History Creator / AlfredHitchcock

19th Mar '17 3:24:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/TornCurtain'' (1966) – Michael Armstrong (PaulNewman), an esteemed American rocket scientist, defects to EastGermany. Sarah Sherman (JulieAndrews), his assistant and fiancée, reluctantly follows him. Armstrong is actually a FakeDefector, but the Stasi is determined to keep him within the East German borders. Has a scene that realistically proves how difficult it actually is to murder someone.

to:

* ''Film/TornCurtain'' (1966) – Michael Armstrong (PaulNewman), (Creator/PaulNewman), an esteemed American rocket scientist, defects to EastGermany. Sarah Sherman (JulieAndrews), (Creator/JulieAndrews), his assistant and fiancée, reluctantly follows him. Armstrong is actually a FakeDefector, but the Stasi is determined to keep him within the East German borders. Has a scene that realistically proves how difficult it actually is to murder someone.
18th Mar '17 7:49:25 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BaitAndSwitch: It's reasonable to say that Hitchcock pulled off this trope on a meta level that would impact cinema forever; prior to 1960, audiences were used to Hitch's style of building mystery and suspense with films like Vertigo and North By Northwest, as well as his TV series. Then Psycho came out, and the first act of that movie was true to his usual style. Then Janet Leigh takes her shower...and a whole new genre of horror is born - the slasher film. Unless viewers had read the book, ''nobody'' saw it coming.

to:

* BaitAndSwitch: It's reasonable to say that Hitchcock pulled off this trope on a meta level that would impact cinema forever; prior to 1960, audiences were used to Hitch's style of building mystery and suspense with films like Vertigo ''Rear Window, Strangers on a Train, Vertigo'' and North ''North By Northwest, Northwest'', as well as his TV series. Then Psycho ''Psycho'' came out, and the first act of that movie was true to his usual style. Then Janet Leigh takes her shower...and a whole new genre of horror is born - the slasher film. Unless viewers A portion of the audience who had read the book, ''nobody'' saw book might have seen it coming.coming but the vast majority of the audience, both in America and the world was totally shocked and unprepared for it.



** James Stewart said in interviews that during film-making, Hitchcock would actually shoot the breeze with actors about restaurants, wines, recipes and other stuff to try out, and [[CasualDangerDialogue almost never discuss the film or the scene they were working on]].
** Biographers note that Hitchcock did work out and exercise and his weight actually fluctuated between projects. Most famously, in the film ''Film/{{Lifeboat}}'' his CreatorCameo is a Before/After photo of himself in a newspaper with and without weight. This was no joke, Hitch really did slim down between film-making and used the cameo to prove that he ''can'' slim down when he chooses to or needs to.



* DepravedHomosexual: Mrs. Danvers in ''Literature/{{Rebecca}}'', the Leopold and Loeb stand-ins in ''Film/{{Rope}}'', Bruno in ''Film/StrangersOnATrain'', and Martin Landau's character in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.

to:

* DepravedHomosexual: Mrs. Danvers in ''Literature/{{Rebecca}}'', the Leopold and Loeb stand-ins in ''Film/{{Rope}}'', Bruno in ''Film/StrangersOnATrain'', and Martin Landau's character in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''. Of course, Hitchcock added this to make his villains more complex and interesting rather than out of homophobia.



** From the 50s onwards, Hitchcock's films featured blondes as heroines (Creator/GraceKelly, Eva Marie Saint, Kim Novak, Janet Leigh or Tippi Hedren). The movies he made in the 30s and 40s generally featured brunettes and dark haired actresses (Joan Fontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Theresa Wright, Sylvia Sidney among others).
** Interestingly, Hitchcock also had a "type" of heroes - they were mostly tall and thin (to the point of being lanky) and often had an air of youthfulness or vulnerability. Examples are Creator/MichaelRedgrave in ''Film/TheLadyVanishes'', Creator/GregoryPeck in ''Film/{{Spellbound}}'', Creator/JamesStewart in any of his four Hitchcock movies, and, of course, Anthony Perkins in ''Film/{{Psycho}}''.

