History CoolGuns / MachineGuns

27th May '17 3:23:53 AM TheWildWestPyro
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->The American designed Lewis automatic rifle was used by the British Empire during World War 1 and beyond. With a distinctive top-mounted, 47 round drum-pan magazine, it was capable of accurately firing 550 rounds per minute for up to 800m.

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->The ->''The American designed Lewis automatic rifle was used by the British Empire during World War 1 and beyond. With a distinctive top-mounted, 47 round drum-pan magazine, it was capable of accurately firing 550 rounds per minute for up to 800m.''
26th May '17 11:30:25 PM Kadorhal
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Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only seven seconds at longest thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather than distinct individual shots,[[note]]The [=MG42's=] rate of fire, averaging 1,200 rounds per minute but sometimes reaching 1,500 depending on the weight of the individual weapon's bolt, is too high for the human ear to discern the individual shots.[[/note]] leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying, and the fantastic suppressive fire it created . The [=MG42=] was the basis of some of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=],[[note]]Four variants of the [=MG1=] were built from the ground up, with changes to the original design including recalibrated sights for the different round, a chrome-lined barrel, and modifications to the bolt depending on the exact model; the [=MG2=] was made simply by taking wartime [=MG42=]s and rechambering them to 7.62mm NATO.[[/note]] and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but these wouldn't even cycle after the first shot because [[WhatAnIdiot the designers failed to account for the difference in size]] between .30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) and 7.92x57mm Mauser. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.

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Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only seven seconds at longest thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather than distinct individual shots,[[note]]The [=MG42's=] rate of fire, averaging 1,200 rounds per minute but sometimes reaching 1,500 depending on the weight of the individual weapon's bolt, is too high for the human ear to discern the individual shots.[[/note]] leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying, and the fantastic suppressive fire it created . created. The [=MG42=] was the basis of some of Germany's later 7.62x51mm NATO machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=],[[note]]Four variants of the [=MG1=] were built from the ground up, with changes to the original design including recalibrated sights for the different round, a chrome-lined barrel, and modifications to the bolt depending on the exact model; the [=MG2=] was made simply by taking wartime [=MG42=]s and rechambering them to 7.62mm NATO.[[/note]] and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but these wouldn't even cycle after the first shot because [[WhatAnIdiot the designers failed to account for the difference in size]] between .30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) and 7.92x57mm Mauser. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.



* The [=MG3=] shows up as an unlockable weapon in the ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany'' games.

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** ''United Offensive'' also features its predecessor, the [=MG34=], as the Germans' portable mounted machine gun (opposing the American M1919 and Soviet [=DP28=]); it also shows up in regular mounted but not portable form for a mission or two set before the [=MG42=]'s adoption.
* The [=MG3=] shows up as an unlockable weapon in the ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany'' games.games, used by the Medic.



* The CETME Ameli, a Spanish clone downsized for 5.56mm rounds and a distinctive carry handle, shows up as just the "Ameli" in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' and ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyAdvancedWarfare''.
* ''VideoGame/DayOfInfamy'' features this gun along with the MG 34 for the Wehrmacht Machinegunner and Support classes respectively. The MG 42 loaded from 250-round belts while the MG 34 uses a 50 round drum.

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* The CETME Ameli, a Spanish clone downsized for 5.56mm rounds and given a distinctive carry handle, shows up as just the "Ameli" in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' and ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyAdvancedWarfare''.
* ''VideoGame/DayOfInfamy'' features this gun along with the MG 34 for the Wehrmacht Machinegunner and Support classes respectively. The MG 42 loaded loads from 250-round belts and can only be aimed while deployed, while the MG 34 uses a 50 round drum.drum and can be aimed properly from the shoulder; the 34 also gets select-fire capabilities that the 42 lacks, owing to its double-crescent trigger in reality (essentially two finger grooves carved into one trigger, pulling on the top half for semi-auto and the bottom half for full-auto).



* ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder''[='=]s prologue chapter and its prequel DLC ''[[VideoGame/WolfensteinTheOldBlood The Old Blood]]'' feature the "[=MG46=]", which is basically a minigun made from four [=MG42=] barrels.

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* ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder''[='=]s prologue chapter and its prequel DLC ''[[VideoGame/WolfensteinTheOldBlood The Old Blood]]'' feature the "[=MG46=]", which is basically a minigun made from four an [=MG42=] made into a [[GatlingGood minigun]] by slapping on another three barrels.



* Appears in ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 1'' and ''2''; it's rather infamous, particularly in use with hackers, due to its low recoil, hundred-round belt, and having the easiest sight to use among its class. ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' lets you use it in the 1980's missions, where, due to just reusing the ''[=MW2=]'' model, it has an anachronistic Picatinny rail above the feed tray.

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* Appears in ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 1'' and ''2''; it's rather infamous, particularly in use with hackers, due to its low recoil, hundred-round belt, and having the easiest sight to use among its class. [[note]]Also, in ''[[VideoGameRemake Modern Warfare Remastered]]'', its reloading animation has been modified to match how the weapon reloads in reality - replace the belt, ''then'' pull back the bolt.[[/note]] ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' lets you use it in the 1980's missions, where, due to just reusing the ''[=MW2=]'' model, it has an anachronistic Picatinny rail above the feed tray.



* Shows up in ''VideoGame/GhostRecon Future Soldier'' as a Bodark weapon for some reason.

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* Shows up in ''VideoGame/GhostRecon Future Soldier'' as a Bodark weapon for some reason. It's the Mk.5 variant, but it loads from the original drum magazines and can be fitted with the fixed stock of the Mk.2.



