History Creator / BruceCoville

31st Jan '17 4:00:15 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* CassandraTruth: Despite the gang's repeated attempts to convince the adults on the island, especially Dr. Hwa, that there's a dangerous threat, most of the adults (except for Dr. Remov, who's the one who actually told them about G.H.O.S.T. and Black Glove in the first place) just ignore them. [[spoiler: Ultimately subverted when it turns out Dr. Hwa knew they were telling the truth the whole time, but covered it up because he ''was'' Black Glove!]]


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* IWarnedYou: Dr. Remov has believed in G.H.O.S.T. and Black Glove all along, but his friend Dr. Mercury always thought the idea was nonsense. [[spoiler: In ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'', Remov gets to say he was right when Black Glove formally reveals himself.]]
31st Jan '17 3:06:58 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* BubblePipe: Dr. Mercury uses one.


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* GlowingEyesOfDoom: Sgt. Brody's security robots have these.


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* MeaningfulName: Dr. Mercury's surname is regarded as fitting by the narration, due to his being the smallest and roundest of the scientists.
* MechanicalMonster: Sgt. Brody's security robots are big, tough and terrifying.


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* PoliceAreUseless: Sgt. Brody and his security team are more obstructive than helpful when the gang is trying to crack the spy case on the island, interfering in their efforts to stop the mad bomber in ''Operation Sherlock'' and get needed parts or save their friends in ''Robot Trouble''. It gets worse in ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'' when Brody has the security robots reprogrammed so the gang can't control them anymore - despite the fact that their doing so had saved several lives in the previous book. [[spoiler: There's also the fact that he fell for two frame-up jobs, one by Ramon Korbuscek to frame his roommate for treason in ''Robot Trouble'', and one by Black Glove himself that targeted Bridget [=McGrory=] in ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'', making it look like ''she'' was Black Glove! Averted with [=McGrory=] herself, who turns out to be a member of the National Security Task Force and thus outranks Brody.]]


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* RobotDog: Rin Tin Stainless Steel, a "mechanical mutt" the gang built as a test project, who first appeared in ''The Cutlass Clue'' and makes return appearances in ''Robot Trouble'' and ''Forever Begins Tomorrow''.
* RobotMaid: Housekeeping robots appear throughout the books, though they're usually designed for specialty chores. For instance, the Wendell-Watson home has a robot designed to clean rooms (though it's no match for the disaster area that is Wendy's bedroom), the Phillips family owns a robot that cleans up after meals and washes the dishes and silverware inside itself, and the Gang itself keeps a primitive butler-bot to greet people at their headquarters.


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* TerrorHero: Sgt. Brody's security robots. Brody himself, in one of his smarter moments, explains that they're designed to scare an enemy out of their wits with their intimidating appearance.
25th Jan '17 9:12:17 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* BigfootSasquatchAndYeti: The focus of ''Cry of the Sasquatch'', the film the characters are making in the first book. And then it turns out they're ''real'', and have been living near the camp for some time.
25th Jan '17 8:26:51 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* CulturePolice: Myrna Smud's idea of censorship involves trying to wipe out anything creative (such as outdoor advertising, monsters and ''fairy tales''), which she claims will stimulate the imagination and lead to crime.
* TheIgor: He's even ''named'' Igor, and accompanies Sigmund Fred to the contest, but isn't planning to be a contestant himself.



* PungeonMaster: Kevver Smith in ''Monster of the Year'' makes them all the time. His friend Michael [=McGraw=] has learned to tune him out when he does so.

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* PungeonMaster: Kevver Smith in ''Monster of the Year'' makes them puns all the time. His friend Michael [=McGraw=] has learned to tune him out when he does so.so.
* ThisMeansWar: The Count is the one to say it after Myrna Smud's motivations are revealed while they're in Michael's living room, watching her on TV:
-->'''TV interviewer''': "Just what is it about the monsters that bothers you so much, Mrs. Smud?
-->'''Myrna Smud''': [[spoiler: "They overstimulate children's imaginations. This causes them to think too much, which is not healthy at a young age."]]
-->''Everyone in the room looks at one another in astonishment, except for...''
-->'''The Count''' (rises, trembling with anger): "This, means var!"




