History CoolGuns / MachineGuns

28th Jun '16 9:01:08 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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Proof that even John Moses Browning's failures could still be incredibly successful, the BAR was originally designed as a "walking fire" gun, a WW1 concept for an automatic weapon that could be fired from the hip by a soldier crossing no man's land to support his comrades. However, the BAR ended up a bit ahead of its time. Chambered for the same .30-06 ammunition as standard-issue rifles, the weapon was too cumbersome and unwieldy for its intended application. (It would only be when "intermediate" cartridges appeared decades later for [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles assault rifles]] that the original idea behind the BAR became feasible.) Being twice the weight of an M1 Garand and in post-1918 models almost ''thrice'' the weight of usual bolt-action rifles in .30-06; it was instead employed initially as a light machine gun, used to give the infantry squad additional firepower and range. Despite being widely adopted, it had a number of flaws as a support weapon; in particular, it lacked any facility for changing barrels quickly[[note]]aside from some of the later European versions that did have quick-change barrels, as well as pistol-grip stocks[[/note]] or accepting a belt feed, instead only able to use 20-round box magazines. On top of that it was too ''light'' a weapon to use in this role - controlling it while firing fully automatic was pretty difficult. This effectively made it a very heavy battle rifle rather than a true light machine gun, and as such, was essentially the pioneer of the Squad Automatic Weapon concept. It was in this role that the BAR truly shined, with the platoon-level LMG duties being given to another Browning design, the M1919 light machine gun, while the BAR was issued at the squad-level by the Army and the fire team-level by the Marines. It continued in service with the US military right into the Vietnam war, eventually being replaced by the M60; the US National Guard continued to use it into the 70s, and some countries continued to use the BAR all the way into the 1990s. The modern FN MAG/M240 is also based in part on the BAR's action, except flipped upside down and adapted to belt-feed using an [=MG42=]-derived top plate.

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Proof that even John Moses Browning's failures could still be incredibly successful, the BAR was originally designed as a "walking fire" gun, a WW1 concept for an automatic weapon that could be fired from the hip by a soldier crossing no man's land to support his comrades. However, the BAR ended up a bit ahead of its time. Chambered for the same .30-06 ammunition as standard-issue rifles, the weapon was too cumbersome and unwieldy for its intended application. (It would only be when "intermediate" cartridges appeared decades later for [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles assault rifles]] that the original idea behind the BAR became feasible.) Being twice the weight of an M1 Garand and in post-1918 models almost ''thrice'' the weight of usual bolt-action rifles in .30-06; it was instead employed initially as a light machine gun, used to give the infantry squad additional firepower and range.range.

Despite being widely adopted, it had a number of flaws as a support weapon; in particular, it lacked any facility for changing barrels quickly[[note]]aside from some of the later European versions that did have quick-change barrels, as well as pistol-grip stocks[[/note]] or accepting a belt feed, instead only able to use 20-round box magazines. On top of that it was too ''light'' a weapon to use in this role - controlling it while firing fully automatic was pretty difficult. This effectively made it a very heavy battle rifle rather than a true light machine gun, and as such, was essentially the pioneer of the Squad Automatic Weapon concept. It was in this role that the BAR truly shined, with the platoon-level LMG duties being given to another Browning design, the M1919 light machine gun, while the BAR was issued at the squad-level by the Army and the fire team-level by the Marines. It continued in service with the US military right into the Vietnam war, eventually being replaced by the M60; the US National Guard continued to use it into the 70s, and some countries continued to use the BAR all the way into the 1990s. The modern FN MAG/M240 is also based in part on the BAR's action, except flipped upside down and adapted to belt-feed using an [=MG42=]-derived top plate.



The light machine gun of choice for the Red Army in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Just like the BAR and M26 above, it more or less is a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot machine-rifle]]. It has a distinct round horizontal-mounted pan (ie flat drum) magazine owing to the need to reliably fire the standard Russian 7.62x54R cartridge, giving it a very distinct look (and a significantly higher magazine capacity than box-fed machine guns, at 47 rounds). It also has exceptional reliability and a high tolerance for dirt, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in tests it fired even after being buried in sand and mud]]. That said, there were still some issues with the weapon - in particular the bipod was flimsy enough that it would often break when fired. Its recoil spring was also wrapped around the gas piston directly under the barrel, which could cause it to lose temper and cause feed issues with the weapon when overheated; this was partially acknowledged with a rate of fire of 550 rounds per minute, [[BoringButPractical which also eliminated the need for a changeable barrel]]. In addition, the pan magazines, which were the only type found to reliably feed the 7.62x54mmR cartridge, were rather heavy and prone to being damaged, but at the same time weren't all that effective for sustained fire like contemporary belt-fed weapons the opposing German or allied American armies used. Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock. The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.

