History Creator / AlfredHitchcock

24th Nov '17 11:25:16 AM nombretomado
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Although "Hitch" is now considered one of the greatest directors of all time, for much of his life he was regarded as a [[UnderestimatingBadassery mere entertainer]] rather than a serious artist. The FrenchNewWave critics, especially Creator/FrancoisTruffaut, played a major role in correcting this by propounding the "auteur theory", which holds up the director (rather than the producer, screenwriter, actors, etc.) as the key artist on a film. Hitchcock was regarded as the major exemplar as this.

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Although "Hitch" is now considered one of the greatest directors of all time, for much of his life he was regarded as a [[UnderestimatingBadassery mere entertainer]] rather than a serious artist. The FrenchNewWave UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave critics, especially Creator/FrancoisTruffaut, played a major role in correcting this by propounding the "auteur theory", which holds up the director (rather than the producer, screenwriter, actors, etc.) as the key artist on a film. Hitchcock was regarded as the major exemplar as this.
24th Nov '17 9:48:22 AM nombretomado
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* ''Film/TornCurtain'' (1966) – Michael Armstrong (Creator/PaulNewman), an esteemed American rocket scientist, defects to EastGermany. Sarah Sherman (Creator/JulieAndrews), his assistant and fiancée, reluctantly follows him. Armstrong is actually a FakeDefector, but the Stasi is determined to keep him within the East German borders. Has a scene that realistically proves how difficult it actually is to murder someone.

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* ''Film/TornCurtain'' (1966) – Michael Armstrong (Creator/PaulNewman), an esteemed American rocket scientist, defects to EastGermany.UsefulNotes/EastGermany. Sarah Sherman (Creator/JulieAndrews), his assistant and fiancée, reluctantly follows him. Armstrong is actually a FakeDefector, but the Stasi is determined to keep him within the East German borders. Has a scene that realistically proves how difficult it actually is to murder someone.
8th Nov '17 12:35:12 PM Lawman592
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* ''The Paradine Case'' (1947) – An English barrister (Creator/GregoryPeck) falls in love with the defendant in a murder trial.

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* ''The Paradine Case'' (1947) – An English barrister (Creator/GregoryPeck) falls in love with the defendant in a murder trial. Considered one of Hitchcock's lesser films, it was the last movie he did [[ContractualObligationProject under his contract to Selznick.]]
27th Oct '17 9:31:08 AM DustSnitch
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** MonumentalBattle: The Albert Hall in ''Film/TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'', the UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.

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** MonumentalBattle: The Albert Hall in ''Film/TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'', the UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty Art/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.
26th Oct '17 4:40:19 AM jormis29
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* BrieferThanTheyThink: [[invoked]] The "Hitchcock blonde" unleashes [[SmallReferencePools a perennial groan]] from many Hitchcock scholars for this reason. Hitchcock had a career from TheTwenties to TheSeventies. Before TheFifties, the only real major blonde actress is Anny Ondra in ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'' made in 1929. In between, most of Hitchcock's leading ladies were black-haired or brunettes (Sylvia Sidney, Creator/JoanFontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Teresa Wright). It is only in TheFifties that you see prominently blonde actresses (Creator/GraceKelly, Kim Novak, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Vera Miles, Janet Leigh) and as Hitchcock explained this was [[EveryoneLovesBlondes because blondes were popular]] in TheFifties, and as [[FollowTheLeader a mainstream film-maker]], he more or less did reflect popular ongoing trends in his movies. Film scholars and at one point, Hitchcock himself, also pointed out all his blonde characters are subversions of the DumbBlonde stereotype, in that they were cool, sophisticated, elegant ''and'' smart.

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* BrieferThanTheyThink: [[invoked]] The "Hitchcock blonde" unleashes [[SmallReferencePools a perennial groan]] from many Hitchcock scholars for this reason. Hitchcock had a career from TheTwenties to TheSeventies. Before TheFifties, the only real major blonde actress is Anny Ondra in ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'' made in 1929. In between, most of Hitchcock's leading ladies were black-haired or brunettes (Sylvia Sidney, Creator/JoanFontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Teresa Wright). It is only in TheFifties that you see prominently blonde actresses (Creator/GraceKelly, Kim Novak, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Vera Miles, Creator/VeraMiles, Janet Leigh) and as Hitchcock explained this was [[EveryoneLovesBlondes because blondes were popular]] in TheFifties, and as [[FollowTheLeader a mainstream film-maker]], he more or less did reflect popular ongoing trends in his movies. Film scholars and at one point, Hitchcock himself, also pointed out all his blonde characters are subversions of the DumbBlonde stereotype, in that they were cool, sophisticated, elegant ''and'' smart.
2nd Oct '17 12:07:04 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

Important books on Hitchcock's life and working methods include: ''Hitchcock[=/=]Truffaut'', the founding work and still the definitive oral history; Bill Krohn's ''Hitchcock at Work'' (the best single volume text on how Hitchcock actually worked, based on extensive and thorough archival research); and Patrick [=McGilligan=]'s ''Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light'' is by general academic consensus, the best and most reliable biography on Hitchcock. Other important books on Hitchcock's films, life and production habits include Stephen Rebello's book on the Production of ''Psycho'', Dan Aulier's account of the Making of ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' and Tony Lee Moral's book on the Making of Marnie (revised edition, 2013).
16th Sep '17 6:32:25 AM Kitchen90
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The acknowledged master of cinematic [[DramaticIrony suspense]], Alfred Joseph Hitchcock (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) is one of the most famous directors of all time, if not ''the'' most famous. Most people have probably seen at least one of his films at some time or another.