to:

** From the 50s onwards, Hitchcock's films featured blondes as heroines (Creator/GraceKelly, Eva Marie Saint, Kim Novak, Janet Leigh or Tippi Hedren). The movies he made in the 30s and 40s generally featured brunettes and dark haired actresses (Joan Fontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Theresa Wright, Sylvia Sidney among others).
others). In general, Hitchcock's heroines tend to be either cold, elegant and shrewd (Grace Kelly, Eva Marie Saint), or otherwise deeply troubled, neurotic, suffering from {{Angst}} or DarkAndTroubledPast (Ingrid Bergman, Joan Fontaine, Tippi Hedren in ''Marnie'').
** Interestingly, Hitchcock also had a "type" of heroes - they were mostly tall and thin (to the point of being lanky) and often had an air of youthfulness or vulnerability. Examples are Creator/MichaelRedgrave in ''Film/TheLadyVanishes'', Creator/GregoryPeck in ''Film/{{Spellbound}}'', Creator/JamesStewart in any of his four Hitchcock movies, and, of course, Anthony Perkins in ''Film/{{Psycho}}''.''Film/{{Psycho}}'' where he inverts this trope in a dark and horrific fashion.



* PoliceAreUseless: A traumatic childhood incident when his father used the local police to teach him a lesson worthy of [[Series/ArrestedDevelopment J. Walter Wetherman]] caused him to enact revenge in all his films. Though ''Film/DialMForMurder'' and ''Film/{{Frenzy}}'' are notable exceptions.

to:

* PoliceAreUseless: A traumatic childhood incident when his father used the local police to teach him a lesson worthy of [[Series/ArrestedDevelopment J. Walter Wetherman]] caused him to enact revenge in all his films. Though ''Film/DialMForMurder'' and ''Film/{{Frenzy}}'' are notable exceptions.exceptions as are ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' and ''Film/{{Marnie}}'' where the protagonists who run away from the police ''are'' guilty. More or less, he liked making police useless to ratchet the suspense for his leads, since if they are innocent men wrongly accused, then that makes them vulnerable and makes their fears more believable and relatable to the audience.



* SilenceIsGolden: Even movies Hitchcock directed after the silent era occasionally manage to create drama without dialogue. Hitchcock was a painter and was very interested in visuals, almost to the point of expressing disdain for acting and dialogue.

to:

* SilenceIsGolden: Even movies Hitchcock directed after the silent era occasionally manage to create drama without dialogue. Hitchcock was a painter Long stretches of ''Vertigo'' and was very interested ''Psycho'' involve observing characters go about their work and behaviour, such as when Scottie is tailing Madeline in visuals, almost the early part of ''Vertigo'' or the sequence where Janet Leigh absconds with the money and makes her way down the highway to the point of expressing disdain for acting Bates Motel, and dialogue.especially the scenes where she is alone in her rooms, and silently debating on going through with her desperate plan or trying to go back and set right. This ends of course, drastically.
18th Mar '17 1:43:34 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AuthorAppeal: Most female main characters will be blondes, though this feature only comes in his 50s-60s films, where earlier actresses like Joan Fontaine, Teresa Wright, Ingrid Bergman, Sylvia Sidney tending to be BrainyBrunette. Hitchcock himself pointed out that his films were subversions and critique of the DumbBlonde stereotype popular in the 50s, actresses like Grace Kelly, Eva Marie Saint, Janet Leigh and Tippi Hedren had vastly more complex motivations and HiddenDepths than other films of that time.