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* WouldHurtAChild: During the big riot the night of the contest, Myrna Smud whacks young Lulu Toomaloo, who's been leading a cheer in support of the monsters, over the head with her "Ban all monsters" sign. That's what triggers the crowd to go ''completely'' nuts and turns them all in favor of Lulu.
25th Jan '17 11:25:12 AM AnoneMouseJr
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* DisneyDeath: [[spoiler: Wendy disappears during the battle with the robo-shark, but turns up alive and well later. It turns out the shark knocked her out during the fight and she was rescued and taken back to land by the gang's mysterious and, at that point, unidentified ally.]]


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* FeedItABomb: [[spoiler: The robo-shark in ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'' attacks Trip and he hurriedly gets out of the way, leaving Black Glove's latest transmitter, which is about to self-destruct in a ''very'' big way, in his place... so the shark swallows the bomb just before it goes off.]]


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* RoboticReveal: [[spoiler: The robo-shark in ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'' is revealed as a robot after it's blown to bits and they get a chance to examine the remains - specifically, Ray shows the others a piece of its skin, which turns out to have springs clinging to it and thread running through the backing. This is foreshadowed earlier in the event when the robo-shark passes by Wendy, who feels that it has ''smooth'' skin. As she knows, real shark skin is ''rough''.]]


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* ThreateningShark: One turns up when the gang is out at sea in ''Forever Begins Tomorrow'', looking for Black Glove's latest transmitter. [[spoiler: It turns out to be a robot made to look like a shark, sent to guard the transmitter.]]
22nd Jan '17 3:19:07 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* DoesNotLikeSpam: Wendy ''hates'' tofu and other "healthy foods" that her parents try to foist off on her.


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* NarrativeProfanityFilter: Wendy's specialty is microrobotics, which includes three talking dolls she's programmed as a three-part alarm clock. She's also programmed them to curse like sailors when they fall down, but the exact word is never used, instead being identified as "a word their owner's parents would prefer she not even knew" and similar things.
22nd Jan '17 2:57:53 PM AnoneMouseJr
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* DeusEstMachina: In ''The AI Gang'', the title characters are the children of superscientist working to create an Artificial Intelligence named ADAM. In the finale, ADAM wakes up. "He" starts talking to the protagonists and the villain, and by the end of the conversation, he's figured out how to create force-fields, disable all the nuclear weapons in the world, and the Unified Field Theory. He then sinks beneath the ocean, because he's not sure if humanity is ready for him.

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* BigBad: Black Glove, the top agent of G.H.O.S.T., is this for the whole series.
* BigEater: Wendy. It's said that hunger is almost a permanent condition with her.
* BizarreTasteInFood: Wendy's appetite is described as "remarkable at its best", and is said to have taken a turn for the bizarre in ''Robot Trouble'', though details (such as the contents of her "Megaburger") are not given.
* CompanionCube: Ray and his ever-present basketball.
* CreatingLifeIsBad: [[spoiler: Dr. Standish]] firmly believes in this and is fueled by outrage at the idea that humans would try to create a computer that can think.
* DeusEstMachina: In ''The AI Gang'', the The title characters are the children of superscientist working to create an Artificial Intelligence named ADAM. In the finale, ADAM wakes up. [[spoiler: "He" starts talking to the protagonists and the villain, and villain and, by the end of the conversation, he's figured out how to create force-fields, disable all the nuclear weapons in the world, and the Unified Field Theory. He then sinks beneath the ocean, because he's not sure if humanity is ready for him.]]



* MadBomber: The main antagonist of ''The A.I. Gang'' #1: ''Operation Sherlock'' is one, seeking to destroy the island and everyone on it to stop them from building a truly self-aware computer, considering the idea to be horrific. The trope name is even included on the back of the book.
* PungeonMaster: Paracelsus, the talking bronze head made by Roger and Rachel Phillips in ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. He includes "one of the best Conversation Simulators in the country", and Roger has a habit of sneaking new puns into his collection of pre-programmed responses. It gets to the point where one of their friends outright asks if they used old joke books to program him.
* WeaponizedExhaust: Attempted in the second book of ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. The title characters have built a rocket and are preparing to launch it; however, two separate spies break into it for their own reasons. One is discovered by two of the kids, whom he knocks out, ties up and leaves to be incinerated by the rocket's exhaust. The other is discovered by a third member of the gang, who is knocked out and left inside the rocket; her efforts to signal for help lead to the launch being aborted by the rest of the gang, saving all three lives.

