History CoolGuns / MachineGuns

22nd Feb '17 4:03:28 PM dlchen145
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* Appears in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games set in World War II, since the various games have British-focused missions and the Bren gun is easily recognizable due to its top-loading magazine; it's overall superior to the BAR, at least in campaign, due to the slightly higher mag capacity and the fact that you can actually get more ammunition for it since the devs didn't forget to spawn the ammo in checkpoints or hand the gun out to other friendly {{redshirt}}s. ''World at War'' features its Japanese counterpart, the Type 99 automatic rifle, available often in singleplayer and as the first machine gun unlocked in multiplayer; it's limited by its 30-round magazine and a rather slow reload, but in turn has a fast rate of fire, very little recoil and rather open sights.

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* Appears in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games set in World War II, since the various games have British-focused missions and the Bren gun is easily recognizable due to its top-loading magazine; it's overall superior to the BAR, at least in campaign, due to the slightly higher mag capacity and the fact that you can actually get more ammunition for it since the devs didn't forget to spawn the ammo in checkpoints or hand the gun out to other friendly {{redshirt}}s. ''World at War'' features its Japanese counterpart, the Type 99 automatic rifle, available often in singleplayer and as the first machine gun unlocked in multiplayer; it's limited by its 30-round magazine and a rather slow reload, but in turn has a fast rate of fire, very little recoil and rather open sights.
22nd Feb '17 4:02:45 PM dlchen145
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The Bren also has two Japanese counterparts, both also based on the vz. 26[[note]]Nationalist China locally produced the vz. 26 and used it as their main light machine gun; the Japanese simply captured some of them and reverse-engineered them.[[/note]], the Type 96 chambered in 6.5x50mm Arisaka, and the Type 99 in 7.7x58mm Arisaka. The two weapons were feared in the Pacific Theater, particularly for their accuracy. The Japanese would often lay deadly hails of bullets from concealed positions (in Iwo Jima, several gunners manage to down a Marine fire team or two), or fit a special 2.5x telescopic sight to create, essentially, an ''automatic sniper rifle''. However, the Type 96 had a problematic oil pump, intended to ensure reliable feeding, but which at best was a pointlessly-heavy addition and at worst sucked up dirt and grime like a vacuum, rendering the gun even more prone to jamming than without. The later Type 99 lacks the oil pump and all the problems it carries.
15th Feb '17 6:12:30 PM TheWildWestPyro
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15th Feb '17 6:12:20 PM TheWildWestPyro
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The Vickers went on to be used until the 70ís by Britain and the 90ís by other nations, famously fighting through both World Wars, first as a heavy machine gun and becoming a medium machine gun when the Browning [=M2HB=] entered British service. This was mostly because it never broke: it could jam if the ammo fed into it was dud, and drills existed to get the duds out and the weapon firing again, but the gun itself was almost indestructible. In one 1916 test, ten guns of the 100th machine gun company fired one belt short of one million rounds in twelve hours, and only two guns encountered problems: all ten were serviceable again following basic maintenance. British soldiers did similar, impromptu "tests" just before the Vickers was finally retired, as a more fun way to dispose of the .303 ammo that no other weapon still in service used. Despite the guns having been used for decades, they held up just as well as in those early tests. The Vickers itself was also very light for a water-cooled machine gun, weighing only 15-23kg compared to the 27.2kg Maxim, so the soldiers carrying it had no problem packing it up and carrying it across jungle mountains, No Man's Land or desert hills.

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The Vickers went on to be used until the 70ís by Britain and the 90ís by other nations, famously fighting through both World Wars, first as a heavy machine gun and becoming a medium machine gun when the Browning [=M2HB=] entered British service. This was mostly because it never broke: it could jam if the ammo fed into it was dud, and drills existed to get the duds out and the weapon firing again, but the gun itself was almost indestructible. In one 1916 test, ten guns of the 100th machine gun company fired one belt short of one million rounds in twelve hours, and only two guns encountered problems: all ten were serviceable again following basic maintenance. British soldiers did similar, impromptu "tests" just before the Vickers was finally retired, as a more fun way to dispose of the .303 ammo that no other weapon still in service used. Despite the guns having been used for decades, they held up just as well as in those early tests. The Vickers itself was also very astoundingly light for a compared to other water-cooled machine gun, guns, weighing only 15-23kg compared to the 27.2kg Maxim, so the soldiers carrying it had no problem packing it up and carrying it across jungle mountains, No Man's Land or desert hills.
hills. Its weight might have also been a decisive factor in the British and Commonwealth armies using it as a medium machine gun from WW2 into the South African border wars.
15th Feb '17 6:09:41 PM TheWildWestPyro
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* Featured in two ''Literature/{{Sandokan}}'' novels: in ''Sandokan Fights Back'' he brings one when he goes to take back his father's realm, and in ''Yanez's Revenge'' he comes to rescue Yanez with ''twelve''. Given his enemies were hordes of spear and knife-armed Dayaks in the first case and a badly-motivated force with few many knives and a few antiquated muskets, his enemies couldn't afford to face him in open battle.