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The acknowledged master of cinematic [[DramaticIrony suspense]], [[KnightFever Sir]] Alfred Joseph Hitchcock Hitchcock, KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) is one of the most famous directors of all time, if not ''the'' most famous. Most people have probably seen at least one of his films at some time or another.
8th Sep '17 5:59:48 AM JamesAustin
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-> ''“People believe that the cinema has to, by necessity, be horizontal in its form. That is, go to a great many places and locales. That is not so. It should be possible to make an interesting film in a closet with the door shut. The idea is to reveal human nature and behavior with your camera moves. This presupposes, of course, an interesting story and characters worth revealing.”''

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-> ''“People ''"People believe that the cinema has to, by necessity, be horizontal in its form. That is, go to a great many places and locales. That is not so. It should be possible to make an interesting film in a closet with the door shut. The idea is to reveal human nature and behavior with your camera moves. This presupposes, of course, an interesting story and characters worth revealing.”''
"''



* ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'' (1929) – The first sound feature ever made in the UK. In fact, it was already in production as a silent movie when [[ExecutiveMeddling the producers decided to make it a sound picture]]. So there are two versions available. A young woman kills an attempted rapist in self defense, and a petty thief discovers evidence that suggests it was murder. He tries to blackmail her, but unwittingly winds up implicating himself.

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* ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'' ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'' (1929) – The first sound feature ever made in the UK. In fact, it was already in production as a silent movie when [[ExecutiveMeddling the producers decided to make it a sound picture]]. So there are two versions available. A young woman kills an attempted rapist in self defense, and a petty thief discovers evidence that suggests it was murder. He tries to blackmail her, but unwittingly winds up implicating himself.



* BrieferThanTheyThink:[[invoked]] The "Hitchcock blonde" unleashes [[SmallReferencePools a perennial groan]] from many Hitchcock scholars for this reason. Hitchcock had a career from TheTwenties to TheSeventies. Before TheFifties, the only real major blonde actress is Anny Ondra in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'' made in 1929. In between, most of Hitchcock's leading ladies were black-haired or brunettes (Sylvia Sidney, Creator/JoanFontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Teresa Wright). It is only in TheFifties that you see prominently blonde actresses (Creator/GraceKelly, Kim Novak, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Vera Miles, Janet Leigh) and as Hitchcock explained this was [[EveryoneLovesBlondes because blondes were popular]] in TheFifties, and as [[FollowTheLeader a mainstream film-maker]], he more or less did reflect popular ongoing trends in his movies. Film scholars and at one point, Hitchcock himself, also pointed out all his blonde characters are subversions of the DumbBlonde stereotype, in that they were cool, sophisticated, elegant ''and'' smart.

to:

* BrieferThanTheyThink:[[invoked]] BrieferThanTheyThink: [[invoked]] The "Hitchcock blonde" unleashes [[SmallReferencePools a perennial groan]] from many Hitchcock scholars for this reason. Hitchcock had a career from TheTwenties to TheSeventies. Before TheFifties, the only real major blonde actress is Anny Ondra in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'' ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'' made in 1929. In between, most of Hitchcock's leading ladies were black-haired or brunettes (Sylvia Sidney, Creator/JoanFontaine, Creator/IngridBergman, Teresa Wright). It is only in TheFifties that you see prominently blonde actresses (Creator/GraceKelly, Kim Novak, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Vera Miles, Janet Leigh) and as Hitchcock explained this was [[EveryoneLovesBlondes because blondes were popular]] in TheFifties, and as [[FollowTheLeader a mainstream film-maker]], he more or less did reflect popular ongoing trends in his movies. Film scholars and at one point, Hitchcock himself, also pointed out all his blonde characters are subversions of the DumbBlonde stereotype, in that they were cool, sophisticated, elegant ''and'' smart.



** MonumentalBattle: The Albert Hall in ''Film/TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'', the UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.

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** MonumentalBattle: The Albert Hall in ''Film/TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'', the UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'', ''Film/{{Blackmail|1929}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.
28th Aug '17 11:20:21 PM Kalmbach
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** MonumentalBattle: The UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.

to:

** MonumentalBattle: The Albert Hall in ''Film/TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'', the UsefulNotes/StatueOfLiberty in ''Film/{{Saboteur}}'', the British Museum in ''Film/{{Blackmail}}'', and Mount Rushmore in ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''.



* SilenceIsGolden: Even movies Hitchcock directed after the silent era occasionally manage to create drama without dialogue. Long stretches of ''Vertigo'' and ''Psycho'' involve observing characters go about their work and behaviour, such as when Scottie is tailing Madeline in the early part of ''Vertigo'' or the sequence where Janet Leigh absconds with the money and makes her way down the highway to the Bates Motel, and especially the scenes where she is alone in her rooms, and silently debating on going through with her desperate plan or trying to go back and set right. This ends of course, drastically.

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* SilenceIsGolden: Even movies Hitchcock directed after the silent era occasionally manage to create drama without dialogue. The concert scene in both versions of ''The Man Who Knew Too Much'' is without dialog, and the remade version is even longer than the original, with only music, up until the heroine screams. Long stretches of ''Vertigo'' and ''Psycho'' involve observing characters go about their work and behaviour, such as when Scottie is tailing Madeline in the early part of ''Vertigo'' or the sequence where Janet Leigh absconds with the money and makes her way down the highway to the Bates Motel, and especially the scenes where she is alone in her rooms, and silently debating on going through with her desperate plan or trying to go back and set right. This ends of course, drastically.
21st Aug '17 9:26:00 AM Morgenthaler
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* Played by Toby Jones in ''Film/TheGirl'', about Hitchcock's relationship with Tippi Hedren.

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* Played by Toby Jones in ''Film/TheGirl'', about Hitchcock's relationship with Tippi Hedren. Led to accusations of doing a HistoricalVillainUpgrade of Hitchcock.
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