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The light machine gun of choice for the Red Army in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Just like the BAR and M26 above, it more or less is a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot machine-rifle]]. It has a distinct round horizontal-mounted pan (ie flat drum) magazine owing to the need to reliably fire the standard Russian 7.62x54R cartridge, giving it a very distinct look (and a significantly higher magazine capacity than box-fed machine guns, at 47 rounds). It also has exceptional reliability and a high tolerance for dirt, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in tests it fired over 500 rounds even after being buried in sand and mud]]. That said, there were still some issues with the weapon - in particular the bipod was flimsy enough that it would often break when fired. Its recoil spring was also wrapped around the gas piston directly under the barrel, which could cause it to lose temper and cause feed issues with the weapon when overheated; this was partially acknowledged with a rate of fire of 550 rounds per minute, [[BoringButPractical which also eliminated the need for a changeable barrel]]. In addition, the pan magazines, which were the only type found to reliably feed the 7.62x54mmR cartridge, were rather heavy and prone to being damaged, but at the same time weren't all that effective for sustained fire like contemporary belt-fed weapons the opposing German or allied American armies used.

Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock. The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.
26th Jun '16 1:31:50 PM Kadorhal
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One of the many weapons designed by legendary firearms designer John Moses Browning, the air-cooled recoil-operated M1919 entered service in (duh) 1919, and has seen action in about every war ever since, from World War II to the still-ongoing Syrian Civil War. It is the FN MAG's grandfather, sharing many similarities; used for nearly everything (the M1919 is used for infantry support, aircraft armament, anti-air emplacement, machine gun positions, and tank-mounted coaxial and/or turret guns)and has a reputation for nigh-indestructibility (i.e the MAG and the M1919 ''always'' work). The fact that both are mainstays for US service for their respective eras (the M1919 until 1990, and the MAG beyond that) doesn't hurt either.

The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm Mauser [[note]] Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[/note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations[[/note]].

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One of the many weapons designed by legendary firearms designer John Moses Browning, the air-cooled recoil-operated M1919 entered service in (duh) 1919, and has seen action in about every war ever since, from World War II to the still-ongoing Syrian Civil War. It is the FN MAG's grandfather, sharing many similarities; used for nearly everything (the M1919 is used for infantry support, aircraft armament, anti-air emplacement, machine gun positions, and tank-mounted coaxial and/or turret guns)and guns) and has a reputation for nigh-indestructibility (i.e the MAG and the M1919 ''always'' work). The fact that both are mainstays for US service for their respective eras (the M1919 until 1990, and the MAG beyond that) doesn't hurt either.

The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm 7.92x57mm Mauser [[note]] Remember [[note]]Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[/note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR 7.62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm 7.65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm 7.5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], [=WWII=]; after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm 7.62mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR 7.62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations[[/note]].



* The titular tank in ''Fury'' has two M1919s.
* ''All over the place'' in ''VideoGame/CallofDuty'' (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.

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* The titular tank in ''Fury'' ''Film/{{Fury|2014}}'' has two M1919s.
* ''All over the place'' in ''VideoGame/CallofDuty'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.heavily. Multiple levels in ''World at War'' in particular start the player with one.






Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only 3-7 seconds thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound [[note]] The MG42's rate of fire is too high for the human ear to discern individual shots it makes.[[/note]]rather than distinct individual shots, leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying. The [=MG42=] was the basis of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=][[note]]one model, the [=MG2=], was in fact made from simply taking wartime [=MG42s=] and converting them to 7.62mm NATO[[/note]], and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but they [[WhatAnIdiot didn't account for .30-06 Springfield being longer[[note]]7.62x63mm[[/note]] than 7.92x57mm Mauser and didn't realize that was why the conversion failed to cycle properly]]. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.
* Every World War II game, movie, or otherwise, features this gun. Except if ThoseWackyNazis don't make an appearance- like in the Pacific theater for example.