* The Mk.5 variant appears in ''VideoGame/Battlefield4'' as the first LMG unlocked for the Support class in multiplayer mode. Notably, it is incorrectly depicted being able to chamber a round, rather than it's proper open bolt mechanism.

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* The Mk.5 variant appears in ''VideoGame/Battlefield4'' as the first LMG unlocked for the Support class in multiplayer mode. Notably, it is incorrectly depicted being able to keep a round in the chamber a round, when reloaded, rather than it's its proper open bolt mechanism.



* The Vickers is used by british vehicles in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.
* In ''VideoGame/DayOfInfamy'', the Vickers Mk VI machine gun is available in a rare infantry-carried variant with deployable bipod for the Commonwealth faction.

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* The Vickers is used by british on British vehicles in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.
* In ''VideoGame/DayOfInfamy'', a modified version of the Vickers Mk VI machine gun is available in a rare infantry-carried variant with deployable bipod from the Mk VII for the Commonwealth faction.faction's Machine Gunner class; like the American M1919 and German [=MG42=], it can be fired without being deployed, but you can't use the sights to do so (especially so given the carry handle is in the way of the sights, which the character pushes out of the way in the deploying animation).
26th May '17 1:03:36 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder''[='=]s prologue chapter and its prequel DLC ''[[VideoGame/WolfensteinTheOldBlood The Old Blood]]'' feature the "[=MG46=]", which is basically a minigun made from four [=MG42=] barrels.
17th May '17 4:47:25 AM TheWildWestPyro
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A collaborative effort between legendary Soviet gun designers Vasily Degtyaryov (who designed the [=PTRD=] anti-tank rifle and DP-28 machine gun) and Gegorgi Shpagin (designer of the [=PPSh=]-41), the ''Degtyaryova-Shpagina Krupnokaliberny'' is the Soviet equivalent to the M2 Browning, firing a 12.7x108mm round that has a slightly larger case than the American .50 BMG. Introduced in 1938, the [=DShK=] was the heavy machine gun used by the Soviets in nearly identical roles to the M2 during World War II and onwards, such as an anti-aircraft weapon for tanks and trucks. It was also used in an iconic two-wheeled trolley equipped with a metal shield for heavy infantry support. In the 1970’s, it was largely replaced with the NSV and then later the Kord [=HMG=]s. However, like many Soviet-era Russian weapons it was imported by a number of client states and produced under license, still seeing use in many of them. It has also been popular with insurgent forces, such as the Viet Cong and Provisional IRA. Russian troops nicknamed it "Dushka" (“Sweetie” or “Dearest”) due to the similarity in pronunciation.

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A collaborative effort between legendary Soviet gun designers Vasily Degtyaryov (who designed the [=PTRD=] anti-tank rifle and DP-28 machine gun) and Gegorgi Shpagin (designer of the [=PPSh=]-41), the ''Degtyaryova-Shpagina Krupnokaliberny'' is the Soviet equivalent to the M2 Browning, firing a 12.7x108mm round that has a slightly larger case than the American .50 BMG. Introduced in 1938, the [=DShK=] was the heavy machine gun used by the Soviets in nearly identical roles to the M2 during World War II and onwards, such as an anti-aircraft weapon for tanks and trucks. It was also used in an iconic two-wheeled trolley equipped with a metal shield for heavy infantry support. support, such as the one pictured above. In the 1970’s, 1970s, it was largely replaced with the NSV and then later the Kord [=HMG=]s. [=HMG=]s, both also chambered in 12.7mm. However, like many Soviet-era Russian weapons weapons, it was imported by a number of client states states, such as China, Iraq and Poland, and produced under license, still seeing use in many of them. It has also been popular with insurgent forces, such as the Viet Cong and Provisional IRA. Russian troops nicknamed it "Dushka" (“Sweetie” or “Dearest”) due to the similarity in pronunciation.
17th May '17 4:45:25 AM TheWildWestPyro
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[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/unknown_634.jpeg]]

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14th May '17 7:46:35 PM TheWildWestPyro
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The standard light machine gun of the British Empire and Commonwealth nations in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and remained in limited use all the way into the early 1990s and was kept in reserve until 2006, considered one of the finest and reliable light machine guns ever made. Easily recognized by its distinctive top-mounted removable box magazine, the Bren was adapted from the Czechoslovak ZB vz. 26, with its caliber changed to the standard .303 British round. The name "Bren" is a contraction of "Brno" (where the Czechoslovak original was developed) and "Enfield" (where the British version was adapted). While it was still magazine-fed instead of belt-fed, it used larger 30-round magazines and the top-mounted magazines were much quicker to change, especially when firing prone. An interesting note, however, is that most soldiers considered the Bren to be ''too good'' for the role it was meant for - in particular, it was too accurate for effective suppressive fire (which isn't ''meant'' to hit anything); there are stories of some Bren guns used up to the Persian Gulf War that had their barrels deliberately damaged to reduce the accuracy so they could properly suppress enemies. After WWII, the Bren was redesigned into the L4 which used the 7.62 NATO round, and this version could use the same magazines as the [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FN FAL]], seeing service in the Falklands war alongside all other Commonwealth conflicts of the postwar era.