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* FunWithAcronyms: G.H.O.S.T., said to be an acronym for "General Headquarters for Organized Strategic Terrorism". [[spoiler: It's really "General Headquarters for ''Oppose'' Strategic Terrorism".]]
* GadgeteerGenius: Somewhat downplayed version with Hap. He's a superb "nuts-and-bolts" type with a talent for putting things together, but none of his creations are ''too'' far out of the norm.
* HairTriggerTemper: Wendy is described as a "four-foot stick of dynamite with a two-inch fuse".
* HeightAngst: Ray Gammand is once mentioned as having "never forgiven his body for choosing his mother's genes for height instead of his father's" (Hugh Gammand is over seven feet tall). It doesn't help that he believes he needs to be taller in order to play basketball, which is his favorite sport.
* MadBomber: The main antagonist of ''The A.I. Gang'' Gang #1: ''Operation Operation Sherlock'' is one, seeking to destroy the island and everyone on it to stop them from building a truly self-aware computer, considering the idea to be horrific. The trope name is even included on the back of the book.
* MessOnAPlate: Wendy thinks of her mother's preferred meal of tofu and bean sprouts as this.
* PungeonMaster: Paracelsus, the talking bronze head made by Roger and Rachel Phillips in ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy.Phillips. He includes "one of the best Conversation Simulators in the country", and Roger has a habit of sneaking new puns into his collection of pre-programmed responses. It gets to the point where one of their friends outright asks if they used old joke books to program him.
* TheShortGuyWithGlasses: Ray Gammand, who wears glasses and isn't even five feet tall. He is highly annoyed by both traits.
* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Wendy loves burgers.
* TrashOfTheTitans: Wendy's room is a disaster area, which even her parents' household cleaning robot can't do a thing about.
* WeaponizedExhaust: Attempted in the second book of ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. ''Robot Trouble''. The title characters gang have built a rocket and are preparing to launch it; however, two separate spies break into it for their own reasons. One is discovered by two of the kids, whom he knocks out, ties up and leaves to be incinerated by the rocket's exhaust. The other is discovered by a third member of the gang, who is knocked out and left inside the rocket; her efforts to signal for help lead to the launch being aborted by the rest of the gang, saving all three lives.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: [[spoiler: G.H.O.S.T., the organization which seeks to seize power from the world governments that have filled the skies with military hardware, including nuclear missiles in space, can be considered this. So can their agent Black Glove, who actually succeeds in taking control of those weapons and intends to demand mankind's surrender, even if he has to blow up a city or two to prove he means business.]]
10th Jan '17 6:48:42 AM AnoneMouseJr
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* AdaptationExpansion: Coville has done this with three of his own short stories. (See ''Literature/TheMonstersOfMorleyManor'' for that book's details.)
** Every book in his ''Bruce Coville's Book Of...'' anthology series begins with one of his own stories. The first of these, ''My Little Brother Is a Monster'' (published in 1993), was expanded and adapted into the full-length book ''Always October'' in 2012.
** ''Clean As a Whistle'', first published in the 1994 anthology ''Oddly Enough'', was later expanded into a full-length book, ''Diary of a Mad Brownie'' (2015).
* BewareOfHitchhikingGhosts: In "The Ghost Let Go", Nina "Nine" Tanleven, her friend Chris Gurley, and Nine's father get in an accident because of what they initially suspect might be a hitchhiking ghost, with Nine and Chris theorizing that she caused them to crash rather than ask for a lift because the driver wasn't alone. The "ghost" later turns out to be the very much alive Dolores Smiley. Her mother is a ghost, who was accidentally struck and killed by a car almost identical to the Tanleven's (Dolores mistook their car for the one from long ago, which is why she ran out in front of them and caused their accident), and Dolores goes out every year on the anniversary of Mrs. Smiley's death, hoping she'll find her spirit wandering the road where she died so that she can finally apologize for the last, hateful words she ever said to her mother.

