History CoolGuns / MachineGuns

19th Nov '17 8:19:20 PM garthvader
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Easily recognized by its distinctive top-mounted removable box magazine, the Bren was adapted from the Czechoslovak [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZB_vz._26 ZB vz. 26]], with its caliber changed to the standard .303 British round. The name "Bren" is a contraction of "Brno" (where the Czechoslovak original was developed) and "Enfield" (where the British version was adapted). While it was still magazine-fed instead of belt-fed, it used larger 30-round magazines and the top-mounted magazines were much quicker to change and more reliable, especially when firing prone. The weapon's low rate of fire (500-520 rpm) allowed it to keep firing for much longer, while changing an overheated barrel was quite simple. The Bren was also renown for its accuracy, so much that some soldiers considered it ''too'' accurate for the suppressive fire role[[note]]There are stories of some Bren guns used up to the Persian Gulf War that had their barrels deliberately damaged to reduce the accuracy so they could properly suppress enemies. Later versions had their barrels modified to give it a wider cone of fire[[/note]].

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Easily recognized by its distinctive top-mounted removable box magazine, the Bren was adapted from the Czechoslovak [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZB_vz._26 ZB vz. 26]], with its caliber changed to the standard .303 British round. The name "Bren" is a contraction of "Brno" (where the Czechoslovak original was developed) and "Enfield" (where the British version was adapted). While it was still magazine-fed instead of belt-fed, it used larger 30-round magazines and the top-mounted magazines were much quicker to change and more reliable, especially when firing prone. The weapon's low rate of fire (500-520 rpm) allowed it to keep firing for much longer, while changing an overheated barrel was quite simple. The Bren was also renown for its accuracy, so much that some soldiers considered there is a persistent myth that it was ''too'' accurate for the suppressive fire role[[note]]There are stories of some Bren guns used up to the Persian Gulf War that had their barrels deliberately damaged to reduce the accuracy so they could properly suppress enemies. Later versions had their barrels modified to give it a wider cone of fire[[/note]]. accurate.
19th Nov '17 7:47:08 AM garthvader
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The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was often removed after it was discovered to be unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.

to:

The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was often removed after it was later discovered to be unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.
19th Nov '17 7:04:14 AM dlchen145
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The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was later discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.

to:

The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was later often removed after it was discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.
19th Nov '17 4:04:35 AM garthvader
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The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket (absent on aircraft versions, and often removed by troops in the field to save weight, since the gun was found to function fine without it). The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.

to:

The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket (absent on aircraft versions, and often removed by jacket, which was later discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the field to save weight, since the gun was found to function fine without it).Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.
10th Nov '17 8:59:13 AM dlchen145
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The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible .30-06 version of the Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was later discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. The gun was lighter than many other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.

to:

The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible .30-06 version of the terrible Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive forced-air cooling barrel jacket, which was later discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground jacket (absent on aircraft versions, and often removed by troops in the Second World War.field to save weight, since the gun was found to function fine without it). The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. The At 28 pounds, the gun was quite heavy, but still lighter than many most other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.
10th Nov '17 8:30:49 AM garthvader
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[[caption-width-right:350: Top: Lewis Gun with cooling jacket, Bottom: Japanese Type 92 aircraft gun, an aircooled Lewis derivative]]
The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible .30-06 version of the Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive, tubular barrel shroud that cooled the gun via air. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. The gun was lighter than many other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.

to:

[[caption-width-right:350: Top: Lewis Gun with cooling jacket, Bottom: Japanese Type 92 Lewis aircraft gun, an aircooled a direct-aircooled Lewis derivative]]
The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_gun Lewis Gun]] was a light machine gun designed by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (hence the name "Lewis Gun") but passed over for adoption by US forces due to political disagreements between Lewis and General William Crozier, the chief of ordnance for the American Expeditionary Forces.[[note]]The disagreements were so bad that during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the US army actually ''took away'' .30-06 Lewis guns from troops who already had them in favor of the [[WhatAnIdiot utterly terrible .30-06 version of the Chauchat.]][[/note]] Frustrated, Lewis resigned and went to Belgium, and later, the UK, where the armies of both nations adopted it and the British Army agreed to manufacture it in 1914 (in 1917, the US Marines and Navy also finally adopted the design as well). The Lewis is easily recognized by the pan magazine on top and the massive, tubular massive forced-air cooling barrel shroud that cooled jacket, which was later discovered to be totally unnecessary when old aircraft-mounted Lewis guns were issued to ground troops in the gun via air.Second World War. The magazine of the infantry version held 47 rounds of .303 British rifle ammunition (or .30-06 Springfield ammunition for the Americans), while those fitted to the planes of the Royal Flying Corps utilized larger 97-round pans. The gun was lighter than many other machine guns of the period -- light enough to be carried by one man -- and very reliable. The Lewis's rate of fire was around 500-600 rounds per minute, and although it was a bit hard to reload (due to the pan magazine), the British Army loved it enough for it not only to be used throughout the entire first World War, but by all three services in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[note]] The Lewis also proved to be a very useful anti-air weapon against low-flying planes [[/note]], serving alongside the Bren Gun in the Home Guard, and wouldn't be retired for good until after the Korean War. The UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar also saw heavy use of the Lewis Gun. 800 were delivered and used by the International Brigades, especially with the British battalions, as WW1 veterans serving in the Brigades were familiar with its use. The Lewis Gun is also particularly famous in Australia as the weapon used in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War an infamously disastrous attempt]] to curb the emu population in 1932.
10th Nov '17 7:18:54 AM dlchen145
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* The original M60 and the Mk 43 are usable in ''VideoGame/TheDivision''.
10th Nov '17 7:18:23 AM dlchen145
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Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning.

to:

Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where while the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning.



* The M249 and Mk 46 appear as usable weapons in ''VideoGame/TheDivision''.



* The RPK-74 is usable in ''VideoGame/TheDivision'', with both wooden and synthetic furniture.



In the 1990s, the [=M60E4=] was released, by which time advances in technology and manufacturing techniques allowed for noticeable improvements in both weight ''and'' reliability, rather than having to sacrifice one to improve the other as with the E3, but by then the weapon had mostly been phased out by the US military in favor of the M240.[[note]]The only branch of the US military that still uses the M60 is the Navy Special Operations Forces, who favor the lighter weight and portability of recent versions compared to the larger, heavier M240. Most other branches are currently looking towards the Mk 48 Mod 0, a 7.62mm conversion of the Mk 46 (a system based on the below M249) which is still lighter and more reliable than modern M60 variants.[[/note]] In 2014, a further improved version, the [=M60E6=], was released, and subsequently adopted by the Danish Army as their new standard GPMG, replacing the Rheinmetall [=MG3=], so it seems that the M60's military career may not be over quite yet.

to:

In the 1990s, the [=M60E4=] (or Mk 43) was released, by which time advances in technology and manufacturing techniques allowed for noticeable improvements in both weight ''and'' reliability, rather than having to sacrifice one to improve the other as with the E3, but by then the weapon had mostly been phased out by the US military in favor of the M240.[[note]]The only branch of the US military that still uses the M60 is the Navy Special Operations Forces, who favor the lighter weight and portability of recent versions compared to the larger, heavier M240. Most other branches are currently looking towards the Mk 48 Mod 0, a 7.62mm conversion of the Mk 46 (a system based on the below M249) which is still lighter and more reliable than modern M60 variants.[[/note]] In 2014, a further improved version, the [=M60E6=], was released, and subsequently adopted by the Danish Army as their new standard GPMG, replacing the Rheinmetall [=MG3=], so it seems that the M60's military career may not be over quite yet.


Added DiffLines:

* The original M60 and the Mk 43 are usable in ''VideoGame/TheDivision''.
9th Nov '17 11:47:06 AM dlchen145
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[[folder:General Electric [=M134=] Electric Gatling "Minigun"]]

to:

[[folder:General Electric [=M134=] Electric Gatling "Minigun"]]
9th Nov '17 11:46:06 AM dlchen145
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[[folder:General Dynamics GAU-19]]

to:

[[folder:General Dynamics GAU-19]]
[=GAU-19=]]]
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