History CoolGuns / Handguns

19th Aug '17 7:06:42 AM TheWildWestPyro
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The C96 was vastly popular in the first half of the 20th century, seeing some its earliest use in the Boer War. When he was captured by the Boers, UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill armed himself with one when he escaped. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, the C96 supplemented the Luger as the main sidearm of Imperial Germany, and was popular with Ottoman officers too. After the defeat of Germany, Mauser introduced the M1921 model that featured a shortened barrel. When the Russian Civil War broke out, large numbers were sold to both the White and Red armies-the M1921's association with the latter gave it its famous "Bolo" nickname. During the Spanish Civil War, Spanish company Astra made semi-auto and full-auto copies as the Astra 900 for both sides. However, Nationalist China was the only nation to officially adopt the C96 as a service pistol from 1911 to the 1950s, with the Chinese Communists and warlords using the pistol in vast numbers. Due to this, Chinese copies are extremely common, some dating to the 20s and 30s and some being rather more recent (using 20s machinery that had somehow avoided being melted down during the "Great Leap Forward") for export sale. One famous Chinese version was an [[http://www.pointshooting.com/c96ok.pdf enlarged .45 ACP model by the Shanxi Arsenal,]] for warlord Yan Xishan (who wanted his "security forces" to have a C96 chambered in the same round as their Thompson submachine guns). The Shanxi Type-17 is now considered to be one of the finest copies of the C96, despite its problems (see below). Modified copies were also made in Spain, such as the Astra 900 series, which included both semi-auto and full-auto versions. These are now considerably less common than the German and Chinese Broomhandles.

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The C96 was vastly popular in the first half of the 20th century, seeing some its earliest use in the Boer War. When he was captured by the Boers, UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill armed himself with one when he escaped. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, the C96 supplemented the Luger as the main sidearm of Imperial Germany, and was popular with Ottoman officers too. After the defeat of Germany, Mauser introduced the M1921 model that featured a shortened barrel. When the Russian Civil War broke out, large numbers were sold to both the White and Red armies-the M1921's association with the latter gave it its famous "Bolo" nickname. During the Spanish Civil War, Spanish company Astra made semi-auto and full-auto copies as the Astra 900 for both sides.

However, Nationalist China was the only nation to officially adopt the C96 as a service pistol from 1911 to the 1950s, with the Chinese Communists and warlords using the pistol in vast numbers. Due to this, Chinese copies are extremely common, some dating to the 20s and 30s and some being rather more recent (using 20s machinery that had somehow avoided being melted down during the "Great Leap Forward") for export sale. One famous Chinese version was an [[http://www.pointshooting.com/c96ok.pdf enlarged .45 ACP model by the Shanxi Arsenal,]] for warlord Yan Xishan (who wanted his "security forces" to have a C96 chambered in the same round as their Thompson submachine guns). The Shanxi Type-17 is now considered to be one of the finest copies of the C96, despite its problems (see below). Modified copies were also made in Spain, such as the Astra 900 series, which included both semi-auto and full-auto versions. These are now considerably less common than the German and Chinese Broomhandles.



** The Chinese had devised a cool action of their own with their copied C96s: while the original C96 was notorious for their constant recoil-induced jumps during automatic fire (thus the resulting lack of accuracy and impracticality), the .45-caliber Type-17 was even more problematic as .45 ACP, despite being significantly more powerful, develops less operating pressure in the chamber than 9mm or 7.63mm Mauser. Since the ejection port is located on top of the weapon, Shanxi Type-17 pistols therefore couldn't reliably eject spent cases because .45 ACP wouldn't cycle the bolt hard enough to overcome ''gravity''. Chinese users adapted by holding the gun sideways, allowing spent brass to fall out, while recoil naturally pushed the barrel sideways towards the next target. "Chinese bandit shooting" was utterly devastating in close quarters and worked with C96s in any caliber, but especially with a full-auto [=M712=] ''Schnellfeuer'' conversion or its Spanish copy. However, it was still useless beyond 10 yard, but handy for a country where industrial resources and foundation were severely lacking at the beginning of the 20th Century, to say the least. As very few in China at the time could afford, let alone copy and manufacture submachine guns, a full-auto C96 became many a warlord soldier's sole option for a rapid-firing small arm.

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** The Chinese had devised a cool action of their own with their copied C96s: while the original C96 was notorious for their constant recoil-induced jumps during automatic fire (thus the resulting lack of accuracy and impracticality), the .45-caliber Type-17 was even more problematic as .45 ACP, despite being significantly more powerful, develops less operating pressure in the chamber than 9mm or 7.63mm Mauser. Since the ejection port is located on top of the weapon, Shanxi Type-17 pistols therefore couldn't reliably eject spent cases because .45 ACP wouldn't cycle the bolt hard enough to overcome ''gravity''. Chinese users adapted by holding the gun sideways, allowing spent brass to fall out, while recoil naturally pushed the barrel sideways towards the next target. "Chinese bandit shooting" was utterly devastating in close quarters and worked with C96s in any caliber, but especially with a full-auto [=M712=] ''Schnellfeuer'' conversion or its Spanish copy. However, it was still useless beyond 10 yard, yards, but handy for a country where industrial resources and foundation were severely lacking at the beginning of the 20th Century, to say the least. As very few in China at the time could afford, let alone copy and manufacture submachine guns, a full-auto C96 became many a warlord soldier's sole option for a rapid-firing small arm.arm, [[SwordAndGun sometimes combined with a Dadao sword]].
18th Aug '17 11:35:08 AM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 27 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm Auto. Differences in caliber and frame size notwithstanding (and with the exceptions of the select-fire Glock 18 and the blowback-operated .380 ACP Glocks 25 and 28), each model of Glock works essentially the same as any other, has the same basic components, and several models allow for readily changing calibers with a replacement barrel (e.g., the .40 S&W and .357 SIG models can take replacement barrels in either caliber, and both can take a replacement 9mm barrel). In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.