Added DiffLines:

* BrieferThanTheyThink:[[invoked]] The "Hitchcock blonde" unleashes [[SmallReferencePools a perennial groan]] from many Hitchcock scholars for this reason. Hitchcock had a career from TheTwenties to TheSeventies. Before TheFifties, the only real major blonde actress is Anny Ondra in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'' made in 1929. In between, most of Hitchcock's leading ladies were black-haired or brunettes (Sylvia Sidney, Creator/JoanFontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Teresa Wright). It is only in TheFifties that you see prominently blonde actresses (Creator/GraceKelly, Kim Novak, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Vera Miles, Janet Leigh) and as Hitchcock explained this was [[EveryoneLovesBlondes because blondes were popular]] in TheFifties, and as [[FollowTheLeader a mainstream film-maker]], he more or less did reflect popular ongoing trends in his movies. Film scholars and at one point, Hitchcock himself, also pointed out all his blonde characters are subversions of the DumbBlonde stereotype, in that they were cool, sophisticated, elegant ''and'' smart.
4th Mar '17 12:55:26 PM Movienut376
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' (1960) – Janet Leigh tries to steal some money and winds up having a fatal encounter in a shower. Anthony Perkins steals the show as a troubled mama’s boy. Famous for having two very, VERY shocking plot twists that audiences did not see coming, but have today fallen to [[ItWasHisSled spoilers]]. Or at least one of them has. Nominated for Best Director.

to:

* ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' (1960) – Janet Leigh tries to steal some money and winds up having a fatal encounter in a shower. Anthony Perkins steals the show as a troubled mama’s boy. Famous for having two very, VERY shocking plot twists that audiences did not see coming, but have today fallen to [[ItWasHisSled spoilers]]. Or at least one of them has. Nominated for Best Director. Regarded by most as the first slasher film.
18th Jan '17 9:29:09 PM Pren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BigEater: He certainly was not "big boned." Creator/MelBrooks frequently relates a story about having dinner with him after a screening of Brooks's AffectionateParody film, ''Film/HighAnxiety'', where Hitch consumed a 2" steak, a baked potato, a plate of asparagus and two bowls of ice cream. ''Twice''

to:

* BigEater: He certainly was not "big boned." Creator/MelBrooks frequently relates a story about having dinner with him after a screening of Brooks's AffectionateParody film, ''Film/HighAnxiety'', where Hitch consumed a 2" steak, a baked potato, a plate of asparagus and two bowls of ice cream. ''Twice''''Twice''. He was actually turned down for military service in World War I due to his obesity.



* CreatorCameo: He appears in every film in a nonspeaking role. This habit became so famous that he confined his appearances to the first fifteen minutes of his films so that audiences would not be distracted watching for him among the extras. In ''Film/TheWrongMan'', he appears personally in silhouette and introduces the film, apparently because it was based on a true story. In ''Lifeboat'', since it's set entirely within the titular lifeboat, he appears in a weight-loss advert in a newspaper - he had recently lost a substantial amount of weight and was the model for both the before and after shots. In ''Family Plot'', his last film, he isn't (technically) on screen at all - only his silhouette appears, cast on frosted glass, in a fashion reminiscent of the opening of ''Presents''.

to:

* CreatorCameo: He appears in every film in a nonspeaking role. This habit became so famous that he confined his appearances to the first fifteen minutes of his films so that audiences would not be distracted watching for him among the extras. In ''Film/TheWrongMan'', he appears personally in silhouette and introduces the film, apparently because it was based on a true story. In ''Lifeboat'', since it's set entirely within the titular lifeboat, he appears in a weight-loss advert in a newspaper - he had recently lost a substantial amount of weight and was the model for both the before and after shots. In ''Family Plot'', his last film, he isn't (technically) on screen at all - only his silhouette appears, cast on frosted glass, in a fashion reminiscent of the opening of ''Presents''. This started with his second film as director, ''The Lodger'', in which he simply found himself short of extras one day so he and a few other crew members filled in. After seeing how popular spotting him became, he kept it up.
12th Jan '17 9:32:59 AM moloch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Juno and the Paycock'' (1929) – In Revolution-era Ireland, a family finds out that they will earn a huge inheritance and quickly forget their old values.

to:

