History Creator / CBS

2nd May '16 4:41:39 PM themisterfree
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* ''WesternAnimation/FlyingRhinoJuniorHigh''
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Franklin}}''


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* ''WesternAnimation/RescueHeroes''


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** ''Wheel 2000'' (short-lived kids version, aired from 1997-98)
22nd Apr '16 12:53:29 AM Doug86
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Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge rural purge]]." While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.

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Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''MyFavoriteMartian'' ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge rural purge]]." While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.
21st Apr '16 4:57:03 PM themisterfree
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* ''Film/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' (1997)

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* ''Film/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' (1997)(1997; never actually aired in US)


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* ''Series/TopOfThePops'' (US version; only aired Friday late-nights from 1987-88)
14th Apr '16 5:40:11 AM Ominae
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8th Apr '16 9:38:50 PM Ominae
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* ''Series/RushHour''
23rd Mar '16 10:54:46 PM Mdumas43073
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By the mid-1990s, CBS mainly had its weekend sports coverage to fall back on, and when they lost rights to the NFL in 1994, the joke became "'''C'''an't '''B'''roadcast '''S'''ports". Not helping matters was CBS losing a number of key affiliates (Atlanta, Detroit, Milwaukee, Dallas and others) to Creator/{{Fox}}, leaving them to find affiliation elsewhere, many on UHF channels. Still without any solid hits, CBS ended up merging with Westinghouse [[note]]an old-style industrial conglomerate whose main attraction was their broadcasting division, which had been for years hamstrung with two of their stations being affiliated with Creator/{{NBC}}, which dictated heavily how to present their schedule and news against their wishes[[/note]] in 1995; this was prefaced by a deal that switched three [[note]]NBC affiliates KYW in UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} and WBZ in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, and ABC affiliate WJZ in Baltimore[[/note]] of Westinghouse's five stations to CBS.[[note]]The other two, KPIX in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco and KDKA in UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}}, were already CBS affiliates; the only change to them was less pre-emptions. The deal occurred due to WJZ in Baltimore losing its Creator/{{ABC}} affiliation to Creator/{{NBC}} affiliate WMAR-TV, something which angered Westinghouse and caused them to fear more defections. CBS picked up Philadelphia's KYW in this deal, which meant they had to sell longtime O&O WCAU. The buyer wound up being Creator/{{NBC}}, who had wanted to own a station in Philadelphia for decades and traded KCNC in UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} and KUTV in Salt Lake City for WCAU.[[/note]] A further merger occurred, this time with Viacom (CBS's own former distribution arm; now a major media conglomerate) in 2000. This was initially complicated by the fact that Viacom already owned half of {{UPN}}, and both CBS and UPN had owned-and-operated stations in many of the same markets (Philadelphia, Boston, Dallas-Fort Worth, Detroit, Miami, and Pittsburgh). Viacom cleared this hurdle when the FCC legalized duopolies, leading to the two networks becoming corporate siblings. CBS regained the NFL in 1998 when it aggressively outbid NBC for their expiring AFC rights, while NBC attempted (and failed) to get the rights to ''MondayNightFootball''.