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Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent (though taking only 3-7 seconds thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound [[note]] The rather than distinct individual shots,[[note]]The MG42's rate of fire fire, averaging 1,200 rounds per minute but sometimes reaching 1,500 depending on the weight of the individual weapon's bolt, is too high for the human ear to discern individual shots it makes.[[/note]]rather than distinct individual shots, [[/note]] leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying. The [=MG42=] was the basis of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=][[note]]one model, the [=MG2=], was in fact made from simply taking wartime [=MG42s=] and converting them to 7.62mm NATO[[/note]], and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but they these wouldn't even cycle after the first shot because [[WhatAnIdiot didn't the designers failed to account for .for the difference in size]] between .30-06 Springfield being longer[[note]]7.Springfield[[note]]7.62x63mm[[/note]] than and 7.92x57mm Mauser and didn't realize that was why the conversion failed to cycle properly]].Mauser. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.
* Every World War II game, movie, or otherwise, otherwise that is set in the European theatre, features this gun. Except if ThoseWackyNazis don't make an appearance- like in gun.
* The WWII-based ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, with their usual focus on Europe, feature
the Pacific theater for example.weapon extensively, commonly mounted at every position the Germans are holding, also able to be used handheld with a drum mag in ''World at War''.



* The only weapon to appear with its real name ''VideoGame/PerfectDark Zero''. Oddly, the usual belt-box is replaced by a belt of only 7 rounds that [[BottomlessMagazines somehow lasts for 80 shots without decreasing in length]].

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* The only weapon to appear with its real name in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark Zero''. Oddly, the usual belt-box is replaced by a belt of only 7 rounds that [[BottomlessMagazines somehow lasts for 80 shots without decreasing in length]].



* Available in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty 4'', both as an infantry weapon and a mounted gun. ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 3'' features the Mk 46[[labelnote:*]]actually an M249 Para with the Mk 46's rails, but same difference for the most part[[/labelnote]], this time solely as an infantry weapon, and ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' has the Mk 48 in the same role.

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* Available in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty 4'', both as an infantry weapon and a mounted gun. ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 3'' features the Mk 46[[labelnote:*]]actually an M249 Para with the Mk 46's rails, but same difference for the most part[[/labelnote]], this time solely as an infantry weapon, and ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' has the up-chambered Mk 48 in the same role.



* The M249 is the signature machine gun of the ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series, showing up in every game in some form.
** It's one of the most powerful weapons in the original game, the signature weapon of Richard Crowe, and can be looted from him after killing him in the final confrontation with him. A few of the regular mercs under his command start using it at the end of the game as well.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' uses it in both handheld and mounted forms. It's more commonly mounted at checkpoints and on technicals in the first act of the game, with the PKM being more common as a handheld weapon; in Act 2 this reverses, with the handheld M249 being available for purchase after doing one mission for the Arms Dealer, while the mounted ones quickly give way to the M2 and Mark 19.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and ''VideoGame/FarCry4'' feature the "MKG", essentially an M249 redesigned so its large belt-boxes feed into the STANAG magwell like a regular box magazine. Once again, it's in both handheld and mounted variations, the former being stashed away until the second half of the game and the latter more common before the [=DShK=] takes over.



* Available in ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' as the first hand-held machine gun available for purchase. As above, since the game is all about flipping the guns' models, the PKM is flipped to feed from the left like the M249. ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and ''[[VideoGame/FarCry4 4]]'' also both feature the PKM, now properly feeding from the right and fitted with a Blackheart International SOPMOD kit to facilitate modifications (which it doesn't get in singleplayer).

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* Available in ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' as the first hand-held machine gun available for purchase. As above, since the game is all about flipping the guns' models, the PKM is flipped to feed from the left like the M249. ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and ''[[VideoGame/FarCry4 4]]'' also both feature the PKM, now properly feeding from the right and fitted with a Blackheart International SOPMOD kit to facilitate modifications (which it doesn't get in singleplayer).singleplayer, other than an unremovable vertical grip).
26th Jun '16 3:21:08 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the [=MG34=]. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed. The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent, though taking only 3-7 seconds thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel, and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather than distinct individual shots, leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying. The [=MG42=] was the basis of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=][[note]]one model, the [=MG2=], was in fact made from simply taking wartime [=MG42s=] and converting them to 7.62mm NATO[[/note]], and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but [[WhatAnIdiot neglected to redesign the receiver to account for that round being 6 millimeters longer than the 7.92mm Mauser]] and [[TooDumbToLive didn't realize this was why the .30-06 conversion wouldn't cycle]]. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.
* Every World War II game, movie, or otherwise, features this gun.

to:

At the beginning of the Second World War, the Germans were mostly equipped with the [=MG34=]. While a truly excellent machine gun in its own right, the [=MG34=] was really ''too'' good; it was labour-intensive, expensive, and took a long time to manufacture. The [=MG34=] also proved to be less rugged than expected, due to the very tight design tolerances. This resulted in a total redesign being ordered with mass production as the primary goal, and the end product is widely regarded as one of the best machine guns ever designed.