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The standard light machine gun of the British Empire and Commonwealth nations in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and remained in limited use all the way into the early 1990s and was kept in reserve until 2006, considered one of the finest and reliable light machine guns ever made. Easily recognized by its distinctive top-mounted removable box magazine, the Bren was adapted from the Czechoslovak ZB vz. 26, with its caliber changed to the standard .303 British round. The name "Bren" is a contraction of "Brno" (where the Czechoslovak original was developed) and "Enfield" (where the British version was adapted). While it was still magazine-fed instead of belt-fed, it used larger 30-round magazines and the top-mounted magazines were much quicker to change, especially when firing prone. An interesting note, however, is that most soldiers considered the Bren to be ''too good'' for the role it was meant for - in particular, it was too accurate for effective suppressive fire (which isn't ''meant'' to hit anything); there are stories of some Bren guns used up to the Persian Gulf War that had their barrels deliberately damaged to reduce the accuracy so they could properly suppress enemies. After WWII, the Bren was redesigned into the L4 which used the 7.62 62x51mm NATO round, and this version could use the same magazines as the [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FN FAL]], seeing service in the Falklands war alongside all other Commonwealth conflicts of the postwar era.



Proof that even John Moses Browning's failures could still be incredibly successful, the M1918 BAR was originally designed as a "walking fire" gun, a WW1 concept for an automatic weapon that could be fired from the hip by a soldier crossing no man's land to support his comrades. However, the BAR ended up a bit ahead of its time. Chambered for the same .30-06 ammunition as standard-issue rifles, the weapon was too cumbersome and unwieldy for its intended application (it would only be with the introduction of CoolGuns/{{assault rifles}} firing "intermediate" cartridges that the idea behind the BAR would become feasible). Being twice the weight of an M1 Garand and in post-1918 models almost ''thrice'' the weight of usual bolt-action rifles in .30-06; it was instead employed initially as a light machine gun, used to give the infantry squad additional firepower and range.

Despite being widely adopted and copied by countries such as Belgium, Poland and Taiwan, it had a number of flaws as a support weapon; in particular, it lacked any facility for changing barrels quickly[[note]]aside from some of the later European versions that did have quick-change barrels, as well as pistol-grip stocks[[/note]] or accepting a belt feed, instead only able to use 20-round box magazines. On top of that it was too ''light'' a weapon to use in this role - controlling it while firing fully automatic was pretty difficult. This effectively made it a very heavy battle rifle rather than a true light machine gun, and as such, was essentially the pioneer of the Squad Automatic Weapon concept. It was in this role that the BAR truly shined, with the platoon-level LMG duties being given to another Browning design, the M1919 light machine gun, while the BAR was issued at the squad-level by the Army and the fire team-level by the Marines. It continued in service with the US military right into the Vietnam War, eventually being replaced by the M60; the US National Guard continued to use it into the 70s, and some countries continued to use the BAR all the way into the 1990s. The modern FN MAG/M240 is also based in part on the BAR's action, except flipped upside down and adapted to belt-feed using an [=MG42=]-derived top plate.

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Proof that even John Moses Browning's failures could still be incredibly successful, the M1918 BAR was originally designed as a "walking fire" gun, a WW1 concept for an automatic weapon that could be fired from the hip by a soldier crossing no man's land to support his comrades. However, the BAR ended up a bit ahead of its time. Chambered for the same .30-06 Springfield ammunition as standard-issue rifles, the weapon was too cumbersome and unwieldy for its intended application (it would only be with the introduction of CoolGuns/{{assault rifles}} firing "intermediate" cartridges that the idea behind the BAR would become feasible). Being twice the weight of an M1 Garand and in post-1918 models almost ''thrice'' the weight of usual bolt-action rifles in .30-06; it was instead employed initially as a light machine gun, used to give the infantry squad additional firepower and range.

Despite being widely adopted and copied by countries such as Belgium, Poland and Taiwan, Nationalist China, who produced it in 7.92x57mm Mauser, it had a number of flaws as a support weapon; in particular, it lacked any facility for changing barrels quickly[[note]]aside from some of the later European versions that did have quick-change barrels, as well as pistol-grip stocks[[/note]] or accepting a belt feed, instead only able to use 20-round box magazines. On top of that it was too ''light'' a weapon to use in this role - controlling it while firing fully automatic was pretty difficult. This effectively made it a very heavy battle rifle rather than a true light machine gun, and as such, was essentially the pioneer of the Squad Automatic Weapon concept. It was in this role that the BAR truly shined, with the platoon-level LMG duties being given to another Browning design, the M1919 light machine gun, while the BAR was issued at the squad-level by the Army and the fire team-level by the Marines. It continued in service with the US military right into the Vietnam War, eventually being replaced by the M60; the US National Guard continued to use it into the 70s, and some countries continued to use the BAR all the way into the 1990s. The modern FN MAG/M240 is also based in part on the BAR's action, except flipped upside down and adapted to belt-feed using an [=MG42=]-derived top plate.



A water-cooled machine gun designed by John Moses Browning. Chambered in .30-06, the Browning M1917 can be said to be the American counterpart to the British Vickers gun and Maxim guns, sharing their intended roles and traits. Browning patented the weapon in 1900, creating a working prototype a decade later in 1910. The US military, however, showed little interest until they decided to enter UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in 1917. By that point, however, there weren't enough of the guns to go around, forcing the US military to rely on older or foreign-designed machine guns until later in the war.

The weapon was updated, and continued to see service after the First World War, but gradually fell out of frontline use as it was replaced by the simpler and lighter air-cooled Browning M1919. When UsefulNotes/WorldWarII started, the M1917 saw further use, particularly in the Pacific Theater (where its water-cooled mechanism proved ideally suitable for the humid temperatures of the Pacific), before gradually being phased out, although it did see limited service in UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar and the early stages of UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar by South Vietnamese forces. The Browning [=M1917=] was also imported in large numbers to China for the numerous warlord armies during the 1920s. Naturally, many were quickly reverse-engineered and a local copy, the Type 30, chambered in 7.92mm Mauser, was used by the Nationalist army as their main medium machine gun throughout the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the Chinese Civil War. The [=M1917=]'s tripod also proved ''very'' useful for mounting the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M18_recoilless_rifle [=M18=]]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M20_recoilless_rifle [=M20=]]] recoilless rifles, making them stable enough for accurate fire.