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* AdaptationExpansion: Coville has done this with three of his own short stories. (See ''Literature/TheMonstersOfMorleyManor'' for that book's details.)
** Every book in his ''Bruce Coville's Book Of...'' anthology series begins with one of his own stories. The first of these, ''My Little Brother Is a Monster'' (published in 1993), was expanded and adapted into the full-length book ''Always October'' in 2012.
** ''Clean As a Whistle'', first published in the 1994 anthology ''Oddly Enough'', was later expanded into a full-length book, ''Diary of a Mad Brownie'' (2015).
* BewareOfHitchhikingGhosts: In "The Ghost Let Go", Nina "Nine" Tanleven, her friend Chris Gurley, and Nine's father get in an accident because of what they initially suspect might be a hitchhiking ghost, with Nine and Chris theorizing that she caused them to crash rather than ask for a lift because the driver wasn't alone. The "ghost" later turns out to be the very much alive Dolores Smiley. Her mother is a ghost, who was accidentally struck and killed by a car almost identical to the Tanleven's (Dolores mistook their car for the one from long ago, which is why she ran out in front of them and caused their accident), and Dolores goes out every year on the anniversary of Mrs. Smiley's death, hoping she'll find her spirit wandering the road where she died so that she can finally apologize for the last, hateful words she ever said to her mother.



* CurseEscapeClause: One story features an inversion: a ghost of a seafarer who simply could not stop wandering the world, much to the annoyance of his wife. Since she was a witch, she put a curse on him, that his ghost would only rest once man had walked on the moon, and he was told about it. However, he's not in much of a hurry to move on, as he's found a young boy who's eager to hear his stories (and the boy's friend almost spills the beans before he knows that).
* DeadAllAlong: The protagonist of "The Thing in Auntie Alma's Pond" is terrified of her aunt's pond, but doesn't know why. Eventually she remembers that she was in a boating accident on the pond -- which she died in. Having at last faced up to the truth, she moves on into the afterlife.

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* CurseEscapeClause: One story features an inversion: a ghost NotSoImaginaryFriend: ''Diary of a seafarer Mad Brownie''. [[spoiler:Alex Carhart's little sister Destiny has an invisible friend, Herbert the Goblin, who simply could not stop wandering later supposedly disappears after her teacher tries to convince her he isn't real (angering Angus, the world, much to titular "mad Brownie"). Later on, when the annoyance of his wife. Since she was a witch, she put a curse on him, that his ghost would only rest once man had walked on protagonists (including said teacher) travel through the moon, Enchanted Realm, they meet Herbert and he was told about it. However, learn he's not a crewman on a ship there -- he met Destiny while he was on shore leave, and left with a promise to keep in much of a hurry to move on, as he's found a young boy who's eager to hear touch when his stories (and time was up.]]
* OurGoblinsAreDifferent: The goblins in ''Goblins in
the boy's friend almost spills Castle'' and the beans before he knows that).
* DeadAllAlong: The protagonist of
short story "The Thing Stinky Princess", while definitely weird, are mostly snarky and pragmatic, and tend to be a lot more decent than many human characters.
* SdrawkcabName: The ''Goblins'' series features goblins from the land of Nilbog.
* SolitarySorceress: The witch Granny Pinchbottom
in Auntie Alma's Pond" is terrified ''Goblins in the Castle''.
* TheVerse: Many
of her aunt's pond, but doesn't know why. Eventually she remembers that she was Coville's fantasy books take place in a boating accident the same universe, or at least the same multiverse. Mentions of the wizards Bellenmore and his apprentice Aaron link the worlds of ''Elives' Magic Shop'', ''The Unicorn Chronicles'', the ''Goblins'' duology and some of Coville's short stories (such as ''Wizard's Boy'' from ''Bruce Coville's Book of Magic''). In addition, the Author's notes in ''Goblins on the pond -- which she died in. Having at last faced up to Prowl'' confirm that his picture book ''The Foolish Giant'' is set in the truth, she moves on into same universe, while lines from the afterlife.book mentioning that their land is ruled by "Queen Wilhelmina", who had a bear for a friend many years ago, suggest that the series takes place in the same world as ''The Dragonslayers'' (a connection later confirmed via the guestbook of Coville's official website).

[[folder: The A.I. Gang]]



* DiscoveringYourOwnDeadBody: The protagonist of Coville's short story "The Thing in Auntie Alma's Pond" does this.