The [=MG42=] made extensive use of pressed and stamped steel parts to cut down on cost and production times, and used a recoil operated, roller-locked mechanism augmented by a gas recoil booster which increased both reliability and rate of fire; the resulting weapon was distinctly more rugged than the rather finicky [=MG34=]. The [=MG42=] remains one of the fastest-firing single-barrel weapons to not require external power, able to fire 7.92mm Mauser rounds at an average of 1,200 RPM. A true general-purpose machine gun, it could be used in the light machine gun role with a 50-round drum magazine and bipod, or the medium role with a tripod and belt feed. feed.

Its main drawbacks stemmed from the gigantic rate of fire; it was incredibly loud, barrel changes were frequent, though frequent (though taking only 3-7 seconds thanks to a superbly designed quick-change barrel, barrel) and ammunition consumption was very high even when all efforts were made to conserve it. The huge rate of fire also made the gun's report extremely distinctive, described by troops who faced it as a buzzing or tearing sound rather [[note]] The MG42's rate of fire is too high for the human ear to discern individual shots it makes.[[/note]]rather than distinct individual shots, leading to nicknames like "Hitler's Buzzsaw". This had its advantages, as the noise was quite terrifying. The [=MG42=] was the basis of Germany's later machine guns following the war, from the [=MG1=] to the modern [=MG3=][[note]]one model, the [=MG2=], was in fact made from simply taking wartime [=MG42s=] and converting them to 7.62mm NATO[[/note]], and along with the [=FG42=] was also the basis of the American M60. The US also attempted to make a .30-06 version of the [=MG42=] for testing, but they [[WhatAnIdiot neglected to redesign the receiver to didn't account for that round for .30-06 Springfield being 6 millimeters longer longer[[note]]7.62x63mm[[/note]] than the 7.92mm Mauser]] 92x57mm Mauser and [[TooDumbToLive didn't realize this that was why the .30-06 the conversion wouldn't cycle]].failed to cycle properly]]. The [=MG3=] is so similar (and externally almost identical) to the [=MG42=] that they have many interchangeable parts.
* Every World War II game, movie, or otherwise, features this gun. Except if ThoseWackyNazis don't make an appearance- like in the Pacific theater for example.



The M60 was introduced in 1957 as a replacement for the venerable M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle squad automatic weapon and M1919 light machine gun. Drawing on the designs of the [=MG42=] and [[RareGuns FG42]], the designers produced a 23-pound belt-fed general purpose machine gun chambered in 7.62mm NATO. The result is widely regarded as an rather poor weapon; the earlier iterations of the M60 are prone to jamming, have some alarming tendencies to fall apart[[note]]This is why the M60 was one of the few military weapons to actually get ''worse'' over its service life, rather than being improved. The guns literally beat themselves to death over time, which is why there were so many more complaints about it in the 80s and 90s than during the Vietnam War. That, and the fact that design changes to reduce its weight exacerbated the durability problems.[[/note]] or fail to stop firing when the trigger is released[[note]]Otherwise known as a "runaway gun"[[/note]], features a terribly designed barrel change system (the entire gas piston, barrel, bipod and front sight having to be detached, and without the use of any kind of handle; instead an asbestos-lined glove was issued), and is just as heavy empty as the BAR, itself regarded as quite a hefty weapon. In the end, the "pig" was too heavy for the SAW role, and (until recently) too fragile to be an LMG. The M60 is also notable for being the only weapon for which the US Army designated the ''receiver'' (the main body of the gun, containing the moving parts) as a replaceable part; with every other gun a broken receiver meant the rest would be stripped for spare parts. The weight earned it the nicknames "pig" and "hog" in Vietnam, and attempts to reduce the weapon's weight resulted in the even ''less'' well-received [=M60E3=] version. By the 1990s, the FN M249 (which has had its own set of problems) had replaced it as the US military's Squad Automatic Weapon, while the M240 (which is renowned for being nigh-unjammable and only slightly more fragile than adamantium, despite being rather unwieldy), also from FN, was rapidly taking over the light/general-purpose machine gun niche. In 2000, the [=M60E4=] was released, by which time advances in technology and manufacturing techniques allowed for noticeable improvements in both weight ''and'' reliability, rather than having to sacrifice one to improve the other as with the E3, but by then the weapon had mostly been phased out by the US military in favor of the M240.[[note]]The only branch of the US military that still uses the M60 is the Navy Special Operations Forces, who favor the lighter weight and portability of recent versions compared to the larger, heavier M240. Most other branches are currently looking towards the Mk 48 Mod 0, a 7.62mm conversion of the Mk 46 (a system based on the below M249) which is still lighter and more reliable than modern M60 variants.[[/note]] In 2014, a further improved version, the [=M60E6=], was released, and subsequently adopted by the Danish Army as their new standard GPMG, replacing the Rheinmetall [=MG3=], so it seems that the M60's military career may not be over quite yet. Despite its troubled history, the weapon's brawny appearance and easy availability made it hugely popular in '80s and '90s action movies, with the depiction in ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' particularly iconic.

