History Creator / CarlBarks

10th Jun '18 6:26:24 AM nombretomado
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5th Jun '18 10:01:53 AM Byzantine
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* ShinyNewAustralia: In "The Golden Helmet", the eponymous helmet was proof an ancient viking named Olaf the Blue was the true owner of North America, theoretically allowing any (alleged) descendant of his to use it to take over the continent. When DonaldDuck got the helmet, an attorney offered to help Donald and wanted Canada as his legal fees.

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* ShinyNewAustralia: In "The Golden Helmet", the eponymous helmet was proof an ancient viking named Olaf the Blue was the true owner of North America, America (the first European to ever reach it), theoretically allowing any (alleged) descendant of his to use it to take over the continent. When DonaldDuck got the helmet, an attorney offered to help Donald and wanted Canada as his legal fees. In the story, the helmet passes through the hands of several characters, and nearly all of them are corrupted into becoming would-be tyrants for the entire North America.
5th Jun '18 9:58:34 AM Byzantine
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Barks is renowned for creating characters such as Scrooge [=McDuck=], Gladstone Gander, Gyro Gearloose, the Beagle Boys, Flintheart Glomgold, Magica De Spell, and many others, as well as setting in stone the base geography of the city of Duckburg. His stories brought in the treasure hunt plot to Duck comics and inspired a generation of people (such as Creator/GeorgeLucas, Creator/StevenSpielberg, Creator/OsamuTezuka, Creator/DonRosa, Creator/RobertCrumb, Creator/ArtSpiegelman and the writers of ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'') to replicate the thrill of adventure. He's also responsible for expanding Donald Duck's personality beyond his usual one-note characterization in the WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts; reaching levels that were never rivaled in the animated appearances of the character.

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Barks is renowned for creating characters such as Scrooge [=McDuck=], Gladstone Gander, Gyro Gearloose, the Beagle Boys, Flintheart Glomgold, Magica De Spell, and many others, as well as setting in stone the base geography of the city of Duckburg. His stories brought in the treasure hunt plot to Duck comics and inspired a generation of people (such as Creator/GeorgeLucas, Creator/StevenSpielberg, Creator/OsamuTezuka, Creator/DonRosa, Creator/RobertCrumb, Creator/ArtSpiegelman and the writers of ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'') to replicate the thrill of adventure. He's He is also responsible for expanding Donald Duck's personality beyond his usual one-note characterization in the WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts; reaching levels that were never rivaled in the animated appearances of the character.



* ScoobyDooHoax: On occasion the heroes would come across as this, most notably in "The Hound of the Whiskervilles."

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* ScoobyDooHoax: On occasion the heroes would come across as this, most notably in "The Hound of the Whiskervilles."" The notorious monstrous hound that has been attacking the Clan [=McDuck=] for centuries, was just a series of men from a rival clan wearing a disguise. The monster's supposed invulnerability to the weapons of his opponents was simply due to wearing armor beneath the disguise.
5th Jun '18 9:51:54 AM Byzantine
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* GreyAndGrayMorality: Uniquely for kids' comics at the time, there are very few people in Barks's comics that are unambiguously good or unambiguously bad. Most people are firmly in-between, and several of the conflicts don't have a clear good guy or a clear bad guy.

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* GreyAndGrayMorality: Uniquely for kids' comics at the time, there are very few people in Barks's comics that are unambiguously good or unambiguously bad. Most people are firmly in-between, and several of the conflicts don't have a clear good guy or a clear bad guy. Epitomized by Barks himself in an interview: "The thing that I consider most important about my work is this: I told it like it is. I told my readers that the bad guys have a little of good in them, and the good guys have a lot of bad in them, and that you can't depend on anything much; nothing is always going to turn out roses."
5th Jun '18 9:46:03 AM Byzantine
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* ExecutiveMeddling: Barks' comics often suffered from this. Several stories that were considered inappropriate were censored or just thrown out entirely, others were cut down to make room for adverts. Some material is most likely lost forever.
** One problem for his editors was that Barks had a taste for Westerns and horror films, and liked to incorporate such elements in his stories. Mummies, werewolves, zombies, magical and cursed objects, invisible men, Yetis, ghost ships, and skeletons entombed in castle walls all turn up in various stories. Some of his ideas were considered overly violent or creepy for an underage audience.
27th Apr '18 6:41:22 AM AlienPatch
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* One Donald ten-pager involved his being influenced by a quack psychologist named "Dr. Pulpheart Clabberhead," who believed any form of punishment administered to children was cruel. Clabberhead was a very thinly veiled parody of Dr. Spock, whose child-rearing books were popular at the time. The nephews used Donald's new softhearted philosophy to get away with everything and drive him nuts. Eventually they decided to light a stick of dynamite under Clabberhead's chair, causing the "doctor" to break his own doctrine by chasing them with a stick.