* EvilLawyerJoke: Downplayed version in the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, where Chris once remarks that her father says "You shouldn't believe anything you hear from a lawyer."
-->'''Nine''': "I thought your uncle was a lawyer."
-->'''Chris''' (laughing): "He's the reason my dad says that!"
* HasTwoMommies: The short story ''Duffy's Jacket'' has the title character and his cousins Andrew and Marie, whose mothers are sisters and raise the trio together, with no fathers in sight.
* IHaveManyNames: In ''Monster of the Year'', the Frankenstein monster has at least four names. According to Igor, the man who made the monster named him Sigmund, but used a brain from a man named Fred. So sometimes they call him Sigmund (or "Siggie" for short), sometimes they call him Fred, and sometimes they call him Sigmund Fred. But usually Igor doesn't call him anything, since it just upsets him.
-->'''Sigmund Fred''' (in response to the last part): "Just make sure you call me for dinner."
* IfICantHaveYou: In ''The Ghost in the Third Row'', the ghost was killed by a jealous lover after she chooses his rival over him.
* ImpossiblyDeliciousFood:
** "Biscuits of Glory" features biscuits that are "heavenly" in a near-literal sense. In a normal person, this causes levitation. [[spoiler:When given to a ghost, it "feels like it went to heaven," and is exorcised.]] This is ultimately a negative effect, because nothing else can compare to the taste of the biscuits.
** Also mentioned, jokingly, in ''The Ghost Wore Gray'': Nine suggests that Captain Jonathan Gray is hanging around as a ghost because he'd had one of the cook's pastries and decided he'd already made it to heaven.



* TheMaidenNameDebate: ''Monster of the Year'' has Michael [=McGraw=], whose mother (Elsa Adams) changed her name to her husband's when she got married, changed back after they divorced, and said she'd stay with her maiden name for the rest of her life. Michael, on the other hand, had his name changed to match his stepfather's. As he puts it, "This confuses outsiders, since they can't figure out who I really belong to, but it suits the three of us just fine."
* MarsWantsChocolate: In ''I Was a Sixth Grade Alien'', the aliens visiting Earth want to find a reason to establish friendly relations with us, but we don't have anything they actually particularly want. Until, that is, they discover peanut butter. Not because it's so delicious, but because it supercharges their romantic and sexual drives.
* MassiveNumberedSiblings: In the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, Nina's friend Chris Gurley is the only girl in a family of seven children, which doesn't amuse her - she complains that it's "like living with a football team".
* MonsterMash: ''Monster of the Year'' includes a Frankenstein's monster, a vampire, a gill man, a wolfman, a mummy, two hunchbacks (Quasimodo and Igor), a Godzilla expy, and a Phantom of the Opera in a "Blink-And-You'll-Miss-It" cameo.
* MoralGuardians: Myrna Smud, the antagonist of ''Monster of the Year''.

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* TheMaidenNameDebate: ''Monster PungeonMaster: Paracelsus, the talking bronze head made by Roger and Rachel Phillips in ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. He includes "one of the Year'' best Conversation Simulators in the country", and Roger has Michael [=McGraw=], whose mother (Elsa Adams) changed her name a habit of sneaking new puns into his collection of pre-programmed responses. It gets to her husband's when she got married, changed back after they divorced, and said she'd stay with her maiden name for the rest point where one of her life. Michael, on the other hand, had his name changed to match his stepfather's. As he puts it, "This confuses outsiders, since they can't figure out who I really belong to, but it suits the three of us just fine."
* MarsWantsChocolate: In ''I Was a Sixth Grade Alien'', the aliens visiting Earth want to find a reason to establish friendly relations with us, but we don't have anything they actually particularly want. Until, that is, they discover peanut butter. Not because it's so delicious, but because it supercharges
their romantic and sexual drives.
* MassiveNumberedSiblings: In the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, Nina's friend Chris Gurley is the only girl in a family of seven children, which doesn't amuse her - she complains that it's "like living with a football team".
friends outright asks if they used old joke books to program him.
* MonsterMash: ''Monster WeaponizedExhaust: Attempted in the second book of ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. The title characters have built a rocket and are preparing to launch it; however, two separate spies break into it for their own reasons. One is discovered by two of the Year'' includes a Frankenstein's monster, a vampire, a gill man, a wolfman, a mummy, two hunchbacks (Quasimodo kids, whom he knocks out, ties up and Igor), leaves to be incinerated by the rocket's exhaust. The other is discovered by a Godzilla expy, and a Phantom third member of the Opera in a "Blink-And-You'll-Miss-It" cameo.
* MoralGuardians: Myrna Smud,
gang, who is knocked out and left inside the antagonist of ''Monster rocket; her efforts to signal for help lead to the launch being aborted by the rest of the Year''. gang, saving all three lives.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Camp Haunted Hills]]



