History Creator / Confucius

20th Apr '18 1:37:32 AM CyrilPMG
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* YoungestChildWins: Yan Zhengzai, Confucius's mother. She was the youngest of the three Yan daughters. When the 65-year old Shu Lianghe made a request of a marriage to the Yan family, Zhengzai's father asked his three daughters who was willing to marry him. The two older sisters did not answer, but Zhengzai said she was OK. Through this marriage, she became the mother of one of the wisest Chinese men.
20th Apr '18 1:02:28 AM CyrilPMG
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* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.

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* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, Creator/{{Laozi}}, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.
20th Apr '18 1:01:49 AM CyrilPMG
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* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.
20th Apr '18 12:42:42 AM CyrilPMG
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* BookEnds: According to a legend, a ''qilin'' announced Confucius's birth to his mother. Years later, another ''qilin'' was injured by a charioteer. This was considered as a prediction of Confucius's death, which happened short later.

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* BookEnds: According to a legend, a ''qilin'' announced Confucius's birth to his mother. Years later, another ''qilin'' was injured by a charioteer. This was considered as a prediction of Confucius's death, which happened a short time later.
20th Apr '18 12:39:21 AM CyrilPMG
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Added DiffLines:

* BookEnds: According to a legend, a ''qilin'' announced Confucius's birth to his mother. Years later, another ''qilin'' was injured by a charioteer. This was considered as a prediction of Confucius's death, which happened short later.
9th Nov '17 4:18:47 PM dlchen145
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'Confucius' is the name given to an extremely influential Chinese philosopher who lived in the 6th century BC. After his death, his teachings were compiled in a work known in the English-speaking world as the ''Analects of Confucius'' (Traditional: 論語; Simplified: 论语; Pinyin: ''Lún Yǔ'', lit. "discussion over Confucius' words" -- though analects means "a collection of excerpts from a literary work" and is thus an inaccurate translation).

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'Confucius' (September 28, 551 BC 479 BC) is the name given to an extremely influential Chinese philosopher who lived in the 6th century BC. After his death, his teachings were compiled in a work known in the English-speaking world as the ''Analects of Confucius'' (Traditional: 論語; Simplified: 论语; Pinyin: ''Lún Yǔ'', lit. "discussion over Confucius' words" -- though analects means "a collection of excerpts from a literary work" and is thus an inaccurate translation).
11th Oct '17 3:15:46 AM YZQ
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* TheGoldenRule: Played with. In every relationship, Confucius advocates that both parties have their responsibilities. Just as the son should be filial, so should the father be benevolent in return; just as the minister should be loyal, so should the sovereign be benevolent in return.



* HonorRelatedAbuse: Up against an AbusiveParent or AbusiveSpouse? So long as the beatings don't cause lasting harm, endure them, because that's what filial piety demands.

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* HonorRelatedAbuse: Up against an AbusiveParent or AbusiveSpouse? So long as the beatings don't cause lasting harm, endure them, because that's what filial piety demands. However, as the MyMasterRightOrWrong entry shows, Confucius actually advocates that both parties in a relationship (parent-child, between spouses) have their respective duties.
27th Sep '17 2:37:49 AM YZQ
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*TraumaCongaLine: Confucius's final years were filled with tragedy as his only son and two disciples (Yan Hui and Zhong You) predeceased him. In particular, he himself passed away about one year after Zhong You's violent death.
25th Sep '17 7:16:28 PM YZQ
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Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are targeted at the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]

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Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are targeted at more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]
24th Sep '17 9:29:47 PM YZQ
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Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage.[[/note]]

to:

Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are targeted at the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]
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