History Creator / AnthonyPrice

6th Jan '16 10:22:46 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DecoyProtagonist: In the prequel ''The Hour of the Donkey'', Audley's father is introduced within the first few pages, demonstrating a family resemblance in attitude and intelligence. He is killed off before he gets a chance to learn about the main plot, and the usual Audley role is played by another character, who is identified as a previously-unnamed mentor the younger Audley recalls in one of the novels it's a prequel to.

to:

* DecoyProtagonist: In the prequel ''The Hour of the Donkey'', Audley's father Nigel Audley, David's father, is introduced within the first few pages, demonstrating a family resemblance in attitude and intelligence. He is killed off before he gets a chance to learn about the main plot, and the usual Audley role is played by another character, who is identified as a previously-unnamed mentor the younger Audley recalls in one of the novels it's a prequel to.



* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is set during the German invasion of France, and features Audley's father and one of his mentors. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together. ''Soldier No More'' covers Audley's recruitment into the newly-formed Department of Research and Development.

to:

* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is set during the German invasion of France, and features Audley's father and one of his mentors. ''The '44 Vintage'' is set during the Allied re-taking of France, and recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together. ''Soldier No More'' is set in the aftermath of the Suez Crisis, and covers Audley's recruitment into the newly-formed Department of Research and Development.


Added DiffLines:

* ReclusiveArtist: In-universe in ''Soldier No More'', there's Antonia Palfrey, author of the trashy but bestselling historical novel ''Princess in the Sunset'', who never makes public appearances and rarely meets in person with anyone except her lawyer and agent. [[spoiler:"Antonia Palfrey" is actually David Audley, who wrote the novel because he needed the money, but wants to keep his reputation as a serious historian intact]].


Added DiffLines:

* SuspiciousSpending: In ''Soldier No More'', a subplot involves the mystery of where Audley is getting the money to perform extensive renovations on his ancestral home. [[spoiler:It turns out he's secretly the author of a trashy but bestselling historical novel mentioned in passing at several points in the story]].
6th Jan '16 6:09:02 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Soldier No More'' (1981)

to:

* ''Soldier No More'' (1981)(1981) (Roche) (a prequel set in 1957)



* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is set during the German invasion of France, and features Audley's father and one of his mentors. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together.

to:

* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is set during the German invasion of France, and features Audley's father and one of his mentors. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together. ''Soldier No More'' covers Audley's recruitment into the newly-formed Department of Research and Development.
5th Jan '16 7:21:58 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BilingualBonus: In ''The Hour of the Donkey'', set during the German invasion of France early in World War II, the protagonist doesn't speak either French or German, so whenever he hears someone speaking in one of those languages, it's presented without translation. Thus, a reader who does know one or both of those languages will frequently have more idea what's going on than the protagonist does.
5th Jan '16 7:37:19 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The Hour of the Donkey'' (1980)

to:

* ''The Hour of the Donkey'' (1980)(1980) (Bastable) (a prequel set in 1940)



* CallForward: In ''Tomorrow's Ghost'', Frances Fitzgibbon is helped toward the solution of the mystery by a saying that she recalls hearing from Audley, which he attributed to one of his old teachers. The next published novel, ''The Hour of the Donkey'', is a prequel set forty years earlier, in which the teacher appears as a character and at one point applies the same saying.



* CowardlyLion: Harry Bastable spends much of ''The Hour of the Donkey'' berating himself for cowardice, and is convinced that his successes are entirely down to luck and the support of his more capable colleague Willis. He's bemused when Willis admits to feeling much the same way with their respective positions reversed.



* DecoyProtagonist: In the prequel ''The Hour of the Donkey'', Audley's father is introduced within the first few pages, demonstrating a family resemblance in attitude and intelligence. He is killed off before he gets a chance to learn about the main plot, and the usual Audley role is played by another character, who is identified as a previously-unnamed mentor the younger Audley recalls in one of the novels it's a prequel to.



* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together.

to:

* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is set during the German invasion of France, and features Audley's father and one of his mentors. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together.
4th Jan '16 7:13:19 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The '44 Vintage'' (1978)
* ''Tomorrow's Ghost'' (1979)

to:

* ''The '44 Vintage'' (1978)
(1978) (Butler) (a prequel set in 1944)
* ''Tomorrow's Ghost'' (1979)(1979) (Fitzgibbon)



* InWhichATropeIsDescribed: ''The '44 Vintage'' has chapter titles like "How Corporal Butler Was Saved By His Boots" and "How the Germans Spoilt a Good Plan".
* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: In ''Tomorrow's Ghost'', there is a folk tale that is reputed to be a harbinger of death whenever it is told. It is told twice in the course of the novel, and each time a death follows on cue. But it could, of course, just be a coincidence.



* {{Prequel}}: Although most of the books are set around the date of publication, ''The '44 Vintage'' and ''The Hour of the Donkey'' are set during World War II, and ''Soldier No More'' during the 1950s. ''The '44 Vintage'' recounts the meeting of Second Lieutenant Audley and Corporal Butler and the first time they worked together.




to:

* WorthlessTreasureTwist: In ''The '44 Vintage'', several groups with conflicting aims fight it out over a MacGuffin but it all turns out to be for nothing, because [[spoiler:the hiding place in which it had been stashed several years earlier flooded every winter, ruining the paper and rendering the MacGuffin illegible]].
27th Jun '15 7:24:36 AM Gillimer
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* OrgyOfEvidence: Inverted in ''The War Game''. Red Charlie has thousands of witnesses that he was in another part of the battleground at the time of the murder. He is so ostentatiously innocent that clearly he must be guilty.
16th Nov '14 8:59:57 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:


[[folder:Novels in the series]]
*''The Labyrinth Makers'' (1970) (Audley)
*''The Alamut Ambush'' (1971) (Roskill)
*''Colonel Butler's Wolf'' (1972) (Butler)
*''October Men'' (1973) (Richardson, Boselli)
*''Other Paths to Glory'' (1974) (Mitchell)
*''Our Man in Camelot'' (1975) (Mosby)
*''War Game'' (1976) UK (Audley)
*''The '44 Vintage'' (1978)
*''Tomorrow's Ghost'' (1979)
*''The Hour of the Donkey'' (1980)
*''Soldier No More'' (1981)
*''The Old Vengeful'' (1982)
*''Gunner Kelly'' (1983)
*''Sion Crossing'' (1984) (Latimer)
*''Here Be Monsters'' (1985)
*''For the Good of the State'' (1986)
*''A New Kind of War'' (1987)
*''A Prospect of Vengeance'' (1988)
*''The Memory Trap'' (1989)
[[/folder]]
15th Nov '14 9:08:26 PM Micah
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* HistoricalInJoke: ''The Hour of the Donkey'' is all about providing a plausible explanation for the Germans' inability to stop the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.
15th Oct '13 11:38:26 AM Gillimer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The central character of the novels is Dr David Audley, historian (specialising in the Middle East) turned analyst for an unnamed branch of the British secret service. He is not usually the point-of-view character, however; after the first novel, ''The Labyrinth Makers'', the point of view passes around among his colleagues, with the result that by the end of the series the reader has seen most of the recurring cast from the inside as well as multiple external viewpoints. It also means that in most of the novels Audley gets to indulge his famously irritating tendency to be one step ahead of everybody else and refuse to tell anyone what's going on, without ruining the suspense for the reader.

to:

The central character of the novels is Dr David Audley, historian (specialising in the Middle East) turned analyst for an unnamed branch a hush-hush counter-espionage Department of the British secret service. Ministry of Defence, camouflaged as "Research and Development". (The "research" they do is into KGB activities.) He is not usually the point-of-view character, however; after the first novel, ''The Labyrinth Makers'', the point of view passes around among his colleagues, with the result that by the end of the series the reader has seen most of the recurring cast from the inside as well as multiple external viewpoints. It also means that in most of the novels Audley gets to indulge his famously irritating tendency to be one step ahead of everybody else and refuse to tell anyone what's going on, without ruining the suspense for the reader.
19th Dec '12 6:19:55 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* FieryCoverup: The bad guys attempt one in ''Other Paths to Glory'', but don't carry it off well enough to prevent the firefighters recognising it for what it is.
This list shows the last 10 events of 11. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AnthonyPrice