History Creator / BrianWAldiss

14th Feb '17 12:00:09 PM Kitchen90
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Brian W. Aldiss is a British author, primarily of ScienceFiction, although he's also written general fiction, and some non-fiction. His early works, from TheFifties, generally had a more literary bent than the typical SF of that era, and in the TheSixties, he joined the NewWaveScienceFiction movement, which promoted more experimental and literary forms of SF. His experimental novel, ''Barefoot in the Head'', is a fairly extreme example. He went on to write a wide variety of SF. His best-known work is probably the ''Literature/{{Helliconia}}'' series.

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[[quoteright:262:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/brianaldiss.jpg]]

Brian W. Aldiss [[KnightFever OBE]] (born 18 August 1925) is a British author, primarily of ScienceFiction, although he's also written general fiction, and some non-fiction. His early works, from TheFifties, generally had a more literary bent than the typical SF of that era, and in the TheSixties, he joined the NewWaveScienceFiction movement, which promoted more experimental and literary forms of SF. His experimental novel, ''Barefoot in the Head'', is a fairly extreme example. He went on to write a wide variety of SF. His best-known work is probably the ''Literature/{{Helliconia}}'' series.
28th Jan '16 6:09:53 PM PaulA
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He was given a SFWAGrandMasterAward in 2000.

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He was given a SFWAGrandMasterAward [[UsefulNotes/DamonKnightMemorialGrandMasterAward SFWA Grand Master Award]] in 2000.
30th Dec '15 2:12:26 PM Konczewski
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* GenerationShips: In ''Literature/NonStop'': A plague on a generation ship reduces the passengers to barbarism: they lose all idea of who they are or even what a spaceship ''is''. The bioengineered plants go into overdrive, turning the ship into a jungle, increasing the sense of obscuration and isolation. The reader's first clue as to what's going on is when the jungle turns out to have bulkheads.

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* GenerationShips: In ''Literature/NonStop'': A ''Literature/NonStop'', a plague on a generation ship reduces the passengers to barbarism: barbarism, and they lose all idea of who they are or even what a spaceship ''is''. The bioengineered plants go into overdrive, turning the ship into a jungle, increasing the sense of obscuration and isolation. The reader's first clue as to what's going on is when the jungle turns out to have bulkheads.
22nd Dec '15 10:34:53 AM JCCyC
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Added DiffLines:

* CorruptCorporateExecutive: The narrator in the short story ''I.I.I.''


Added DiffLines:

* HumansAreTheRealMonsters: In ''I.I.I.'', the titular MegaCorp [[TakeOverTheWorld takes over all of Earth's resources]] and proceeds to RapePillageAndBurn the entire [[ApocalypseHow Universe]].
17th Aug '15 12:52:46 PM Materioptikon
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Added DiffLines:

* HostileTerraforming: ''The Saliva Tree''.
17th Feb '15 3:14:57 PM SeptimusHeap
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* ''{{Literature/Non-Stop}}'' (1958, US title: ''Starship'')

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* ''{{Literature/Non-Stop}}'' ''Literature/NonStop'' (1958, US title: ''Starship'')



* CityInABottle: ''Non-Stop'' is based on [[GenerationShips this concept]], but with some gleefully British plot twists.

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* CityInABottle: ''Non-Stop'' ''Literature/NonStop'' is based on [[GenerationShips this concept]], but with some gleefully British plot twists.



* GenerationShips: In ''Non-Stop'': A plague on a generation ship reduces the passengers to barbarism: they lose all idea of who they are or even what a spaceship ''is''. The bioengineered plants go into overdrive, turning the ship into a jungle, increasing the sense of obscuration and isolation. The reader's first clue as to what's going on is when the jungle turns out to have bulkheads.

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* GenerationShips: In ''Non-Stop'': ''Literature/NonStop'': A plague on a generation ship reduces the passengers to barbarism: they lose all idea of who they are or even what a spaceship ''is''. The bioengineered plants go into overdrive, turning the ship into a jungle, increasing the sense of obscuration and isolation. The reader's first clue as to what's going on is when the jungle turns out to have bulkheads.



