History CowboyBebopAtHisComputer / Other

6th Nov '17 1:52:18 AM Ezclee4050
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** The common perception outside Australia is that UsefulNotes/AustralianRulesFootball is a form of rugby. Actually, rugby wasn't formally introduced to Australia until several years after Aussie rules was invented.[[note]]The main inventor of Aussie rules, Tom Wills, was very familiar with rugby, having attended Rugby School in England. But in codifying Aussie rules, he deliberately tried to make the game different from rugby[[/note]]. Since Aussie rules and rugby have a strong FandomRivalry in Australia, this mistake can be a BerserkButton for some people.

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** The common perception outside Australia is that UsefulNotes/AustralianRulesFootball is a form of rugby. Actually, rugby wasn't formally introduced to Australia until several years after Aussie rules was invented.[[note]]The main inventor of Aussie rules, Tom Wills, was very familiar with rugby, having attended Rugby School in England. But in codifying Aussie rules, he deliberately tried to make the game different from rugby[[/note]]. rugby[[/note]] Since Aussie rules and rugby have a strong FandomRivalry in Australia, this mistake can be a BerserkButton for some people.
6th Nov '17 1:50:04 AM Ezclee4050
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Added DiffLines:

** The common perception outside Australia is that UsefulNotes/AustralianRulesFootball is a form of rugby. Actually, rugby wasn't formally introduced to Australia until several years after Aussie rules was invented.[[note]]The main inventor of Aussie rules, Tom Wills, was very familiar with rugby, having attended Rugby School in England. But in codifying Aussie rules, he deliberately tried to make the game different from rugby[[/note]]. Since Aussie rules and rugby have a strong FandomRivalry in Australia, this mistake can be a BerserkButton for some people.
3rd Nov '17 10:43:41 PM DudeBob
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* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. As a matter of fact, the Nazis mentioned the KKK, unfavorably, in their anti-American propaganda. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever. They were also the co-sponsors of the infamous 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a liberal counter-protestor by a white supremacist.
** On top of that, the Baptist church, who had supported the KKK in the past, is now promoting the idea of "liberating" Christians from the "secular" government, donating to conservative politicians who vow to ban LGBT rights and abortion in the name of "Religious Freedom." This technically violates Separation of Church and State, which the Baptist church once claimed to uphold, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and that's all this editor is going to say on the matter]].

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* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. As a matter of fact, the Nazis mentioned the KKK, unfavorably, in their anti-American propaganda. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever. They were also the co-sponsors of the infamous 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a liberal counter-protestor by a white supremacist.\n** On top of that, the Baptist church, who had supported the KKK in the past, is now promoting the idea of "liberating" Christians from the "secular" government, donating to conservative politicians who vow to ban LGBT rights and abortion in the name of "Religious Freedom." This technically violates Separation of Church and State, which the Baptist church once claimed to uphold, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and that's all this editor is going to say on the matter]].
1st Oct '17 9:05:19 AM nombretomado
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* When German radio channel WDR 2 reported on the ''Bielefeld Conspiracy'' they claimed Usenet was the predecessor to the Internet, apparently confusing it with the Arpanet. Usenet is actually a term for newsgroups, which, like e-mail, continue to be used ''over'' the Internet. The report also failed to point out that the ''Bielefeld Conspiracy'' parodied ConspiracyTheories (they called it a satire but did not elaborate), fueling the misconception that the denial of the existence of Bielefeld, rather than the city itself, was the conspiracy.

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* When German radio channel WDR 2 reported on the ''Bielefeld Conspiracy'' they claimed Usenet was the predecessor to the Internet, apparently confusing it with the Arpanet. Usenet is actually a term for newsgroups, which, like e-mail, continue to be used ''over'' the Internet. The report also failed to point out that the ''Bielefeld Conspiracy'' parodied ConspiracyTheories UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories (they called it a satire but did not elaborate), fueling the misconception that the denial of the existence of Bielefeld, rather than the city itself, was the conspiracy.
27th Sep '17 5:49:33 AM BrendanRizzo
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* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever. They were also the co-sponsors of the infamous 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a liberal counter-protestor by a white supremacist.

to:

* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. As a matter of fact, the Nazis mentioned the KKK, unfavorably, in their anti-American propaganda. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever. They were also the co-sponsors of the infamous 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a liberal counter-protestor by a white supremacist.
26th Sep '17 9:54:29 AM ooh
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* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever.

to:

* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever. They were also the co-sponsors of the infamous 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a liberal counter-protestor by a white supremacist.
24th Sep '17 12:00:15 PM nombretomado
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* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever.

to:

* Since the 1920s - in other words, for as long as fascism has existed - otherwise intelligent commentators (including early on, and most famously, no less a personage than Ho Chi Minh) have referred to [[TheKlan the Ku Klux Klan]] as a [[GodwinsLaw fascist]] organization. Their reasoning is that, like the Nazis [[note]] who, of course, did not yet exist in the 1920s, but nationalism and racism had already been conflated in the public mind [[/note]], the Klan are nationalistic and racist. Not only was fascism originally ''not'' racist (BenitoMussolini (UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini started the movement in the early '20s and didn't adopt racism until the late 1930s), but the fascist ideal is grounded in the totalitarian state, which members of the KKK have never supported. Indeed, they formed as an ''anti-government'' terrorist group opposing Reconstruction (nearly half a century before the word ''fascism'' was even coined, no less), and often operated out of Baptist churches, who were at the time conspicuously non-hierarchical and strongly in favor of the separation of church and state, both of which are completely anathema to fascism. [[AndThatsTerrible This is not to say that the Klan were good people]], but that to call them fascists is unfair: one can be nationalistic and (to some degree, at least) racist and still believe in democratic values. But commentators have seen [[StrangeBedfellows Klansmen alongside neo-Nazis at "white-power" rallies]] and assumed the two groups were basically interchangeable. That's not to say, however, that the organization is supportive of the Democratic Party either; they endorsed UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump, a hardcore conservative Republican, as President in 2016, and nationalism, ultra-patriotism, and anti-government rhetoric have since become commonplace in the Republican Party now more than ever.
23rd Sep '17 4:24:15 PM DarcyFoster
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''Sky Sports Football[[note]]soccer to the Americans readings[[/note]] Yearbook'' has a quote on the back saying that it "stands for authority and integrity". So why their "Cups and Ups and Downs Diary" in the 2014/15 edition stated that Germany beat the Netherlands (instead of Argentina - the team that knocked the Netherlands out of the World Cup) in the 2014 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup FIFA World Cup final]] is anybody's guess.
21st Sep '17 12:20:11 PM Twentington
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** [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale Confusing units]], up to mistaking ''light-years'' for kilometers and this without including to bother to check if a "billion" is it's short-scale (10[[superscript:9]]) or long-scale (10[[superscript:12]]).

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** [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale Confusing units]], up to mistaking ''light-years'' for kilometers and this without including to bother to check if a "billion" is it's short-scale (10[[superscript:9]]) or long-scale (10[[superscript:12]]).
8th Sep '17 12:27:38 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** The sport is often referred to as "ultimate fighting" based on the popularity of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. This is perhaps due to a misunderstanding of the name's connotations, assuming that the UFC is the championship of "ultimate fighting" rather than the ultimate championship of fighting. Mixed martial artists are also sometimes called "ultimate fighters" for similar reasons, even if they don't fight in the UFC. Zuffa, promoters of the UFC, even puts on a reality show called ''Series/TheUltimateFighter''. Overall, Zuffa probably doesn't want to discourage their brand name being so strongly associated with the sport.

to:

** The sport is often referred to as "ultimate fighting" based on the popularity of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. This is perhaps due to a misunderstanding of the name's connotations, assuming that the UFC is the championship of "ultimate fighting" rather than the ultimate championship of fighting. Mixed martial artists are also sometimes called "ultimate fighters" for similar reasons, even if they don't fight in the UFC. Zuffa, promoters of the UFC, The UFC even puts on a reality show called ''Series/TheUltimateFighter''. Overall, Zuffa the UFC probably doesn't want to discourage their brand name being so strongly associated with the sport.



** It's also commonly referred to as "cage fighting" to associate it with dogfighting, implying that the athletes are locked inside the arena and cannot escape from the fight. Of course, this is not true, and many MMA promotions actually take place in modified boxing rings. Some promotions embrace the word, such as World Extreme Cagefighting, to make themselves sound more badass.

to:

** It's also commonly referred to as "cage fighting" to associate it with dogfighting, implying that the athletes are locked inside the arena and cannot escape from the fight. Of course, this is not true, and many MMA promotions actually take place in modified boxing rings. Some promotions embrace have embraced the word, such as World Extreme Cagefighting, to make themselves sound more badass.



** Most of these, at least, seem to be going away, at least in the US media. With the saturation of UFC on Fox and its affiliates, Bellator on Spike, and the World Series of Fighting on NBC, most mainstream news and sports outlets have started using the sports proper terms and concentrate on the actual upcoming matches and human interest stories involved, instead of stories focusing on the spectacle of "cage fighting." These will still pop up overseas in countries where MMA is just starting to catch on, usually from lazy journalists (often traditional boxing fans) who generally don't even bother doing any research whatsoever, other than skimming the most negative things they can find. This was especially prevalent in the last few years in Australia as the UFC exploded in popularity.
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