History CoolGuns / Handguns

19th Jan '17 9:34:36 PM tommythegun
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Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 27 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm. Differences in caliber and frame size notwithstanding (and with the exceptions of the three models not sold to the general public: the select-fire Glock 18 and the .380 ACP Glocks 25 and 28), each model of Glock works essentially the same as any other, has the same basic components, and several models allow for readily changing calibers with a replacement barrel (e.g., the .40 S&W and .357 SIG models can take replacement barrels in either caliber, and both can take a replacement 9mm barrel). In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.

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Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 27 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm. Differences in caliber and frame size notwithstanding (and with the exceptions of the three models not sold to the general public: the select-fire Glock 18 and the .the blowback-operated .380 ACP Glocks 25 and 28), each model of Glock works essentially the same as any other, has the same basic components, and several models allow for readily changing calibers with a replacement barrel (e.g., the .40 S&W and .357 SIG models can take replacement barrels in either caliber, and both can take a replacement 9mm barrel). In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.
19th Jan '17 9:28:56 PM tommythegun
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A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, and subcompact versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple operation, minimal amount of moving parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket accessories all make it ''very'' appealing. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.

Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 25 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm. In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.

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A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, subcompact, slimline, competition and subcompact longslide versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple operation, minimal amount of moving parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket accessories all make it ''very'' appealing. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.

Contrary to [[UrbanLegend scaremongering]], the gun is not "plastic" in any sense; a Glock is 80% metal by weight and [[DontTryThisAtHome shows up quite nicely on an airport metal detector]]. The selective-fire Glock 18 machine pistol variant is capable of firing at 1,100-1,200 RPM in fullauto mode. In total, there are 25 27 basic Glock models (defined by a combination of caliber and frame size, plus the Glock 18 which is identical in caliber and size to the Glock 17 but gets a different model number for being select-fire) and four "generations" (defined by various refinements to the design); generations 1-3 versions of every model have been produced, while generation 4 is being phased in from 2010 onward, naturally starting with the most popular models (the Glock 17 and 22). The model number 40 had previously been skipped, apparently to avoid buyer confusion since (especially in the United States) "Glock 40" is used to generically refer to any of the five .40 S&W models. And then in 2015, the Glock 40 [[{{Defictionalization}} was officially brought into existence]] as a longslide variant chambered in 10mm. Differences in caliber and frame size notwithstanding (and with the exceptions of the three models not sold to the general public: the select-fire Glock 18 and the .380 ACP Glocks 25 and 28), each model of Glock works essentially the same as any other, has the same basic components, and several models allow for readily changing calibers with a replacement barrel (e.g., the .40 S&W and .357 SIG models can take replacement barrels in either caliber, and both can take a replacement 9mm barrel). In recent years, a slew of imitators have arrived on the market offering similar black polymer striker-fired pistols; the Springfield XD and Smith and Wesson M&P[[note]]S&W's first attempt to compete with the Glock, the Sigma, was a little ''too'' similar; many parts were actually interchangeable with the Glock 17. The inevitable lawsuit led to changes in the design and a large settlement paid to Glock. The M&P soon replaced the Sigma since S&W wasn't interested in paying continued royalties to Glock.[[/note]] are among the most popular.
19th Jan '17 9:07:20 PM tommythegun
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A 9mm pistol originally designed by John Browning for Belgian arms company Fabrique Nationale, and finished after his death by FN designer Dieudonne Saive, this pistol was first released in 1935, and due to Saive's invention of the double-stack magazine, carried an unprecedented 13 rounds of ammunition in the magazine. Colloquially known as the BHP, P-35, BAP (Browning Automatic Pistol), and the "King of Nines", this single action design can be seen as a successor to the 1911, to which it is very similar in design. Used by both sides in WWII, most NATO nations during [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar the Cold War]], and still widely used today, and is one of the most common firearms outside of the United States (where the 1911 is still king). While some may dislike the lesser stopping power of the 9mm compared to a .45, the Hi-Power certainly inherited the 1911's indestructibility--it ''always'' works. Due to a magazine disconnect attached to the trigger bar,[[note]]The disconnect is a relic of the original French military requirement that the Hi-Power was created for, though the French ended up adopting an inferior locally-designed pistol instead. As the design was further refined after the French rejection, the disconnect was retained because the Belgian military wanted to make sure magazines didn't drop free on their own when released, and conveniently enough the existing magazine disconnect design already did this. While modern shooters consider it a very good thing for magazines to cleanly drop free when released, so as to enable faster reloading, the Belgian generals at the time were more worried about their troops simply throwing away empty magazines and thus requiring a constant purchase of replacement mags.[[/note]] the trigger pull is often very tough for a single action pistol; many users often say "screw the warranty" and remove it. Most Hi-Powers built during the Nazi occupation of Belgium lack the magazine disconnect (a cost-cutting measure rather than an an attempt to improve the trigger pull), while the ones made in Canada by Inglis for the Allies retained it. Decades later FN designed a new magazine disconnect for use in a specialized competition version of the Hi-Power that didn't adversely affect trigger pull...but it was deemed too expensive for inclusion in the standard models. Like the 1911, it's old enough that clones can legally be made without the permission of FN/Browning, and many are. Some are exact copies, while others try to "improve" the original Browning/Saive design with varying degrees of success.