* NarrativeProfanityFilter:
** In ''The Ghost in the Third Row'', Nine and Chris are trapped in a very small, very dark room, and don't know what to do. Chris points out that "being picky won't get them anywhere." Nine tells the reader that "actually, that was the meaning of what she said. Her actual words would probably burn the page."
** ''The Ghost Wore Gray'' has Nine recall that Edgar Lonis, director of the play from the first book, once commented to her that one of the great secrets of acting was planting a seed in the audience's mind and then letting it grow. He then told her: "Your problem, Nine, is that once you plant the seed, you go overboard with the fertilizer." Except, Nine recalls, "He didn't say fertilizer".



* NotSoImaginaryFriend: ''Diary of a Mad Brownie''. [[spoiler:Alex Carhart's little sister Destiny has an invisible friend, Herbert the Goblin, who later supposedly disappears after her teacher tries to convince her he isn't real (angering Angus, the titular "mad Brownie"). Later on, when the protagonists (including said teacher) travel through the Enchanted Realm, they meet Herbert and learn he's a crewman on a ship there -- he met Destiny while he was on shore leave, and left with a promise to keep in touch when his time was up.]]
* OurGoblinsAreDifferent: The goblins in ''Goblins in the Castle'' and the short story "The Stinky Princess", while definitely weird, are mostly snarky and pragmatic, and tend to be a lot more decent than many human characters.
* PartingWordsRegret: "The Ghost Let Go" has a young woman whose last words to her mother were "I HATE YOU!", before [[spoiler:the mother and the girl's boyfriend (the cause of the argument) were killed in a car crash, while the girl was horribly disfigured]]. The regret at those words, and the fact that ghosts can't communicate with the living (except the protagonists), is what is causing them to stay, hence the title.
* PungeonMaster:
** Paracelsus, the talking bronze head made by Roger and Rachel Phillips in ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. He includes "one of the best Conversation Simulators in the country", and Roger has a habit of sneaking new puns into his collection of pre-programmed responses. It gets to the point where one of their friends outright asks if they used old joke books to program him.
** Kevver Smith in ''Monster of the Year'' makes them all the time. His friend Michael [=McGraw=] has learned to tune him out when he does so.
* PunnyName: Nina "Nine" Tanleven.



* SdrawkcabName: The ''Goblins'' series features goblins from the land of Nilbog.



* SolitarySorceress: The witch Granny Pinchbottom in ''Goblins in the Castle''.

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[[/folder]]

[[folder: I Was A Sixth Grade Alien]]

* SolitarySorceress: The witch Granny Pinchbottom in ''Goblins in MarsWantsChocolate: In ''I Was a Sixth Grade Alien'', the Castle''.aliens visiting Earth want to find a reason to establish friendly relations with us, but we don't have anything they actually particularly want. Until, that is, they discover peanut butter. Not because it's so delicious, but because it supercharges their romantic and sexual drives.



* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: Referenced in book 3 of the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, in which Nine's father, who restores old buildings for a living, decides that after years of being too busy, it's time for him to restore their own house, starting by stripping the old (and ugly) wallpaper from their stairwell and replacing it.

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* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: Referenced in book 3
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Monster
of the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, in which Nine's father, Year]]