* ''Juno and the Paycock'' (1929) – In Revolution-era Civil War-era Ireland, a family finds out that they will earn a huge inheritance and quickly forget their old values.
7th Jan '17 10:07:37 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Rebecca}}'' (1940) – His first American movie. Producer David O. Selznick (of ''Gone With The Wind'' fame) convinced Hitchcock to move to America because Hollywood offered more money and better production values. Based off the famous book of the same name. A naïve young woman (Joan Fontaine) marries a wealthy widower (LaurenceOlivier), but the legacy of his former wife, Rebecca, haunts everyone, including her. The only Hitchcock movie to win Best Picture at the Oscars. Best Director nomination.

to:

* ''Film/{{Rebecca}}'' (1940) – His first American movie. Producer David O. Selznick (of ''Gone With The Wind'' fame) convinced Hitchcock to move to America because Hollywood offered more money and better production values. Based off the famous book of the same name. A naïve young woman (Joan Fontaine) marries a wealthy widower (LaurenceOlivier), (Creator/LaurenceOlivier), but the legacy of his former wife, Rebecca, haunts everyone, including her. The only Hitchcock movie to win Best Picture at the Oscars. Best Director nomination.
11th Dec '16 8:36:57 PM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Appeared in the sixth episode of Season 4 of ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', portrayed by Lloyd Ahlquist, against Creator/StevenSpielberg and [[Creator/QuentinTarantino some]] [[Creator/StanleyKubrick other]] [[Creator/MichaelBay directors]].

to:

* Appeared Played by Lloyd Ahlquist in the sixth episode of Season 4 of ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', portrayed by Lloyd Ahlquist, against Creator/StevenSpielberg and [[Creator/QuentinTarantino some]] [[Creator/StanleyKubrick other]] [[Creator/MichaelBay directors]].
5th Nov '16 5:50:58 PM RushLimborg
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Appeared in the sixth episode of Season 4 of ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', portrayed by Lloyd Ahlquist, against Creator/StevenSpielberg and some other directors.

to:

* Appeared in the sixth episode of Season 4 of ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', portrayed by Lloyd Ahlquist, against Creator/StevenSpielberg and some other directors.[[Creator/QuentinTarantino some]] [[Creator/StanleyKubrick other]] [[Creator/MichaelBay directors]].



* DramaticIrony: He was the master of "suspense", this was his chief weapon in capturing and keeping the attention of the audience. Almost all of his films contain a situation where the viewer knows more than (some of) the characters, or can see something or someone coming that a character is unaware of. He also stated in interviews that he generally did not like "plot twists" (''Film/{{Psycho}} being one of the exceptions) and he regretted some of the gimmicks like the "lying flashback" in ''Stage Fright'' which he felt rested on fooling and deceiving the audience, and as such tended [[ItWasHisSled to get dated very fast]]

to:

* DramaticIrony: He was the master of "suspense", this was his chief weapon in capturing and keeping the attention of the audience. Almost all of his films contain a situation where the viewer knows more than (some of) the characters, or can see something or someone coming that a character is unaware of. He also stated in interviews that he generally did not like "plot twists" (''Film/{{Psycho}} (''Film/{{Psycho}}'' being one of the exceptions) and he regretted some of the gimmicks like the "lying flashback" in ''Stage Fright'' which he felt rested on fooling and deceiving the audience, and as such tended [[ItWasHisSled to get dated very fast]]
12th Oct '16 5:40:13 PM LongTallShorty64
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Suspicion}}'' (1941) – A woman (Joan Fontaine) suspects that her new husband is planning to murder her. The first of four Hitchcock films starring Creator/CaryGrant. Nominated for Best Picture, and Joan Fontaine won Best Actress.

to:

* ''Film/{{Suspicion}}'' (1941) – A woman (Joan Fontaine) (Creator/JoanFontaine) suspects that her new husband is planning to murder her. The first of four Hitchcock films starring Creator/CaryGrant. Nominated for Best Picture, and Joan Fontaine won Best Actress.
This list shows the last 10 events of 212. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AlfredHitchcock