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A 9mm pistol originally designed by John Browning for Belgian arms company Fabrique Nationale, and finished after his death by FN designer Dieudonne Saive, this pistol was first released in 1935, and due to Saive's invention of the double-stack magazine, carried an unprecedented 13 rounds of ammunition in the magazine. Colloquially known as the BHP, P-35, BAP (Browning Automatic Pistol), and the "King of Nines", this single action design can be seen as a successor to the 1911, to which it is very similar in design. The bar cam short recoil action pioneered in the Hi-Power was designed to get around the patent on the toggle-link design of the 1911 (which Browning had sold to Colt), and has since become more common than the original 1911 design. Used by both sides in WWII, most NATO nations during [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar the Cold War]], and still widely used today, and is one of the most common firearms outside of the United States (where the 1911 is still king). While some may dislike the lesser stopping power of the 9mm compared to a .45, the Hi-Power certainly inherited the 1911's indestructibility--it ''always'' works. Due to a magazine disconnect attached to the trigger bar,[[note]]The disconnect is a relic of the original French military requirement that the Hi-Power was created for, though the French ended up adopting an inferior locally-designed pistol instead. As the design was further refined after the French rejection, the disconnect was retained because the Belgian military wanted to make sure magazines didn't drop free on their own when released, and conveniently enough the existing magazine disconnect design already did this. While modern shooters consider it a very good thing for magazines to cleanly drop free when released, so as to enable faster reloading, the Belgian generals at the time were more worried about their troops simply throwing away empty magazines and thus requiring a constant purchase of replacement mags.[[/note]] the trigger pull is often very tough for a single action pistol; many users often say "screw the warranty" and remove it. Most Hi-Powers built during the Nazi occupation of Belgium lack the magazine disconnect (a cost-cutting measure rather than an an attempt to improve the trigger pull), while the ones made in Canada by Inglis for the Allies retained it. Decades later FN designed a new magazine disconnect for use in a specialized competition version of the Hi-Power that didn't adversely affect trigger pull...but it was deemed too expensive for inclusion in the standard models. Like the 1911, it's old enough that clones can legally be made without the permission of FN/Browning, and many are. Some are exact copies, while others try to "improve" the original Browning/Saive design with varying degrees of success.
16th Jan '17 9:30:40 PM Cinereous
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* [[MafiaPrincess Fio Vanetti]] has one in ''Anime/NinetyOneDays.''
16th Jan '17 3:48:31 PM Cinereous
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If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's actually made in Croatia under the official designation, [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at certain US gun buyers who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American". This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seen some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well.

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If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's actually made in Croatia under the official designation, [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at certain US gun buyers who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American". [[labelnote:Note]]The actual American-made equivalent to the Glock would be the Smith & Wesson M&P polymer series[[/labelnote]] This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seen some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well.
16th Jan '17 1:41:11 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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# Jamming at the slightest provocation.
The gun is generally looked upon poorly by military users and firearm enthusiasts due to being heavier and having a noticeably fatter grip than a 1911, generally poor performance in dirty conditions, and a perceived lack of stopping power, especially by critics used to the more powerful .45 ACP load from the M1911. It has also had persistent issues with faulty magazines (not made by Beretta for cost reasons) and a situation where the slide pops off the weapon during action (at least one Navy SEAL [[EyeScream lost an eye to a flying Beretta hammer]], though reports of anyone dying from it are an exaggeration). Though these issues have been dealt with, it is nevertheless a high-maintenance gun that doesn't get along well with dust (remember the open-topped slide?) and is notorious for wearing out very quickly. It's generally considered the best example of why ceremonial pistols[[note]]Most European armies have historically regarded pistols as a status symbol for officers that would (maybe) only be fired to execute a deserter. Such pistols were generally small weapons chambered in something like .25 or .32, and generally didn't like dirt, but they looked cool. The US and British armies had the experience of the Frontier Indian Wars and the various colonial conflicts of the British Empire, in which pistols were frequently used in combat for offensive and defensive purposes. As a result, YanksWithTanks and BritsWithBattleships usually packed big automatics or revolvers that launched bullets in calibers starting at .45, and were subjected to torture tests before adoption and issue.[[/note]] shouldn't be used as practical combat handguns. The opinion of those who carry it ranges from "It's okay but not great," to ''"FUCK THIS USELESS PIECE OF SHIT!!!"'' As of 2015, the M9 is due to be replaced through the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_Handgun_System Modular Handgun System.]] Assuming [[HereWeGoAgain it doesn't get canned halfway through again]], this will spell the end of the M9's service life in the US armed forces, as Beretta has chosen to compete with the newer striker-fired APX rather than the [=M9A3=].