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A water-cooled machine gun designed by John Moses Browning. Chambered in .30-06, 30-06 Springfield, the Browning M1917 can be said to be the American counterpart to the British Vickers gun and Maxim guns, sharing their intended roles and traits. Browning patented the weapon in 1900, creating a working prototype a decade later in 1910. The US military, however, showed little interest until they decided to enter UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in 1917. By that point, however, there weren't enough of the guns to go around, forcing the US military to rely on older or foreign-designed machine guns until later in the war.

The weapon was updated, and continued to see service after the First World War, but gradually fell out of frontline use as it was replaced by the simpler and lighter air-cooled Browning M1919. When UsefulNotes/WorldWarII started, the M1917 saw further use, particularly in the Pacific Theater (where its water-cooled mechanism proved ideally suitable for the humid temperatures of the Pacific), before gradually being phased out, although it did see limited service in UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar and the early stages of UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar by South Vietnamese forces. The Browning [=M1917=] was also imported in large numbers to China for the numerous warlord armies during the 1920s. Naturally, many were quickly reverse-engineered and a local copy, the Type 30, chambered in 7.92mm 92x57mm Mauser, was used by the Nationalist army as their main medium machine gun throughout the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the Chinese Civil War. The [=M1917=]'s tripod also proved ''very'' useful for mounting the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M18_recoilless_rifle [=M18=]]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M20_recoilless_rifle [=M20=]]] recoilless rifles, making them stable enough for accurate fire.



The light machine gun of choice for the Red Army in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Just like the BAR above, it more or less is a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot machine-rifle]]. It has a distinct round horizontal-mounted pan (ie flat drum) magazine owing to the need to reliably fire the standard Russian 7.62x54R cartridge, giving it a very distinct look (and a significantly higher magazine capacity than box-fed machine guns, at 47 rounds). It also has exceptional reliability and a high tolerance for dirt, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in tests it fired over 500 rounds even after being buried in sand and mud]]. That said, there were still some issues with the weapon - in particular the bipod was flimsy enough that it would often break when fired. Its recoil spring was also wrapped around the gas piston directly under the barrel, which could cause it to lose temper and cause feed issues with the weapon when overheated; this was partially acknowledged with a rate of fire of 550 rounds per minute, [[BoringButPractical which also eliminated the need for a changeable barrel]]. In addition, the pan magazines, which were the only type found to reliably feed the 7.62x54mmR cartridge, were rather heavy and prone to being damaged, but at the same time weren't all that effective for sustained fire like contemporary belt-fed weapons the opposing German or allied American armies used.

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The light machine gun of choice for the Red Army in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Just like the BAR above, it more or less is a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot machine-rifle]]. It has a distinct round horizontal-mounted pan (ie flat drum) magazine owing to the need to reliably fire the standard Russian 7.62x54R 62x54mmR cartridge, giving it a very distinct look (and a significantly higher magazine capacity than box-fed machine guns, at 47 rounds). It also has exceptional reliability and a high tolerance for dirt, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in tests it fired over 500 rounds even after being buried in sand and mud]]. That said, there were still some issues with the weapon - in particular the bipod was flimsy enough that it would often break when fired. Its recoil spring was also wrapped around the gas piston directly under the barrel, which could cause it to lose temper and cause feed issues with the weapon when overheated; this was partially acknowledged with a rate of fire of 550 rounds per minute, [[BoringButPractical which also eliminated the need for a changeable barrel]]. In addition, the pan magazines, which were the only type found to reliably feed the 7.62x54mmR cartridge, were rather heavy and prone to being damaged, but at the same time weren't all that effective for sustained fire like contemporary belt-fed weapons the opposing German or allied American armies used.



The MAG (Mitrailleuse d'Appui Général; French for [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin General-Purpose Machine Gun]]) general purpose machine gun has seen usage in too many countries to list here. Generally regarded as ''the'' general purpose machine gun, it can be used for infantry support (though it's very heavy for this role, being 3 pounds heavier than the already hefty M60) or mounted on tanks, [=APCs=] and ships. One unusual aspect of its design is that the safety can only be engaged when the weapon is cocked. Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning. Despite its incredibly widespread use, in fiction you'll usually only see it on top of a tank. While its smaller cousin the [=M249=] is known to be a somewhat temperamental weapon, the [=M240=] ''always'' works.

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The 7.62x51mm MAG (Mitrailleuse d'Appui Général; French for [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin General-Purpose Machine Gun]]) general purpose machine gun has seen usage in too many countries to list here. Generally regarded as ''the'' general purpose machine gun, it can be used for infantry support (though it's very heavy for this role, being 3 pounds heavier than the already hefty M60) or mounted on tanks, [=APCs=] and ships. One unusual aspect of its design is that the safety can only be engaged when the weapon is cocked. Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning. Despite its incredibly widespread use, in fiction you'll usually only see it on top of a tank. While its smaller cousin the [=M249=] is known to be a somewhat temperamental weapon, the [=M240=] ''always'' works.