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Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 27 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm Auto. Differences in caliber and frame size notwithstanding (and with the exceptions of the select-fire Glock 18 and the blowback-operated .380 ACP Glocks 25 and 28), each model of Glock works essentially the same as any other, has the same basic components, and several models allow for readily changing calibers with a replacement barrel (e.g., the .40 S&W and .357 SIG models can take replacement barrels in either caliber, and both can take a replacement 9mm barrel). In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.



Like the Glock, the M&P semiautomatic pistol is made from polymer, and is striker-fired, with no manual safety (an optional manual safety was later released as an accessory in 2009). The weapon was designed with ergonomics and customizability in mind, with an accessory rail, ambidextrous slide stop, and reversible grip-mounted magazine release.

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This isn't S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock; their earlier Sigma series attempted to directly compete as well, but suffered from design issues like an extremely long trigger pull and was a little ''too'' similar to its rival; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit from Glock led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties.

Like the Glock, the M&P semiautomatic pistol is made from polymer, and is striker-fired, with no manual safety (an optional manual safety was later released as an accessory in 2009). The weapon was designed with ergonomics and customizability in mind, with an accessory rail, ambidextrous slide stop, and reversible grip-mounted magazine release. One notable improvement the M&P has over the Glock is that disassembly does not require a pull of the trigger - something that has been the cause of quite a few negligent discharges with Glocks.
17th Aug '17 7:17:34 PM Wuz
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* The starting pistol for the Terrorist team in ''Counter-Strike'', in which it can fire in both semi-auto and burst-fire modes.

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* The starting pistol for the Terrorist team in ''Counter-Strike'', ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', in which it can fire in both semi-auto and burst-fire modes.



* Available for use in ''Counter-Strike'', in which it is the middling pistol between the lighter USP and the heavier Desert Eagle; ''Global Offensive'' replaces it with a compact P250.

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* Available for use in ''Counter-Strike'', ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', in which it is the middling pistol between the lighter USP and the heavier Desert Eagle; ''Global Offensive'' replaces it with a compact P250.
16th Aug '17 9:38:47 PM JackTheHammer
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In May 2017, Springfield released the XD-E, a subcompact, single-stack model with an external hammer that allows for double/single-action firing.

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In May 2017, Springfield released the XD-E, a subcompact, single-stack model with an external hammer that allows for double/single-action firing.
firing. XD purists lament [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks the removal of the grip safety on this model.]]
16th Aug '17 9:36:32 PM JackTheHammer
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The M&P comes in multiple versions, varying in size and capacity. Available chamberings include 9x19mm Para, .40 S&W, .357 SIG, and .45 ACP.

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The M&P comes in multiple versions, varying in size and capacity. Available chamberings include 9x19mm Para, .40 S&W, .357 SIG, and .45 ACP.
ACP. The sub-compact M&P variant meant for concealed carry is known as the Shield.



If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's made in Croatia under the official designation [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at certain US gun buyers who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American".[[labelnote:Note]]The actual American-made equivalent to the Glock would be the Smith & Wesson M&P polymer series.[[/labelnote]] This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seen some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19mm, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well. An updated version, the XD-m, has also achieved popularity, boasting several ergonomic improvements and a [[MoreDakka 19 round magazine.]]

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If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's made in Croatia under the official designation [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at certain US gun buyers who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American".[[labelnote:Note]]The actual American-made equivalent to the Glock would be the Smith & Wesson M&P polymer series.series; see above.[[/labelnote]] This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seen some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19mm, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well. An updated version, the XD-m, XD(M), has also achieved popularity, boasting several ergonomic improvements and a [[MoreDakka 19 round magazine.]]]]

In May 2017, Springfield released the XD-E, a subcompact, single-stack model with an external hammer that allows for double/single-action firing.
16th Aug '17 12:31:13 AM TheWildWestPyro
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* Indy uses it himself during the tank chase in ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade'', where it somehow manages to be a HandCannon and ''shoot through three Nazis at once.''

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* Indy uses it himself during the tank chase in ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade'', where it somehow manages to be a HandCannon and ''shoot through three Nazis at once.''once'', causing Indy to stare at his P38 in shock.
15th Aug '17 1:23:28 AM TheWildWestPyro
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* The standard sidearms for the Japanese in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', where its primary users are the officers and [[CombatMedic medics]].

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* The standard sidearms sidearm for the Japanese in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', where its primary users are the officers and [[CombatMedic medics]].
15th Aug '17 1:23:19 AM TheWildWestPyro
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* The standard sidearms for the Japanese in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', where it's primary users are the officers and [[CombatMedic medics]].

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* The standard sidearms for the Japanese in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', where it's its primary users are the officers and [[CombatMedic medics]].
14th Aug '17 11:32:40 PM Rmpdc
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Added DiffLines:

* The standard sidearms for the Japanese in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', where it's primary users are the officers and [[CombatMedic medics]].
11th Aug '17 10:26:47 AM CynicalBastardo
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* The M&P makes its first video game appearance in ''VideoGame/AlphaProtocol''.

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* The M&P makes its first video game appearance in ''VideoGame/AlphaProtocol''.''VideoGame/AlphaProtocol'' as the [[AKA47 Hamilton 45]]. It's the [[JackOfAllStats most balanced of the game's pistols]].
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