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* ** One Donald ten-pager involved his being influenced by a quack psychologist named "Dr. Pulpheart Clabberhead," who believed any form of punishment administered to children was cruel. Clabberhead was a very thinly veiled parody of Dr. Spock, whose child-rearing books were popular at the time. The nephews used Donald's new softhearted philosophy to get away with everything and drive him nuts. Eventually they decided to light a stick of dynamite under Clabberhead's chair, causing the "doctor" to break his own doctrine by chasing them with a stick.
27th Apr '18 6:38:13 AM AlienPatch
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** And Carl Barks is not considered cool? Comeon.

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** And in a meta sense, Carl Barks is not considered cool? Comeon.as well.
6th Mar '18 10:34:31 AM JessyS
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** Scrooge ended up being so popular that he eventually made his video debut in 1967 in the short WesternAnimation/Scrooge McDuck and Money.



** The only exceptions are Flintheart Glumgold and The Beagle Boys.



* ShinyNewAustralia: In "The Golden Helmet", the eponymous helmet was proof an ancient viking named Olaf the Blue was the true owner of North America, theorically allowing any (alleged) descendant of his to use it to take over the continent. When DonaldDuck got the helmet, an attorney offered to help Donald and wanted Canada as his legal fees.

to:

* ShinyNewAustralia: In "The Golden Helmet", the eponymous helmet was proof an ancient viking named Olaf the Blue was the true owner of North America, theorically theoretically allowing any (alleged) descendant of his to use it to take over the continent. When DonaldDuck got the helmet, an attorney offered to help Donald and wanted Canada as his legal fees.



** One Donald ten-pager involved his being influenced by a quack psychologist named "Dr. Pulpheart Clabberhead," who believed any form of punishment administered to children was cruel. Clabberhead was a very thinly veiled parody of Dr. Spock, whose child-rearing books were popular at the time. The nephews used Donald's new softhearted philosophy to get away with everything and drive him nuts. Eventually they decided to light a stick of dynamite under Clabberhead's chair, causing the "doctor" to break his own doctrine by chasing them with a stick.

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** Meanwhile, Huey, Dewey, and Louie each got easy questions and the prizes to boot.
*
One Donald ten-pager involved his being influenced by a quack psychologist named "Dr. Pulpheart Clabberhead," who believed any form of punishment administered to children was cruel. Clabberhead was a very thinly veiled parody of Dr. Spock, whose child-rearing books were popular at the time. The nephews used Donald's new softhearted philosophy to get away with everything and drive him nuts. Eventually they decided to light a stick of dynamite under Clabberhead's chair, causing the "doctor" to break his own doctrine by chasing them with a stick.


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** To be fair, Donald wanted to trick the nephews and Gyro by dressing up like a wolf, but the super intelligent wolf ended up dressing up like a man in order to trick Donald.
30th Jan '18 4:29:11 PM MackWylde
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Added DiffLines:

* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: More on the idealistic end of the scale.
19th Jan '18 2:36:58 PM costanton11
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Added DiffLines:

* ExecutiveMeddling: Barks' comics often suffered from this. Several stories that were considered inappropriate were censored or just thrown out entirely, others were cut down to make room for adverts. Some material is most likely lost forever.
** One problem for his editors was that Barks had a taste for Westerns and horror films, and liked to incorporate such elements in his stories. Mummies, werewolves, zombies, magical and cursed objects, invisible men, Yetis, ghost ships, and skeletons entombed in castle walls all turn up in various stories. Some of his ideas were considered overly violent or creepy for an underage audience.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.CarlBarks