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* Featured in two ''Literature/{{Sandokan}}'' novels: in ''Sandokan Fights Back'' he brings one when he goes to take back his father's realm, and in ''Yanez's Revenge'' he comes to rescue Yanez with ''twelve''. ''[[MoreDakka twelve]]''. Given his enemies were hordes of spear and knife-armed Dayaks in the first case and a badly-motivated force with few many knives and a few antiquated muskets, muskets in the second, his enemies couldn't afford to face him in open battle.
13th Feb '17 6:55:48 PM Bossman
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/TheDivision'', the M60 and the E3 and E4 variants are available as light machine guns. Strangely, it can take a magazine mod even though there's no magazine on the model, just a dangling ammo belt that [[BottomlessMagazines isn't long enough to match the gun's 100 bullet capacity]]. It's also got a really slow reload, as your character has to open the cover, pull out the old belt (even if the gun was empty!), load it a new belt of the ''same length'' and close it back up.
13th Feb '17 9:43:22 AM dlchen145
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The original M249 was eventually developed into the Mk 46 variant, which included accessory rails and removed several features deemed unnecessary to cut lessen its weight. The Mk 46 in turn has been developed into a slightly larger 7.62x51 version, the Mk 48, to finally replace the [=M60=]. The Mk 48 is actually lighter with a 100-round belt than an M60 is with no ammo at all, and it's a more reliable gun to boot. Like its big brother, the FN MAG, the Minimi family was designed by Ernest Vervier.

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The original M249 was eventually developed into the Mk 46 variant, which included includes accessory rails and removed several features deemed unnecessary to cut lessen its weight. The Mk 46 in turn has been developed into a slightly larger 7.62x51 version, the Mk 48, to finally replace the [=M60=]. The Mk 48 is actually lighter with a 100-round belt than an M60 is with no ammo at all, and it's a more reliable gun to boot. Like its big brother, the FN MAG, the Minimi family was designed by Ernest Vervier.



The MAG (Mitrailleuse d'Appui Général; French for [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin General-Purpose Machine Gun]]) general purpose machine gun has seen usage in too many countries to list here. Generally regarded as ''the'' general purpose machine gun, it can be used for infantry support (though it's very heavy for this role, being 3 pounds heavier than the already hefty M60) or mounted on tanks, [=APCs=] and ships. One unusual aspect of its design is that the safety can only be engaged when the weapon is cocked. Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning. Despite its incredibly widespread use, in fiction you'll usually only see it on top of a tank. While its smaller cousin the [=M249=] is known to be a rather temperamental weapon, the [=M240=] ''always'' works.

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The MAG (Mitrailleuse d'Appui Général; French for [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin General-Purpose Machine Gun]]) general purpose machine gun has seen usage in too many countries to list here. Generally regarded as ''the'' general purpose machine gun, it can be used for infantry support (though it's very heavy for this role, being 3 pounds heavier than the already hefty M60) or mounted on tanks, [=APCs=] and ships. One unusual aspect of its design is that the safety can only be engaged when the weapon is cocked. Hollywood tends to gloss over this one in favour of the M60 or M249 mainly due to the fact that the US primarily uses the MAG ([[AKA47 as the M240]]) in the vehicle-mounted role, where the even larger M2 or M134 serve better as a scene-stealing {{BFG}}. As noted above, it's partially derived from the BAR with a trigger and feed mechanism based on the [=MG42=]. The MAG's designer Ernest Vervier was the protege of [[CoolGuns/BattleRifles FAL]] and [[CoolGuns/{{Handguns}} Hi-Power]] designer Dieudonné Saive, who in turn was a protege of John Moses Browning. Despite its incredibly widespread use, in fiction you'll usually only see it on top of a tank. While its smaller cousin the [=M249=] is known to be a rather somewhat temperamental weapon, the [=M240=] ''always'' works.
12th Feb '17 10:07:53 PM TheWildWestPyro
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[[quoteright:298:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mg42lmg_4905.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:298:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mg42lmg_4905.jpg]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_27.jpeg]]
11th Feb '17 6:51:51 PM TheWildWestPyro
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Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock (also necessitating a redesigned stock, and in turn the use of a pistol grip). The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Thousands of DPs were supplied to the Republicans during the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar as part of Soviet aid. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.

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Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock (also necessitating a redesigned stock, and in turn the use of a pistol grip). The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Thousands of DPs [=DP=]s were supplied to the Republicans during the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar as part of Soviet aid. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.
11th Feb '17 6:51:33 PM TheWildWestPyro
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Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock (also necessitating a redesigned stock, and in turn the use of a pistol grip). The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.

to:

Most of these issues were ironed out in the upgrade to the DPM around 1943, which utilized a more robust bipod and moved the recoil spring into a tube projecting from the rear of the weapon above the stock (also necessitating a redesigned stock, and in turn the use of a pistol grip). The Soviets built it in plenty of versions and issued it to infantry troops as well as fitting it to tanks, aircraft, even the sidecars of motorcycles. Thousands of DPs were supplied to the Republicans during the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar as part of Soviet aid. Many were captured by Finland during World War II (nearly 10,000 captured, compared to the 3,400 M26 machine guns they built themselves), enough that they simply stopped making the M26 and used the DP as their primary machine gun for the duration of the war and beyond. There are still some of them in service that were fired as recently as the 2011 Libyan Civil War and the 2001-present Afghanistan War. After WWII, the Soviets issued a conversion kit to enable the Degtyarev to be converted to a belt-feed; the resulting '''RP-46''' is a relatively rare sight and not particularly well-known. Nevertheless, it served as the standard light machine gun of the Red Army until replaced by the RPD starting from 1953.
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