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The M60 was introduced in 1957 as a replacement for the venerable M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle squad automatic weapon and M1919 light machine gun. Drawing on the designs of the [=MG42=] and [[RareGuns FG42]], the designers produced a 23-pound belt-fed general purpose machine gun chambered in 7.62mm NATO. The result is widely regarded as an rather poor weapon; the earlier iterations of the M60 are prone to jamming, have some alarming tendencies to fall apart[[note]]This is why the M60 was one of the few military weapons to actually get ''worse'' over its service life, rather than being improved. The guns literally beat themselves to death over time, which is why there were so many more complaints about it in the 80s and 90s than during the Vietnam War. That, and the fact that design changes to reduce its weight exacerbated the durability problems.[[/note]] or fail to stop firing when the trigger is released[[note]]Otherwise known as a "runaway gun"[[/note]], features a terribly designed barrel change system (the entire gas piston, barrel, bipod and front sight having to be detached, and without the use of any kind of handle; instead an asbestos-lined glove was issued), and is just as heavy empty as the BAR, itself regarded as quite a hefty weapon. In the end, the "pig" was too heavy for the SAW role, and (until recently) too fragile to be an LMG.

The M60 is also notable for being the only weapon for which the US Army designated the ''receiver'' (the main body of the gun, containing the moving parts) as a replaceable part; with every other gun a broken receiver meant the rest would be stripped for spare parts. The weight earned it the nicknames "pig" and "hog" in Vietnam, and attempts to reduce the weapon's weight resulted in the even ''less'' well-received [=M60E3=] version. By the 1990s, the FN M249 (which has had its own set of problems) had replaced it as the US military's Squad Automatic Weapon, while the M240 (which is renowned for being nigh-unjammable and only slightly more fragile than adamantium, despite being rather unwieldy), also from FN, was rapidly taking over the light/general-purpose machine gun niche.

In 2000, the [=M60E4=] was released, by which time advances in technology and manufacturing techniques allowed for noticeable improvements in both weight ''and'' reliability, rather than having to sacrifice one to improve the other as with the E3, but by then the weapon had mostly been phased out by the US military in favor of the M240.[[note]]The only branch of the US military that still uses the M60 is the Navy Special Operations Forces, who favor the lighter weight and portability of recent versions compared to the larger, heavier M240. Most other branches are currently looking towards the Mk 48 Mod 0, a 7.62mm conversion of the Mk 46 (a system based on the below M249) which is still lighter and more reliable than modern M60 variants.[[/note]] In 2014, a further improved version, the [=M60E6=], was released, and subsequently adopted by the Danish Army as their new standard GPMG, replacing the Rheinmetall [=MG3=], so it seems that the M60's military career may not be over quite yet.

Despite its troubled history, the weapon's brawny appearance and easy availability made it hugely popular in '80s and '90s action movies, with the depiction in ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' particularly iconic.