* IHaveManyNames: In ''Monster of the Year'', the Frankenstein monster has at least four names. According to Igor, the man
who restores old buildings made the monster named him Sigmund, but used a brain from a man named Fred. So sometimes they call him Sigmund (or "Siggie" for a living, decides that short), sometimes they call him Fred, and sometimes they call him Sigmund Fred. But usually Igor doesn't call him anything, since it just upsets him.
-->'''Sigmund Fred''' (in response to the last part): "Just make sure you call me for dinner."
* TheMaidenNameDebate: ''Monster of the Year'' has Michael [=McGraw=], whose mother (Elsa Adams) changed her name to her husband's when she got married, changed back
after years of being too busy, it's time they divorced, and said she'd stay with her maiden name for the rest of her life. Michael, on the other hand, had his name changed to match his stepfather's. As he puts it, "This confuses outsiders, since they can't figure out who I really belong to, but it suits the three of us just fine."
* MonsterMash: ''Monster of the Year'' includes a Frankenstein's monster, a vampire, a gill man, a wolfman, a mummy, two hunchbacks (Quasimodo and Igor), a Godzilla expy, and a Phantom of the Opera in a "Blink-And-You'll-Miss-It" cameo.
* MoralGuardians: Myrna Smud, the antagonist of ''Monster of the Year''.
* PungeonMaster: Kevver Smith in ''Monster of the Year'' makes them all the time. His friend Michael [=McGraw=] has learned to tune
him to restore their own house, starting by stripping the old (and ugly) wallpaper from their stairwell and replacing it. out when he does so.



* TheVerse: Many of Coville's fantasy books take place in the same universe, or at least the same multiverse. Mentions of the wizards Bellenmore and his apprentice Aaron link the worlds of ''Elives' Magic Shop'', ''The Unicorn Chronicles'', the ''Goblins'' duology and some of Coville's short stories (such as ''Wizard's Boy'' from ''Bruce Coville's Book of Magic''). In addition, the Author's notes in ''Goblins on the Prowl'' confirm that his picture book ''The Foolish Giant'' is set in the same universe, while lines from the book mentioning that their land is ruled by "Queen Wilhelmina", who had a bear for a friend many years ago, suggest that the series takes place in the same world as ''The Dragonslayers'' (a connection later confirmed via the guestbook of Coville's official website).
* WeaponizedExhaust: Attempted in the second book of ''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. The title characters have built a rocket and are preparing to launch it; however, two separate spies break into it for their own reasons. One is discovered by two of the kids, whom he knocks out, ties up and leaves to be incinerated by the rocket's exhaust. The other is discovered by a third member of the gang, who is knocked out and left inside the rocket; her efforts to signal for help lead to the launch being aborted by the rest of the gang, saving all three lives.

to:


[[/folder]]

[[folder: Nina Tanleven]]

* TheVerse: Many BewareOfHitchhikingGhosts: In "The Ghost Let Go", Nina "Nine" Tanleven, her friend Chris Gurley, and Nine's father get in an accident because of Coville's fantasy books take place what they initially suspect might be a hitchhiking ghost, with Nine and Chris theorizing that she caused them to crash rather than ask for a lift because the driver wasn't alone. The "ghost" later turns out to be the very much alive Dolores Smiley. Her mother is a ghost, who was accidentally struck and killed by a car almost identical to the Tanleven's (Dolores mistook their car for the one from long ago, which is why she ran out in front of them and caused their accident), and Dolores goes out every year on the anniversary of Mrs. Smiley's death, hoping she'll find her spirit wandering the road where she died so that she can finally apologize for the last, hateful words she ever said to her mother.
* EvilLawyerJoke: Downplayed version
in the same universe, or at least ''Nina Tanleven'' series, where Chris once remarks that her father says "You shouldn't believe anything you hear from a lawyer."
-->'''Nine''': "I thought your uncle was a lawyer."
-->'''Chris''' (laughing): "He's
the same multiverse. Mentions of the wizards Bellenmore and his apprentice Aaron link the worlds of ''Elives' Magic Shop'', reason my dad says that!"
* IfICantHaveYou: In
''The Unicorn Chronicles'', Ghost in the ''Goblins'' duology and some of Coville's short stories (such as ''Wizard's Boy'' from ''Bruce Coville's Book of Magic''). In addition, Third Row'', the Author's notes in ''Goblins on the Prowl'' confirm that ghost was killed by a jealous lover after she chooses his picture book rival over him.
* ImpossiblyDeliciousFood: Mentioned, jokingly, in
''The Foolish Giant'' is set in the same universe, while lines from the book mentioning Ghost Wore Gray'': Nine suggests that their land Captain Jonathan Gray is ruled by "Queen Wilhelmina", who hanging around as a ghost because he'd had a bear for a friend many years ago, suggest that one of the series takes place in the same world as ''The Dragonslayers'' (a connection later confirmed via the guestbook of Coville's official website).cook's pastries and decided he'd already made it to heaven.
* WeaponizedExhaust: Attempted in MassiveNumberedSiblings: In the second book ''Nina Tanleven'' series, Nina's friend Chris Gurley is the only girl in a family of seven children, which doesn't amuse her - she complains that it's "like living with a football team".
* NarrativeProfanityFilter:
** In
''The A.I. Gang'' trilogy. Ghost in the Third Row'', Nine and Chris are trapped in a very small, very dark room, and don't know what to do. Chris points out that "being picky won't get them anywhere." Nine tells the reader that "actually, that was the meaning of what she said. Her actual words would probably burn the page."
** ''The Ghost Wore Gray'' has Nine recall that Edgar Lonis, director of the play from the first book, once commented to her that one of the great secrets of acting was planting a seed in the audience's mind and then letting it grow. He then told her: "Your problem, Nine, is that once you plant the seed, you go overboard with the fertilizer." Except, Nine recalls, "He didn't say fertilizer".
* PartingWordsRegret: "The Ghost Let Go" has a young woman whose last words to her mother were "I HATE YOU!", before [[spoiler:the mother and the girl's boyfriend (the cause of the argument) were killed in a car crash, while the girl was horribly disfigured]].
The title characters have built a rocket regret at those words, and are preparing the fact that ghosts can't communicate with the living (except the protagonists), is what is causing them to launch it; however, two separate spies break into it stay, hence the title.
* PunnyName: Nina "Nine" Tanleven.
* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: Referenced in book 3 of the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, in which Nine's father, who restores old buildings
for a living, decides that after years of being too busy, it's time for him to restore their own reasons. One is discovered house, starting by two of stripping the kids, whom he knocks out, ties up old (and ugly) wallpaper from their stairwell and leaves to be incinerated by the rocket's exhaust. The other is discovered by a third member of the gang, who is knocked out and left inside the rocket; her efforts to signal for help lead to the launch being aborted by the rest of the gang, saving all three lives.replacing it.