A light machine gun that was developed for the U.S. Army as a Squad Assault Weapon to replace the M60. The M249 was developed from the FN Herstal Minimi (short for Mini Mitrailleuse; or [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Mini Machine Gun]]) light machine gun and fires the 5.56mm NATO round whose lighter weight allowed gunners to carry more ammo. [[MoreDakka A lot more ammo.]] The standard feed mechanism is a 200-round belt, with a plastic container for the belt clipped to the bottom of the gun (thus allowing the gunner to operate independently of a loader), and in a pinch it can also use standard NATO 30-round assault rifle magazines.[[note]]Only variants older than the SPW have the STANAG magazine well; that type of magazine's springs cannot adequately account for the Minimi's higher rate of fire, causing jams when not fired in very short bursts. The magwell was eventually deleted to save some weight.[[/note]]

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A light machine gun that was developed for the U.S. Army as a Squad Assault Weapon to replace the M60. The M249 was developed from the FN Herstal Minimi (short for Mini Mitrailleuse; or [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Mini Machine Gun]]) light machine gun and fires the 5.56mm 56x45mm NATO round whose lighter weight allowed gunners to carry more ammo. [[MoreDakka A lot more ammo.]] The standard feed mechanism is a 200-round belt, with a plastic container for the belt clipped to the bottom of the gun (thus allowing the gunner to operate independently of a loader), and in a pinch it can also use standard NATO 30-round assault rifle magazines.[[note]]Only variants older than the SPW have the STANAG magazine well; that type of magazine's springs cannot adequately account for the Minimi's higher rate of fire, causing jams when not fired in very short bursts. The magwell was eventually deleted to save some weight.[[/note]]



* Appears in the climax of ''Film/TheMagnificentSeven2016'' and used by the villain's mercenaries. Nicknamed the "Devil's Breath" by Goodnight, it's depicted as a terrifying wonder weapon that practically shreds the town and is near-impossible



The basic [=HK21=] is chambered in 7.62x51mm NATO, though swapping out the barrel, bolt, and ammo feed allows it to be chambered in other calibers, including the 5.56x45mm.

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The basic [=HK21=] is chambered in 7.62x51mm NATO, though swapping out the barrel, bolt, and ammo feed allows it to be chambered in other calibers, including the 5.56x45mm. \n A .50 BMG version, the HK25, was considered but never went into production.



The PK is a general-purpose machine gun developed early in TheSixties by Mikhail Kalashnikov, more famous for the [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles AK]], after a switch in Soviet tactical doctrine saw the RP-46 mentioned elsewhere on this page declared obsolete. As with most of Kalashnikov's post-war designs, the PK is heavily based on the AK's action, flipped upside-down and modified into an open-bolt weapon that accepts belted ammo. The design has multiple variants for different roles, including the tripod-mounted PKS and the PKT for use in tanks. The original has also been updated twice: the first upgrade came at the tail end of the 60s, producing the better-known PKM, which simplified production and usage and reduced the weight (from 9 kilograms to 7.5 - the original's ''tripod'' is heavier than the PKM), alongside other upgrades and changes such as a strengthened receiver, a non-fluted barrel and a new flash hider. In 2001, the next upgrade came in the form of the PKP "Pecheneg", which switched out the original quick-change barrel with a heavier version that includes an integrated carrying handle; the weapon's weight is more in line with the original PK and is designed primarily for firing from tripod mounts as a support weapon. There is also an unofficial bullpup configuration of the PKP, with the belt box angled nearly 90 degrees backwards to feed into the relocated action (how the shooter [[RightHandedLeftHandedGuns avoids hot brass ejecting directly into their face]] is probably why it's unofficial). The PK and its variants are notable among belt-fed weapons for feeding from the right side and ejecting to the left, rather than the other way around; in video games, however, despite the usual conception that brass ejecting across the player's view is more "dynamic", [=PKs=] will almost invariably [[RightHandedLeftHandedGuns have their model flipped]] to feed from the left like most other belt-fed machine guns, even in games that otherwise never do this.

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The PK is a general-purpose 7.62x54mmR machine gun developed early in TheSixties by Mikhail Kalashnikov, more famous for the [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles AK]], after a switch in Soviet tactical doctrine saw the RP-46 mentioned elsewhere on this page declared obsolete. As with most of Kalashnikov's post-war designs, the PK is heavily based on the AK's action, flipped upside-down and modified into an open-bolt weapon that accepts belted ammo. The design has multiple variants for different roles, including the tripod-mounted PKS and the PKT for use in tanks. The original has also been updated twice: the first upgrade came at the tail end of the 60s, producing the better-known PKM, which simplified production and usage and reduced the weight (from 9 kilograms to 7.5 - the original's ''tripod'' is heavier than the PKM), alongside other upgrades and changes such as a strengthened receiver, a non-fluted barrel and a new flash hider. In 2001, the next upgrade came in the form of the PKP "Pecheneg", which switched out the original quick-change barrel with a heavier version that includes an integrated carrying handle; the weapon's weight is more in line with the original PK and is designed primarily for firing from tripod mounts as a support weapon. There is also an unofficial bullpup configuration of the PKP, with the belt box angled nearly 90 degrees backwards to feed into the relocated action (how the shooter [[RightHandedLeftHandedGuns avoids hot brass ejecting directly into their face]] is probably why it's unofficial). The PK and its variants are notable among belt-fed weapons for feeding from the right side and ejecting to the left, rather than the other way around; in video games, however, despite the usual conception that brass ejecting across the player's view is more "dynamic", [=PKs=] will almost invariably [[RightHandedLeftHandedGuns have their model flipped]] to feed from the left like most other belt-fed machine guns, even in games that otherwise never do this.