Civilian and police usage has also fell dramatically compared to the gun's heyday of the 1980's and 90's. Simply put, there's more cheaper, more reliable, and more effective handguns available now than back then. Hollywood still uses these extensively to this day as there's still plenty of perfectly good Berettas sitting around in the inventory of many a film armorer.

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# Jamming at It's infamy for an issue where the slightest provocation.
slide could break off while in action, which the Navy SEALs found out the hard way.
The gun is generally looked upon poorly by military users and firearm enthusiasts due to being heavier and having a noticeably fatter grip than a 1911, generally poor performance in dirty conditions, and a perceived lack of stopping power, especially by critics used to the more powerful .45 ACP load from the M1911. It has also had has persistent issues with faulty magazines (not made by Beretta for cost reasons) and a situation where the slide pops off the weapon during action (at least one Navy SEAL [[EyeScream lost an eye to a flying Beretta hammer]], though reports of anyone dying from it are an exaggeration). Though these issues have exaggeration), though that has been (mostly) dealt with, it with. It is nevertheless a high-maintenance gun that doesn't get along well with dust (remember the open-topped slide?) and is notorious for wearing out very quickly. It's generally considered the best example of why ceremonial pistols[[note]]Most European armies have historically regarded pistols as a status symbol for officers that would (maybe) only be fired to execute a deserter. Such pistols were generally small weapons chambered in something like .25 or .32, and generally didn't like dirt, but they looked cool. The US and British armies had the experience of the Frontier Indian Wars and the various colonial conflicts of the British Empire, in which pistols were frequently used in combat for offensive and defensive purposes. As a result, YanksWithTanks and BritsWithBattleships usually packed big automatics or revolvers that launched bullets in calibers starting at .45, and were subjected to torture tests before adoption and issue.[[/note]] shouldn't be used as practical combat handguns. The opinion of those who carry it ranges from "It's okay but not great," to ''"FUCK THIS USELESS PIECE OF SHIT!!!"'' As of 2015, the M9 is due to be replaced through the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_Handgun_System Modular Handgun System.]] Assuming [[HereWeGoAgain it doesn't get canned halfway through again]], this will spell the end of the M9's service life in the US armed forces, as Beretta has chosen to compete with the newer striker-fired APX rather than the [=M9A3=].

Civilian and police usage has also fell dramatically compared to the gun's heyday of the 1980's and 90's. Simply put, there's more cheaper, more reliable, and more effective handguns available now than back then. now, and Beretta has not been able to effectively address the design's flaws since its inception. Hollywood films still uses these extensively to this day day, as there's still plenty of perfectly good Berettas sitting around in the inventory of many a film armorer.



A major reason for the M1911's popularity in the US was because the modern pistol technique, originally taught by Colonel Jeff Cooper, favored the M1911 - Cooper was one of the gun's most devout followers, and many chose to follow his example. The "condition codes" that have been frequently adapted for a handgun's state of being loaded and ready was originally created in reference to the M1911 as well. The Assault Weapons Ban of 1993 also saw a resurgence in the weapon's popularity - the logic was that if you were limited to 10-round magazines, you might as well get something that's going to make each shot count. While US police and military uses have sharply declined since the 1980's, it remains a ''very'' popular handgun for civilians and maintains a staunchly dedicated following to this day.

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A major reason for the M1911's popularity in the US was because the modern pistol technique, originally taught by Colonel Jeff Cooper, favored the M1911 - Cooper was one of the gun's most devout followers, users, and many chose to follow his example. The "condition codes" that have been frequently adapted for a handgun's state of being loaded and ready was originally created in reference to the M1911 as well. The Assault Weapons Ban of 1993 also saw a resurgence in the weapon's popularity - the logic was that if you were limited to 10-round magazines, you might as well get something that's going to make each shot count. While US police and military uses have sharply declined since the 1980's, it remains a ''very'' popular handgun for civilians and maintains a staunchly dedicated following to this day.



