History Creator / BillBryson

22nd Jun '16 5:38:49 PM Geoduck
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* ''The Road to Little Dribbling'' (2015)
15th Apr '16 3:22:23 PM Geoduck
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* TakeThat: Frequent, and not at all subtle. See the page quote above.

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* TakeThat: Frequent, and not at all subtle. See the page quote above. His passionate views on British land and historical conservation have attracted some return fire, one of the more prominent examples coming from James May on an episode of Series/TopGear.
15th Apr '16 2:33:40 PM Geoduck
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* TechnologyMarchesOn: The Gizmo-crazy hiker in ''Walk In The Woods'' is kitted out with technology that was advanced in 1997 (GPS, self-pitching tent) but is fairly standard fare now.
15th Apr '16 2:32:39 PM Geoduck
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* AuthorExistenceFailure: His old friend and frequent correspondent in Australia died just before he was due to visit her while writing ''Down Under'' so he offers a humorous tale she once told him as a tribute.



* BeamMeUpScotty: In ''Notes From a Big Country'' (which is a collection of UK newspaper columns about life in the States) he falls heavily for a popular misquote of Mariah Carey.



** And overcharging for stuff.



* CreatorBreakdown: Bryson believes that if ever Shakespeare's own voice appears in his work it is in ''King John'', written after Shakespeare's son Hamnet died: "Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form."



* ScienceMarchesOn: The march of science itself is the subject of ''A Short History Of Nearly Everything''.
** In that book he hopes that Pluto will continue to be a planet. Yeah, not anymore. Especially interesting is the book was written as New Horizons was ''leaving'' for Pluto.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: The aforementioned ''Lost Continent;'' and ''A Walk in the Woods''. ''Notes from a Big Country'' mostly because it deals with a mid-[[TheNineties 90's]] world just before the internet and cellphones became ubiquitous- Bryson mentions the difficulty of finding change for a payphone at the airport, the amount of mail order catalogues he's sent, sending faxes to the UK, and renting movies on videotape. At the same time, he writes during the very peak of sedentary, suburban, automobile-centric living in America.
26th Mar '16 12:37:51 PM MarkLungo
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* CricketRules: He has mentioned at one point that, to an American, any cricket fan's description of a match or its rules might as well be completely made-up, for how ludicrous it sounds.

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* CricketRules: UsefulNotes/CricketRules: He has mentioned at one point that, to an American, any cricket UsefulNotes/{{cricket}} fan's description of a match or its rules might as well be completely made-up, for how ludicrous it sounds.
1st Feb '16 9:53:19 AM pittsburghmuggle
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* [[UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Cleveland Rocks]]



* DeadpanSnarker

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* %%* DeadpanSnarker
1st Feb '16 9:41:25 AM pittsburghmuggle
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* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In ''The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got That Way'' Bryson brings up how in the 1970's Robert Burchfield claimed that eventually American and British English would eventually become different languages. In 1990, when ''Mother Tongue'' was written, neither no one could have predicted the rise of broadband Internet allowing us to talk to each other, play games together, read each others writing, and watch each others movies - it makes for a very interesting look back.

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* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In ''The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got That Way'' Bryson brings up how in the 1970's Robert Burchfield claimed that eventually American and British English would eventually become different languages. In 1990, when ''Mother Tongue'' was written, neither no one could have predicted the rise of broadband Internet allowing us to talk to each other, play games together, read each others writing, and watch each others movies - it makes for a very interesting look back.
1st Feb '16 9:40:59 AM pittsburghmuggle
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* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In ''The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got That Way'' brings up how Robert Burchfield claimed that eventually American and British English would eventually seperate. In 1990, neither Bryson nor Burchfield could have predicted the rise of the Internet allowing us to talk to each other, play games together, read each others writing, and watch each other's movies makes it a very interesting look back.

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* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In ''The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got That Way'' Bryson brings up how in the 1970's Robert Burchfield claimed that eventually American and British English would eventually seperate. become different languages. In 1990, when ''Mother Tongue'' was written, neither Bryson nor Burchfield no one could have predicted the rise of the broadband Internet allowing us to talk to each other, play games together, read each others writing, and watch each other's others movies - it makes it for a very interesting look back.
1st Feb '16 9:36:53 AM pittsburghmuggle
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Added DiffLines:

* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In ''The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got That Way'' brings up how Robert Burchfield claimed that eventually American and British English would eventually seperate. In 1990, neither Bryson nor Burchfield could have predicted the rise of the Internet allowing us to talk to each other, play games together, read each others writing, and watch each other's movies makes it a very interesting look back.
-->"''The complexities of the English Language are such that even native speakers cannot always communicate effectively, as almost every American learns on his first day in Britain. Indeed, Robert Burchfield, editor of the'' Oxford English Dictionary, ''created a stir in linguistic circles on both sides of the Atlantic when he announced his belief that American English and English English are drifting apart so rapidly that within 200 years the two nations won't be able to understand each other at all.''"
31st Jan '16 5:57:49 PM pittsburghmuggle
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** In that book he hopes that Pluto will continue to be a planet. Yeah, not anymore.

to:

** In that book he hopes that Pluto will continue to be a planet. Yeah, not anymore. Especially interesting is the book was written as New Horizons was ''leaving'' for Pluto.
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