The RPK is a Soviet/Russian-made light machine gun, created by none other than Mikhail Kalashnikov. First introduced in the early 1960s, the RPK is based on Kalashnikov's famous AK-47/AKM assault rifle, with modifications to make it more suitable for use as a machine gun, including a longer barrel with a bipod, a strengthened receiver, and a clubfoot stock (some versions, like the Yugoslav version pictured, have a regular AK stock). The weapon can be fed with magazines from the standard AK, a 40 round high capacity magazine, or a 75 round drum magazine.

In 1974, with the introduction of the AK-74 and the switch to the 5.45x39mm round, the RPK was redesigned to chamber the new round as the RPK-74, with further modifications to improve the weapon such as a longer, heavier, chrome-plated barrel and reinforcing steel inserts in the magazine well. Like the original RPK, it can share 30-round magazines from the AK-74, though it is primarily designed for new 45-round magazines (drum mags, supposedly with a capacity of 100, were tested, but only issued in ''very'' limited numbers). It has since been upgraded to use synthetic furniture as the RPK-74M, mirroring the upgraded AK-74M; export variants also exist in the original 7.62mm (the RPKM) and one converted to 5.56mm NATO (the RPK-201).

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The RPK is a Soviet/Russian-made 7.62x39mm light machine gun, created by none other than Mikhail Kalashnikov. First introduced in the early 1960s, the RPK is based on Kalashnikov's famous AK-47/AKM assault rifle, with modifications to make it more suitable for use as a machine gun, including a longer barrel with a bipod, a strengthened receiver, and a clubfoot stock (some versions, like the Yugoslav version pictured, have a regular AK stock). The weapon can be fed with magazines from the standard AK, a 40 round high capacity magazine, or a 75 round drum magazine.

In 1974, with the introduction of the AK-74 and the switch to the 5.45x39mm round, the RPK was redesigned to chamber the new round as the RPK-74, with further modifications to improve the weapon such as a longer, heavier, chrome-plated barrel and reinforcing steel inserts in the magazine well. Like the original RPK, it can share 30-round magazines from the AK-74, though it is primarily designed for new 45-round magazines (drum mags, supposedly with a capacity of 100, were tested, but only issued in ''very'' limited numbers). It has since been upgraded to use synthetic furniture as the RPK-74M, mirroring the upgraded AK-74M; export variants also exist in the original 7.62mm 62x39mm (the RPKM) and one converted to 5.56mm NATO (the RPK-201).



One of the many weapons on this page passed down directly from God via John Browning, the M2 entered service just after WWI and has been the US military's principal heavy support weapon ever since. This .50 caliber 84-pound recoil-operated weapon, known affectionately as "Ma Deuce" during World War II, has been adopted by virtually every Western armed force and can be seen on everything from infantry tripod mounts right up to armoured vehicles, warships and aircraft. It is essentially a scaled-up version of the M1919 machinegun, another Browning design that used smaller caliber .30-06 rounds. The M2 has a rate of fire of 450-575 rounds per minute and sports a distinctive perforated sleeve over the lower barrel as an aid to air cooling; aircraft mounted versions exist with far higher rates of fire, the fastest being the mechanically or electrically boosted AN/M3 which could fire 1,200 rounds per minute. The weapon has an effective range of 1.2 miles when fired from the M3 tripod, and can put shots down over four miles away. During the Vietnam War, a Marine sniper by the name of Carlos Hathcock famously [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_f1TTfqxVUw4/TJgN7hKUcmI/AAAAAAAAByk/9zMoc_ZXn9M/s1600/50bmg914.jpg mounted a scope on one]] and used it for long-range sniper shots, leading to the later development of anti-materiel sniper rifles chambered in the same caliber. Efforts have been underway to develop a replacement with decreased weight and recoil, as the M2 is not exactly portable; candidates included the high-tech [=XM312=] and the [=XM806=], but both have been cancelled because, despite being lighter and more high-tech, neither of them came close to working even half as well as Browning's nearly-century-old masterpiece - the money allocated to those projects was redirected to upgrade the existing M2s to the [=M2A1=] standard. As such, the M2 is likely to remain a common sight for the foreseeable future. In fact, it's commonly said among both the US Army and Marine Corps that the last M2 gunner hasn't been born yet.

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One of the many weapons on this page passed down directly from God via John Browning, the M2 entered service just after WWI and has been the US military's principal heavy support weapon ever since. This .50 caliber 84-pound recoil-operated weapon, known affectionately as "Ma Deuce" during World War II, has been adopted by virtually every Western or NATO-supplied armed force and can be seen on everything from infantry tripod mounts right up to armoured vehicles, warships and aircraft. It is essentially a scaled-up version of the M1919 machinegun, another Browning design that used smaller caliber .30-06 rounds. The M2 has a rate of fire of 450-575 rounds per minute and sports a distinctive perforated sleeve over the lower barrel as an aid to air cooling; aircraft mounted versions exist with far higher rates of fire, the fastest being the mechanically or electrically boosted AN/M3 which could fire 1,200 rounds per minute. The weapon has an effective range of 1.2 miles when fired from the M3 tripod, and can put shots down over four miles away. During the Vietnam War, a Marine sniper by the name of Carlos Hathcock famously [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_f1TTfqxVUw4/TJgN7hKUcmI/AAAAAAAAByk/9zMoc_ZXn9M/s1600/50bmg914.jpg mounted a scope on one]] and used it for long-range sniper shots, leading to the later development of anti-materiel sniper rifles chambered in the same caliber. Efforts have been underway to develop a replacement with decreased weight and recoil, as the M2 is not exactly portable; candidates included the high-tech [=XM312=] and the [=XM806=], but both have been cancelled because, despite being lighter and more high-tech, neither of them came close to working even half as well as Browning's nearly-century-old masterpiece - the money allocated to those projects was redirected to upgrade the existing M2s to the [=M2A1=] standard. As such, the M2 is likely to remain a common sight for the foreseeable future. In fact, it's commonly said among both the US Army and Marine Corps that the last M2 gunner hasn't been born yet.



