History Creator / CBS

19th Sep '16 9:29:25 PM Mdumas43073
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* ''Series/{{Bull}}''
22nd Aug '16 8:52:21 AM darkpowrjd
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During the 1950s and 1960s, CBS had, arguably, the greatest television news department in the world. With anchors like Edward R. Murrow (the man who fought [[RedScare Joe McCarthy]] and won) and Walter Cronkite ("The Most Trusted Man in America"), and shows like ''Series/SixtyMinutes'', CBS News ruled the roost. Their ''CBS Reports'' specials became famous. In 1960, Murrow's ''CBS Reports'' documentary ''Harvest of Shame'' showed the plight of American migrant agricultural workers, and is acknowledged as one of the greatest news stories ever. ''Harvest of Shame'' forever changed the nature of TV news and set the tone for a generation of investigative journalists. Their cut-in to report of the [[John F. Kennedy]] assassination (the entire report) has since been inducted into the Smithsonian, and set the tone for the reporting of breaking news for years to come.

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During the 1950s and 1960s, CBS had, arguably, the greatest television news department in the world. With anchors like Edward R. Murrow (the man who fought [[RedScare Joe McCarthy]] and won) and Walter Cronkite ("The Most Trusted Man in America"), and shows like ''Series/SixtyMinutes'', CBS News ruled the roost. Their ''CBS Reports'' specials became famous. In 1960, Murrow's ''CBS Reports'' documentary ''Harvest of Shame'' showed the plight of American migrant agricultural workers, and is acknowledged as one of the greatest news stories ever. ''Harvest of Shame'' forever changed the nature of TV news and set the tone for a generation of investigative journalists. Their cut-in to report of the [[John F. Kennedy]] JohnFKennedy assassination (the entire report) has since been inducted into the Smithsonian, and set the tone for the reporting of breaking news for years to come.
22nd Aug '16 8:51:13 AM darkpowrjd
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During the 1950s and 1960s, CBS had, arguably, the greatest television news department in the world. With anchors like Edward R. Murrow (the man who fought [[RedScare Joe McCarthy]] and won) and Walter Cronkite ("The Most Trusted Man in America"), and shows like ''Series/SixtyMinutes'', CBS News ruled the roost. Their ''CBS Reports'' specials became famous. In 1960, Murrow's ''CBS Reports'' documentary ''Harvest of Shame'' showed the plight of American migrant agricultural workers, and is acknowledged as one of the greatest news stories ever. ''Harvest of Shame'' forever changed the nature of TV news and set the tone for a generation of investigative journalists.

to:

During the 1950s and 1960s, CBS had, arguably, the greatest television news department in the world. With anchors like Edward R. Murrow (the man who fought [[RedScare Joe McCarthy]] and won) and Walter Cronkite ("The Most Trusted Man in America"), and shows like ''Series/SixtyMinutes'', CBS News ruled the roost. Their ''CBS Reports'' specials became famous. In 1960, Murrow's ''CBS Reports'' documentary ''Harvest of Shame'' showed the plight of American migrant agricultural workers, and is acknowledged as one of the greatest news stories ever. ''Harvest of Shame'' forever changed the nature of TV news and set the tone for a generation of investigative journalists.
journalists. Their cut-in to report of the [[John F. Kennedy]] assassination (the entire report) has since been inducted into the Smithsonian, and set the tone for the reporting of breaking news for years to come.
18th Aug '16 6:06:39 AM CaptEquinox
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Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as "UsefulNotes/TheRuralPurge". While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.

to:

Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience [[ViewersAreMorons needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. "]][[/note]]. The rise increasing use of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as "UsefulNotes/TheRuralPurge". While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.
9th Aug '16 1:31:25 PM faunas
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Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as "TheRuralPurge". While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.

to:

Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as "TheRuralPurge"."UsefulNotes/TheRuralPurge". While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.
9th Aug '16 1:27:11 PM faunas
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Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge rural purge]]." While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.

to:

Through the '60s, its primetime programs were mostly rural-themed sitcoms, such as ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'', ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' and ''Series/GreenAcres''; fantasies like ''Series/MyFavoriteMartian'' and ''Series/MyLivingDoll''; and domestic comedies like ''Series/TheDonnaReedShow''.[[note]]Aubrey believed the TV audience needed uncomplicated "dumb fun."[[/note]]. The rise of {{demographics}} in the late '60s produced a decision to project a more urbane image and reach for a younger, more urban/suburban, more marketer-friendly demographic. This led CBS to cancel all these shows and more ''en masse'' in 1971, in what came to be known as the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge rural purge]]." "TheRuralPurge". While this went on at NBC and ABC as well, it was especially pronounced at CBS, the network most associated with such shows. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on ''Green Acres'', commented that "it was the year CBS canceled everything with a tree." A number of these shows survived in UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, but the landscape of CBS and the networks in general was far more urban than it had been just a year or two prior.
19th Jul '16 6:28:12 PM themisterfree
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* ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends''
** ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldSpecials''


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* ''Series/MatchGame'' (1973-79; revival of NBC series, has since been revived multiple times)
30th Jun '16 9:03:04 AM Discar
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* ''Series/BrainDead''

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* ''Series/BrainDead''''Series/BrainDead2016''
27th Jun '16 12:04:01 PM TargetmasterJoe
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* ''Series/BrainDead''
2nd May '16 4:41:39 PM themisterfree
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* ''WesternAnimation/FlyingRhinoJuniorHigh''
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Franklin}}''


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* ''WesternAnimation/RescueHeroes''


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** ''Wheel 2000'' (short-lived kids version, aired from 1997-98)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.CBS