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By the mid-1990s, CBS mainly had Meanwhile, CBS's sports coverage--long a mainstay of its weekend sports coverage programming--started to fall back on, hit a few road bumps of its own. The network lost the NBA in 1990, a 1990-93 deal with Major League Baseball was a financial and when ratings disaster, and after they lost rights to the NFL in 1994, the joke became "'''C'''an't '''B'''roadcast '''S'''ports". Not helping matters was CBS losing a number of key affiliates (Atlanta, Detroit, Milwaukee, Dallas and others) to Creator/{{Fox}}, leaving them to find affiliation elsewhere, many on UHF channels. Still without any solid hits, CBS ended up merging with Westinghouse [[note]]an old-style industrial conglomerate whose main attraction was their broadcasting division, which had been for years hamstrung with two of their stations being affiliated with Creator/{{NBC}}, which dictated heavily how to present their schedule and news against their wishes[[/note]] in 1995; this was prefaced by a deal that switched three [[note]]NBC affiliates KYW in UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} and WBZ in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, and ABC affiliate WJZ in Baltimore[[/note]] of Westinghouse's five stations to CBS.[[note]]The other two, KPIX in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco and KDKA in UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}}, were already CBS affiliates; the only change to them was less pre-emptions. The deal occurred due to WJZ in Baltimore losing its Creator/{{ABC}} affiliation to Creator/{{NBC}} affiliate WMAR-TV, something which angered Westinghouse and caused them to fear more defections. CBS picked up Philadelphia's KYW in this deal, which meant they had to sell longtime O&O WCAU. The buyer wound up being Creator/{{NBC}}, who had wanted to own a station in Philadelphia for decades and traded KCNC in UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} and KUTV in Salt Lake City for WCAU.[[/note]] A further merger occurred, this time with Viacom (CBS's own former distribution arm; now a major media conglomerate) in 2000. This was initially complicated by the fact that Viacom already owned half of {{UPN}}, and both CBS and UPN had owned-and-operated stations in many of the same markets (Philadelphia, Boston, Dallas-Fort Worth, Detroit, Miami, and Pittsburgh). Viacom cleared this hurdle when the FCC legalized duopolies, leading to the two networks becoming corporate siblings. CBS regained the NFL in 1998 when it aggressively outbid NBC for their expiring AFC rights, while NBC attempted (and failed) to get the rights to ''MondayNightFootball''.
23rd Mar '16 10:45:25 PM Mdumas43073
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In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this was now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?--and CBS continued to proudly tout itself as "America's Most-Watched Network".

to:

In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this was now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network broadcast TV nowadays?--and CBS continued to proudly tout itself as "America's Most-Watched Network".
23rd Mar '16 10:44:40 PM Mdumas43073
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In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this is now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?--and CBS continues to proudly tout itself as "America's Most-Watched Network".

to:

In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this is was now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?--and CBS continues continued to proudly tout itself as "America's Most-Watched Network".
23rd Mar '16 10:42:37 PM Mdumas43073
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In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this is now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?

to:

In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and geared toward older viewers. However, this is now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?
nowadays?--and CBS continues to proudly tout itself as "America's Most-Watched Network".
23rd Mar '16 10:39:51 PM Mdumas43073
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In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and became staples for older viewers, causing a shift to older demographics. However, this is now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, who still watches network TV nowadays?

to:

In the TurnOfTheMillennium, CBS started turning itself around, debuting the megahits ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' in 2000, and following them up over the next few years with a number of hit {{police procedural}}s (including ''CSI'''s [[Series/CSINewYork first two]] [[Series/CSIMiami spinoffs]]) and [[{{Sitcom}} sitcoms]]. The network recovered from the abyss, running neck-and-neck with {{Fox}} for the number one spot in the ratings, and started becoming popular with younger audiences again... just as network television viewership overall started to decline with the rise of NewMedia. That said, CBS seems to be handling the new media shift far better than the new Viacom has; they've invested heavily in streaming, going as far as putting several classic Paramount/Desilu shows (which were retained by CBS after Paramount's film studio was allocated to the new Viacom in the split) such as ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and ''Series/MacGyver'' up for viewing, and also bought CNET Networks' family of websites in 2008, rebranding it as CBS Interactive (this subsidiary also includes GameFAQs, Last.fm, Metacritic and TV.com, in addition to the various CNET websites). Nevertheless, the old joke about being the "network for the living dead" arose again in the early [[TheNewTens 2010s]], as its shows became increasingly [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] and became staples for geared toward older viewers, causing a shift to older demographics. viewers. However, this is now a ''winning'' strategy--after all, who which demographic still watches network TV nowadays?
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.CBS