The M60 was introduced in 1957 as a replacement for the venerable M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle squad automatic weapon and M1919 light machine gun. Drawing on the designs of the [=MG42=] and [[RareGuns FG42]], the designers produced a 23-pound belt-fed general purpose machine gun chambered in 7.62mm NATO. The result is widely regarded as an rather poor weapon; the earlier iterations of the M60 are prone to jamming, have some alarming tendencies to fall apart[[note]]This is why the M60 was one of the few military weapons to actually get ''worse'' over its service life, rather than being improved. The guns literally beat themselves to death over time, which is why there were so many more complaints about it in the 80s and 90s than during the Vietnam War. That, and the fact that design changes to reduce its weight exacerbated the durability problems.[[/note]] or fail to stop firing when the trigger is released,[[note]]Otherwise known as a "runaway gun"[[/note]] features a terribly designed barrel change system (the entire gas piston, barrel, bipod and front sight having to be detached, and without the use of any kind of handle; instead an asbestos-lined glove was issued), and is just as heavy empty as the BAR, itself regarded as quite a hefty weapon. In the end, the "pig" was too heavy for the SAW role, and, at the time, too fragile to be an LMG.

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The M60 was introduced in 1957 as a replacement for the venerable M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle squad automatic weapon and M1919 light machine gun. Drawing on the designs of the [=MG42=] and [[RareGuns FG42]], the designers produced a 23-pound belt-fed general purpose machine gun chambered in 7.62mm 62x51mm NATO. The result is widely regarded as an rather poor weapon; the earlier iterations of the M60 are prone to jamming, have some alarming tendencies to fall apart[[note]]This is why the M60 was one of the few military weapons to actually get ''worse'' over its service life, rather than being improved. The guns literally beat themselves to death over time, which is why there were so many more complaints about it in the 80s and 90s than during the Vietnam War. That, and the fact that design changes to reduce its weight exacerbated the durability problems.[[/note]] or fail to stop firing when the trigger is released,[[note]]Otherwise known as a "runaway gun"[[/note]] features a terribly designed barrel change system (the entire gas piston, barrel, bipod and front sight having to be detached, and without the use of any kind of handle; instead an asbestos-lined glove was issued), and is just as heavy empty as the BAR, itself regarded as quite a hefty weapon. In the end, the "pig" was too heavy for the SAW role, and, at the time, too fragile to be an LMG.



Literally the grandfather of them all, the Maxim was the first “true” machine gun that we would recognise. Developed by Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim, an American-born British inventor, whose attempts to make a fortune via invention in America early on failed until he was [[BeamMeUpScotty (allegedly)]] told that if he wanted to make money he should “Invent something to help those damn-fool Europeans cut their throats more efficiently”. He noticed that when a gun fired, it produced recoil, and rather than seeing this as a nuisance he realized that this could be used to force the spent cartridge out of the gun and load a new one. [[MoreDakka Over 600 times a minute in fact.]] At least one version allegedly had a rate of fire of [[NumberOfTheBeast 666]] rounds per minute, leading to the nickname "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Devil's Paintbrush]]". So he made a water-cooled tripod mounted belt fed weapon and went to Europe and tried without much success to sell the idea. Then he came to Britain, where they had been having a spot of bother pacifying the natives in… [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire well in most of the world,]] and they liked the gun so much they knighted him. Suddenly the rest of the world decided they wanted the gun too. The Maxim became pretty much the standard machine gun of the world before the first World War and largely continued to be so throughout said war in the static role, with a good amount of variants, derivatives and plain old copies coming out of its initial design from nations all over the world, seeing service in both world wars, the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar, the UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar, the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar and into the early days of UsefulNotes/VietnamWar.

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Literally the grandfather of them all, the Maxim was the first “true” machine gun that we would recognise. Developed by Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim, an American-born British inventor, whose attempts to make a fortune via invention in America early on failed until he was [[BeamMeUpScotty (allegedly)]] told that if he wanted to make money he should “Invent something to help those damn-fool Europeans cut their throats more efficiently”. He noticed that when a gun fired, it produced recoil, and rather than seeing this as a nuisance he realized that this could be used to force the spent cartridge out of the gun and load a new one. [[MoreDakka Over 600 times a minute in fact.]] At least one version allegedly had a rate of fire of [[NumberOfTheBeast 666]] rounds per minute, leading to the nickname "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Devil's Paintbrush]]". So he made a water-cooled tripod mounted belt fed weapon and went to Europe and tried without much success to sell the idea. Then he came to Britain, where they had been having a spot of bother pacifying the natives in… [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire well in most of the world,]] and they liked the their new .303 machine gun so much they knighted him. Suddenly the rest of the world decided they wanted the gun too. The Maxim became pretty much the standard machine gun of the world before the first World War and largely continued to be so throughout said war in the static role, with a good amount of variants, derivatives and plain old copies coming out of its initial design from nations all over the world, world in every full-size rifle caliber imaginable, seeing service in both world wars, the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar, the UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar, the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar and even into the early days of UsefulNotes/VietnamWar.
UsefulNotes/VietnamWar in the case of the Russian variants.



At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the [=MG34=], which first saw combat in the Spanish Civil War. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed.

