventor of the genre through his "tales of ratiocination" featuring the French detective Auguste Dupin ("The Mystery of Marie Roget", "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", and "The Purloined Letter").



* EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys: Subverted in "Murders in the Rue Morgue".



* GentlemanDetective: Dupin, considered the TropeMaker.



* GreatDetective: C. Auguste Dupin.



* HiddenInPlainSight: "The Purloined Letter".



* InnerMonologueConversation: Dupin is famously capable of responding to his companion's inner monologue, by deducing from body language what he must have been thinking about.
* InspiredBy: The murder of Marie Roget, a Dupin mystery.
** Also, his unfinished play ''Politian'' was a fictionalization of a famous duel case of the time.

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* InnerMonologueConversation: Dupin is famously capable of responding to his companion's inner monologue, by deducing from body language what he must have been thinking about.
* InspiredBy: The murder of Marie Roget, a Dupin mystery.
** Also, his
His unfinished play ''Politian'' was a fictionalization of a famous duel case of the time.



* LockedRoomMystery: ''The Murders in the Rue Morgue''



* LukeIAmYourFather: Certain critics think D, in "The Purloined Letter," is Dupin's father. Others think the two men may be brothers, as indicated by the reference Dupin makes to the ancient Greek twins Atreus and Thyestes. Still others say certain critics are completely nuts.
** Played for laughs in the comedy story (yes, really) "The Spectacles," where the [[BlindWithoutEm extremely near-sighted]] narrator falls in love with a beautiful woman who turns out to be his great-great-grandmother.

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* LukeIAmYourFather: Certain critics think D, in "The Purloined Letter," is Dupin's father. Others think the two men may be brothers, as indicated by the reference Dupin makes to the ancient Greek twins Atreus and Thyestes. Still others say certain critics are completely nuts.
**
Played for laughs in the comedy story (yes, really) "The Spectacles," where the [[BlindWithoutEm extremely near-sighted]] narrator falls in love with a beautiful woman who turns out to be his great-great-grandmother.



* NoNameGiven: Dupin's {{sidekick}}.
** This is actually quite frequent in Poe. It's generally an omission as a result of first-person narration, with the exception of the protagonist of "William Wilson," who refuses to give his name because he's piled too much infamy upon it.

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* NoNameGiven: Dupin's {{sidekick}}.
**
This is actually quite frequent in Poe. It's generally an omission as a result of first-person narration, with the exception of the protagonist of "William Wilson," who refuses to give his name because he's piled too much infamy upon it.



* {{Profiling}}: How Dupin figures out that the thief of "The Purloined Letter" hid the letter in plain sight on a letter rack, and how he figures out that the killer in "The Murders in the Rue-Morgue" is an orangutan.



* ShaggyDogStory: Although Dupin solves the case of "The Murder of Marie Roget," the audience isn't informed of more than Dupin's complex reasoning. This is partly because the story is inspired by real events, which themselves were never solved.
* SherlockScan: Helped establish this trope [[OlderThanTheyThink pre-Sherlock]] with his C. Auguste Dupin stories.
* {{Sidekick}}: The narrator of Dupin's stories.



* TheSummation: "The Purloined Letter"



* WikiWalk: In "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," C. Auguste Dupin shows off his general awesomeness by tracking the narrator's train of thought through fifteen minutes of silent walking and several mental topic shifts, and saying exactly the right thing at the end.
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