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[[/folder]]

[[folder: Short stories]]

* AdaptationExpansion: Three of Coville's short stories have been expanded into full books by Coville himself.
** ''My Little Brother Is a Monster'' (published in 1993 in ''Bruce Coville's Book of Monsters'') was expanded and adapted into ''Always October'' in 2012.
** ''Clean As a Whistle'' (first published in the 1994 anthology ''Oddly Enough'') was expanded and adapted into ''Diary of a Mad Brownie'' (2015).
** The five-part ''The Monsters of Morley Manor'' was expanded into ''Literature/TheMonstersOfMorleyManor''.
* DeadAllAlong: The protagonist of "The Thing in Auntie Alma's Pond" is terrified of her aunt's pond, but doesn't know why. Eventually she remembers that she was in a boating accident on the pond -- which she died in. Having at last faced up to the truth, she moves on into the afterlife.
* DiscoveringYourOwnDeadBody: The protagonist of Coville's short story "The Thing in Auntie Alma's Pond" does this.
* HasTwoMommies: The short story ''Duffy's Jacket'' has the title character and his cousins Andrew and Marie, whose mothers are sisters and raise the trio together, with no fathers in sight.
* ImpossiblyDeliciousFood: "Biscuits of Glory" features biscuits that are "heavenly" in a near-literal sense. In a normal person, this causes levitation. [[spoiler:When given to a ghost, it "feels like it went to heaven," and is exorcised.]] This is ultimately a negative effect, because nothing else can compare to the taste of the biscuits.

[[/folder]]
10th Jan '17 6:29:37 AM AnoneMouseJr
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* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: Referenced in book 3 of the ''Nina Tanleven'' series, in which Nine's father, who restores old buildings for a living, decides that after years of being too busy, it's time for him to restore their own house, starting by stripping the old (and ugly) wallpaper from their stairwell and replacing it.
27th Dec '16 12:12:02 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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!!!''Magic Shop''

to:

!!!''Magic Shop''!!!''Literature/MagicShop''



* ''[[Literature/MagicShop The Monster's Ring]]'' (1989; revised 2002)

to:

* ''[[Literature/MagicShop The ''The Monster's Ring]]'' Ring'' (1989; revised 2002)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.BruceCoville