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The Bren also has two Japanese cousins- the Type 96 and Type 99 which use different cartridges; the 96 went with 6.5x50mm Arisaka while the 99 went with 7.7x58mm Arisaka. Unlike the Bren, the Japanese took advantage of the accuracy of the gun, laying extremely deadly storm of bullets from concealed positions (it was said that in Iwo Jima several concealed gunners downed a fire team or two) as well as fitting a special 2,5x scope to create, essentialy, an '''''automatic sniper rifle'''''. However, the Type 96 had a problematic feature; it's oil pump, intended to ensure reliable feeding, sucks up dirt and grime like a vacuum cleaner, making it prone to jamming. The Type 99 lacks the oil pump and it's problems.
21st Jun '16 1:11:11 PM dlchen145
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* ''Fanfic/FeatheredHeart'' gives us the griffons' perspective of their first encounter with one of these when [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Gilda]]'s squad and the US Marines they were escorting was forced into a "HoldTheLine" situation by the Cloven of The Sun. They're not on the business end of it, but that doesn't make it any less awe-inspiring: Cloven Elder Rams are heavily armored shock troops the size of vehicles, and known for being ''ridiculously'' hard to take out by the griffons; the M2 [[CurbStompBattle shreds them in a matter of seconds]]. Fortrakt, her subordinate and close friend, sums it up:
--> '''Fortrakt:''' I want one of those.
20th Jun '16 9:13:19 PM YoshimitsuMaster
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* ''All over the place'' in [[VideoGame/CallofDuty ''Call of Duty'']] (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.

to:

* ''All over the place'' in [[VideoGame/CallofDuty ''Call of Duty'']] ''VideoGame/CallofDuty'' (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.
20th Jun '16 9:35:31 AM dlchen145
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* Comes up twice in [[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/90939/1/shell-shock/the-tower Shell Shock.]] The first time, they are mentioned in passing. The second time, the gun is used to massacre POW's. [[http://www.fimfiction.net/user/kalash93 Kalash93]] loves his Soviet military hardware.



* The RPD is used extensively in stories by [[http://www.fimfiction.net/user/kalash93 Kalash93.]]
** Appears in [[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/90939/1/shell-shock/the-tower Shell Shock]] in the hands of Equestrian peacekeepers.
** Used in a flashback in ''FanFic/RacerAndTheGeek''.
20th Jun '16 9:28:22 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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[[folder: Browning M1919]]

to:

[[folder: Browning M1919]][=M1919=]]]
20th Jun '16 9:24:02 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm Mauser [[note]]Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[\note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations[[/note]].

to:

The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm Mauser [[note]]Remember [[note]] Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[\note]], [[/note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations[[/note]].



* ''All over the place'' in [[VideoGame/Call of Duty ''Call of Duty'']] (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.

to:

* ''All over the place'' in [[VideoGame/Call of Duty [[VideoGame/CallofDuty ''Call of Duty'']] (the WWII ones at least), since said franchise features the Americans heavily.
20th Jun '16 9:19:34 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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One of the many weapons designed by legendary firearms designer John Moses Browning, the air-cooled recoil-operated M1919 entered service in (duh) 1919, and has seen action in about every war ever since, from World War II to the still-ongoing Syrian Civil War. It is the FN MAG's grandfather, sharing many similarities; used for nearly everything (the M1919 is used for infantry support, aircraft armament, anti-air emplacement, machine gun positions, and tank-mounted MGs)and has a reputation for nigh-indestructibility (i.e the MAG and the M1919 ''always'' work). The fact that both are mainstays for US service for their respective eras (the M1919 until 1990, and the MAG beyond that) doesn't hurt either.

The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm Mauser [[note]]Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[\note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations]].

to:

One of the many weapons designed by legendary firearms designer John Moses Browning, the air-cooled recoil-operated M1919 entered service in (duh) 1919, and has seen action in about every war ever since, from World War II to the still-ongoing Syrian Civil War. It is the FN MAG's grandfather, sharing many similarities; used for nearly everything (the M1919 is used for infantry support, aircraft armament, anti-air emplacement, machine gun positions, and tank-mounted MGs)and coaxial and/or turret guns)and has a reputation for nigh-indestructibility (i.e the MAG and the M1919 ''always'' work). The fact that both are mainstays for US service for their respective eras (the M1919 until 1990, and the MAG beyond that) doesn't hurt either.

The M1919 is used by many countries, and as such has many different chamberings. US M1919s go with .30-06 Springfield, whereas German ones go with 7,92x57mm Mauser [[note]]Remember that Belgium was conquered and they now make weapons for the Germans.[[\note]], captured Soviet ones go with 7,62x54mmR (and as a bonus, a conversion kit for recreational shooters in the US exists for this caliber as the ammo is cheap and abundant), Argentinians used the 7,65x53mm Argentine, BritsWithBattleships go with their .303 British, and French ones use 7,5x54mm French.[[note]] At least, all of these were used during [=WWII=], after the war, most were using 7,62x51mm NATO or 7,62x54mmR to take advantage of their respective sides' generous ammo donations]].
donations[[/note]].
20th Jun '16 9:15:51 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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[[\folder]]

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[[\folder]][[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=CoolGuns.MachineGuns