A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, and subcompact versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple operation, low amount of parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket parts all make it ''very'' appealing. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.

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A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, and subcompact versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple operation, low minimal amount of moving parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket parts accessories all make it ''very'' appealing. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.
16th Jan '17 12:34:43 AM TheWildWestPyro
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Added DiffLines:

* The Luger is the favored weapon of Captain Vidal in ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', who uses it to brutally slaughter numerous characters of the course of the film.
15th Jan '17 1:58:10 PM Jake18
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* The basic pistol in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV''.

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* The PT92 shows up as the basic pistol in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV''.
11th Jan '17 9:57:06 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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The USP is a German handgun, adopted by the German army as the P8, the German police as the P10 (Compact version), and various special forces groups as the P12 (Tactical version). Originally designed for the .40 S&W cartridge, shortly followed by 9x19mm and .45 ACP variants (each is superficially identical, save for the [=USP45=] being visibly larger than the other versions). The USP is, in some form, both a derivative of and the predecessor to the even larger [[RareGuns Mark 23]],[[note]]Prototypes for the USP were used as the basis for the Mark 23, which were then slimmed down a tad and rechambered for .40 S&W to create the final USP.[[/note]] the SOCOM variant of which was adopted by the US special forces in the '90s. It was eventually superseded by the lighter, smaller and more user friendly USP Tactical (which was adopted by the Bundeswehr's Kommando Spezialkräfte and the German Navy's Kampfschwimmer as the P12), though it is in service with several militaries and police forces around the world. The pistol is legendary for its reliability; during its development, Heckler and Koch subjected it to rigorous tests, all of which it passed with flying colors. It was frozen to -42 Celsius (-43 Fahrenheit), then fired. It was then heated to 67 Celsius (152 Fahrenheit) and fired again. One notable test had a bullet be deliberately lodged in the barrel, and then another bullet fired to clear the obstruction. The barrel only bulged slightly (most guns would explode in response), and a subsequent shot grouping test showed little degradation in accuracy. It's also legendary for its price tag.

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The USP is a German handgun, adopted by the German army as the P8, the German police as the P10 (Compact version), and various special forces groups as the P12 (Tactical version). Originally designed for the .40 S&W cartridge, shortly followed by 9x19mm and .45 ACP variants (each is superficially identical, save for the [=USP45=] being visibly larger than the other versions). The USP is, in some form, both a derivative of and the predecessor to the even larger [[RareGuns Mark 23]],[[note]]Prototypes for the USP were used as the basis for the Mark 23, which were then slimmed down a tad and rechambered for .40 S&W to create the final USP.[[/note]] the SOCOM variant of which was adopted by the US special forces in the '90s. It was eventually superseded by the lighter, smaller and more user friendly USP Tactical (which was adopted by the Bundeswehr's Kommando Spezialkräfte and the German Navy's Kampfschwimmer as the P12), though it is in service with several militaries and police forces around the world. The pistol is legendary for its reliability; during its development, Heckler and Koch subjected it to rigorous tests, all of which it passed with flying colors. It was frozen to -42 Celsius (-43 Fahrenheit), then fired. It was then heated to 67 Celsius (152 Fahrenheit) and fired again. One notable test had a bullet be deliberately lodged in the barrel, and then another bullet fired to clear the obstruction. The barrel only bulged slightly (most guns would explode in response), and a subsequent shot grouping test showed little degradation in accuracy. It's also legendary for its price tag.
tag; a new Glock with accessories can be had for the price of just the USP itself, and is a major reason it never caught on with the civilian market. Recently, the USP has begun to be phased out in favor of the newer [=HK45=] and P30.



As a side note, Early Hollywood productions up until the late 1980's tended to use the Star Model B, a Spanish 9mm clone, as a stand-in for the M1911 due to a lack of reliable .45 ACP blanks. Most modern films use genuine M1911's or its many variants as this is no longer an issue.

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As a side note, Early Hollywood productions up until the late 1980's tended to use the Star Model B, a Spanish 9mm clone, as a stand-in for the M1911 due to a lack of reliable .45 ACP blanks. Most modern films use genuine M1911's or its many variants as this is no longer an issue.
blanks.



A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, and subcompact versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple manual of arms, low amount of moving parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket parts. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.