* GossipyHens: In ''Non-Stop'', Roy encounters a group of Gossipy Hens in Quarters. The fragmented bits of sniping he overhears are part of a breakthrough he has regarding the inward-turned and purposeless nature of his community and his need to go on his [[TheHerosJourney Hero's Journey]].

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* GossipyHens: In ''Non-Stop'', ''Literature/NonStop'', Roy encounters a group of Gossipy Hens in Quarters. The fragmented bits of sniping he overhears are part of a breakthrough he has regarding the inward-turned and purposeless nature of his community and his need to go on his [[TheHerosJourney Hero's Journey]].
17th Feb '15 1:13:25 PM pablodf
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* ''{{Literature/Non-Stop}}'' (1958, US title: ''Starship'')



* ''Non-Stop'' (1958, US title: ''Starship'')
21st May '14 7:37:53 AM IncarnadineZebra
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* "[[Literature/DangerousVisions The Night that All Hell Broke Out]]"

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* "[[Literature/DangerousVisions The Night that All Hell Time Broke Out]]"
19th Apr '14 9:10:31 PM LeeM
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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: ''Report on Probability A'' appears to be based almost exclusively on this trope, to the point of unreadability. The description in Wikipedia says: "The bulk of the book is the Report, describing in minute, obsessive and often repetitive detail, three characters G, S, and C as they secretly watch a house, each from a separate outbuilding with peripheral views of the house's windows, catching occasional glimpses of its occupant, Mrs Mary. As the Report is being read by a character called "Domoladossa'", he is secretly being observed from other universes, and these observers in their turn are being observed, all of them engaged in futile speculation about the exact nature of Probability A, and the exact meaning of the Victorian painting, The Hireling Shepherd (by Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt..." (and so on).

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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: ''Report on Probability A'' appears to be based almost exclusively on this trope, to the point of unreadability. The description in Wikipedia says: "The bulk of the book is the Report, describing in minute, obsessive and often repetitive detail, three characters G, S, and C as they secretly watch a house, each from a separate outbuilding with peripheral views of the house's windows, catching occasional glimpses of its occupant, Mrs Mary. As the Report is being read by a character called "Domoladossa'", he is secretly being observed from other universes, and these observers in their turn are being observed, all of them engaged in futile speculation about the exact nature of Probability A, and the exact meaning of the Victorian painting, The Hireling Shepherd (by Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt...Hunt)..." (and so on).



** In the US the publisher ruined the spoiler by naming the book ''[[SpoilerTitle Starship]]''.



* SdrawkcabName: In his illustrated poem "Pile", (subtitle "Petals from St. Klaed's Computer") the hero escapes from Pile and it's computer "St. Klaed" to find the alternate world of Elip run by St. Dealk.

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* SdrawkcabName: In his illustrated poem "Pile", (subtitle "Petals from St. Klaed's Computer") the hero escapes from Pile and it's its computer "St. Klaed" to find the alternate world of Elip run by St. Dealk.
23rd May '13 10:44:04 AM Angeldeb82
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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: ''Report on Probability A'' appears to be based almost exclusively on this trope, to the point of unreadability. The description in Wikipedia says: "The bulk of the book is the Report, describing in minute, obsessive and often repetitive detail, three characters G, S, and C as they secretly watch a house, each from a separate outbuilding with peripheral views of the house's windows, catching occasional glimpses of its occupant, Mrs Mary. As the Report is being read by a character called "Domoladossa'", he is secretly being observed from other universes, and these observers in their turn are being observed, all of them engaged in futile speculation about the exact nature of Probability A, and the exact meaning of the Victorian painting, The Hireling Shepherd (by Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt..." (and so on).



* {{Redundancy}}: ''Report on Probability A'' appears to be based almost exclusively on this trope, to the point of unreadability. The description in Wikipedia says: "The bulk of the book is the Report, describing in minute, obsessive and often repetitive detail, three characters G, S, and C as they secretly watch a house, each from a separate outbuilding with peripheral views of the house's windows, catching occasional glimpses of its occupant, Mrs Mary. As the Report is being read by a character called "Domoladossa'", he is secretly being observed from other universes, and these observers in their turn are being observed, all of them engaged in futile speculation about the exact nature of Probability A, and the exact meaning of the Victorian painting, The Hireling Shepherd (by Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt..." (and so on).
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