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. Switching between a bipod and tripod in an emergency required no special tools, thanks to the mounting latch being spring-loaded. The [=MG42=] was so good, in fact, that Allied soldiers who were lucky enough to capture one would quickly swap their Brens or [=BARs=] for the "Spandau" until they ran out of ammo for it.

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At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the 7.92mm [=MG34=], which first saw combat in the Spanish Civil War. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed.

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm 92x57mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. Switching between a bipod and tripod in an emergency required no special tools, thanks to the mounting latch being spring-loaded. The [=MG42=] was so good, in fact, that Allied soldiers who were lucky enough to capture one would quickly swap their Brens or [=BARs=] for the "Spandau" until they ran out of ammo for it.



The RPD is the world's first SAW, or Squad Automatic Weapon. It fires an intermediate caliber 7.62x39 round, the same round fired by the SKS, AK-47, AKM and many other weapons. Developed near the end of World War 2 by Vasily Degtyaryov, and accepted into Soviet service in 1944. It saw limited use in the last days of WW2, and was replaced by AK-pattern weapons in the 1960s, though it has gone on to serve with distinction throughout the world, prominently seeing action in Korea and Vietnam.

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The RPD is the world's first SAW, or Squad Automatic Weapon. It fires an intermediate caliber 7.62x39 62x39mm round, the same round fired by the SKS, AK-47, AKM and many other weapons. Developed near the end of World War 2 by Vasily Degtyaryov, and accepted into Soviet service in 1944. It saw limited use in the last days of WW2, and was replaced by AK-pattern weapons in the 1960s, though it has gone on to serve with distinction throughout the world, prominently seeing action in Korea and Vietnam.
11th May '17 3:10:01 PM leonarth
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* The Vickers and Maxim variants appear all over the place in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.

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* The Vickers and Maxim variants appear all over gun appears as mounted weapon in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' and can be found both on fixed emplacements and on the place in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.Zeppelin.



* The Vickers and Maxim variants appear all over the place in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.

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* The Vickers and Maxim variants appear all over the place is used by british vehicles in ''VideoGame/Battlefield1''.
10th May '17 1:26:50 AM TheWildWestPyro
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The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. The machine gun was so good, in fact, that Allied soldiers who were lucky enough to capture one would quickly swap their Brens or [=BARs=] for the "Spandau".

to:

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. Switching between a bipod and tripod in an emergency required no special tools, thanks to the mounting latch being spring-loaded. The machine gun [=MG42=] was so good, in fact, that Allied soldiers who were lucky enough to capture one would quickly swap their Brens or [=BARs=] for the "Spandau".
"Spandau" until they ran out of ammo for it.
10th May '17 1:24:51 AM TheWildWestPyro
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_66.jpeg]]
At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the [=MG34=]. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed.

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed.

Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only seven seconds at longest thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather than distinct individual shots,[[note]]The [=MG42's=] rate of fire, averaging 1,200 rounds per minute but sometimes reaching 1,500 depending on the weight of the individual weapon's bolt, is too high for the human ear to discern the individual shots.[[/note]] leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying. The [=MG42=] was the basis of some of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=],[[note]]Four variants of the [=MG1=] were built from the ground up, with changes to the original design including recalibrated sights for the different round, a chrome-lined barrel, and modifications to the bolt depending on the exact model; the [=MG2=] was made simply by taking wartime [=MG42=]s and rechambering them to 7.62mm NATO.[[/note]] and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but these wouldn't even cycle after the first shot because [[WhatAnIdiot the designers failed to account for the difference in size]] between .30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) and 7.92x57mm Mauser. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_66.org/pmwiki/pub/images/unknown_1_99.jpeg]]
At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the [=MG34=].[=MG34=], which first saw combat in the Spanish Civil War. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed.

designed.

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed.

feed. The machine gun was so good, in fact, that Allied soldiers who were lucky enough to capture one would quickly swap their Brens or [=BARs=] for the "Spandau".

Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only seven seconds at longest thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather than distinct individual shots,[[note]]The [=MG42's=] rate of fire, averaging 1,200 rounds per minute but sometimes reaching 1,500 depending on the weight of the individual weapon's bolt, is too high for the human ear to discern the individual shots.[[/note]] leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying.terrifying, and the fantastic suppressive fire it created . The [=MG42=] was the basis of some of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=],[[note]]Four variants of the [=MG1=] were built from the ground up, with changes to the original design including recalibrated sights for the different round, a chrome-lined barrel, and modifications to the bolt depending on the exact model; the [=MG2=] was made simply by taking wartime [=MG42=]s and rechambering them to 7.62mm NATO.[[/note]] and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but these wouldn't even cycle after the first shot because [[WhatAnIdiot the designers failed to account for the difference in size]] between .30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) and 7.92x57mm Mauser. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.
10th May '17 1:14:59 AM TheWildWestPyro
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The M1919 has been used and manufactured by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas European ones go with 7.92x57mm Mauser[[note]]Belgium was conquered and made weapons for the Germans until it was liberated in 1945.[[/note]] captured Soviet ones go with 7.62x54mmR , Argentinians used the 7.65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7.5x54mm French.[[note]]At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=]; after the war, most were using 7.62mm NATO or 7.62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations.[[/note]]

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The M1919 has been used and manufactured by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas European ones go with 7.92x57mm Mauser[[note]]Belgium was conquered and made weapons for the Germans until it was liberated in 1945.[[/note]] [[/note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7.62x54mmR , Argentinians used the 7.65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7.5x54mm French.[[note]]At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=]; after the war, most were using 7.62mm NATO or 7.62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations.[[/note]]
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