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A semi-automatic polymer handgun designed by Gaston Glock (who had no prior experience whatsoever with firearms), known as the "plastic" or "Tupperware" gun. Though the concept of a polymer framed handgun dated back to 1970 with Heckler & Koch's rather futuristic [=VP70=] machine pistol, the Glock series were the first to truly popularize the idea. The first Glock arrived on the scene in 1982 as a full size 9mm service pistol, and shocked the world when it beat out well-established gunmaker Steyr's GB pistol for the Austrian Army contract. It has since gotten variants for almost all "service pistol" automatic calibers, in full-size, compact, and subcompact versions. The Glock has become a standard service sidearm for many government agencies (the FBI, DEA, many police departments around the world, as well as many security forces and militaries around the world, starting with the Austrian Army that it was originally developed for) due to being the BoringButPractical of handguns; its ruggedness, competitive price, simple manual of arms, operation, low amount of moving parts, built-in safety features, and the vast selection of variants and aftermarket parts.parts all make it ''very'' appealing. Though a [[{{Hatedom}} subset of shooters]] enjoy recounting tales of Glocks exploding or otherwise malfunctioning.[[note]]The "Glock kaboom" is more of an issue with .40-caliber models like the Glock 22, because .40 S&W develops a very high operating pressure in the chamber. Users of 9mm and .45 ACP models rarely encounter this problem. While Glock [=GmbH=] doesn't like admitting that this happens, they clearly state on the box that hotter .40-cal loads (i. e. [[EpicFail the most popular and widely-issued ones]]) might not mix well with this weapon. This has recently led many law enforcement agencies to either switch to a 9mm or .45, or simply dump Glock altogether.[[/note]] Aggressive marketing by Glock [=GmbH=] didn't hurt either; most police departments simply traded in their revolvers or older automatics for Glocks on a one-for-one basis. In 2016, the U.S. Navy stunned the gun world when it announced that the UsefulNotes/NavySeals would be adopting the Glock 19 as their duty sidearm and start transitioning away from the SIG P226 Mark 25.
10th Jan '17 5:42:53 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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The USP is a German handgun, adopted by the German army as the P8, the German police as the P10 (Compact version), and various special forces groups as the P12 (Tactical version). Originally designed for the .40 S&W cartridge, shortly followed by 9x19mm and .45 ACP variants (each is superficially identical, save for the [=USP45=] being visibly larger than the other versions). The USP is, in some form, both a derivative of and the predecessor to the even larger [[RareGuns Mark 23]],[[note]]Prototypes for the USP were used as the basis for the Mark 23, which were then slimmed down a tad and rechambered for .40 S&W to create the final USP.[[/note]] the SOCOM variant of which was adopted by the US special forces in the '90s. It was eventually superseded by the lighter, smaller and more user friendly USP Tactical (which was adopted by the Bundeswehr's Kommando Spezialkräfte and the German Navy's Kampfschwimmer as the P12), though it is in service with several militaries and police forces around the world. The pistol is legendary for its reliability; during its development, Heckler and Koch subjected it to rigorous tests, all of which it passed with flying colors. It was frozen to -42 Celsius (-43 Fahrenheit), then fired. It was then heated to 67 Celsius (152 Fahrenheit) and fired again. One notable test had a bullet be deliberately lodged in the barrel, and then another bullet fired to clear the obstruction. The barrel only bulged slightly (most guns would explode in response), and a subsequent shot grouping test showed little degradation in accuracy.

to:

The USP is a German handgun, adopted by the German army as the P8, the German police as the P10 (Compact version), and various special forces groups as the P12 (Tactical version). Originally designed for the .40 S&W cartridge, shortly followed by 9x19mm and .45 ACP variants (each is superficially identical, save for the [=USP45=] being visibly larger than the other versions). The USP is, in some form, both a derivative of and the predecessor to the even larger [[RareGuns Mark 23]],[[note]]Prototypes for the USP were used as the basis for the Mark 23, which were then slimmed down a tad and rechambered for .40 S&W to create the final USP.[[/note]] the SOCOM variant of which was adopted by the US special forces in the '90s. It was eventually superseded by the lighter, smaller and more user friendly USP Tactical (which was adopted by the Bundeswehr's Kommando Spezialkräfte and the German Navy's Kampfschwimmer as the P12), though it is in service with several militaries and police forces around the world. The pistol is legendary for its reliability; during its development, Heckler and Koch subjected it to rigorous tests, all of which it passed with flying colors. It was frozen to -42 Celsius (-43 Fahrenheit), then fired. It was then heated to 67 Celsius (152 Fahrenheit) and fired again. One notable test had a bullet be deliberately lodged in the barrel, and then another bullet fired to clear the obstruction. The barrel only bulged slightly (most guns would explode in response), and a subsequent shot grouping test showed little degradation in accuracy.
accuracy. It's also legendary for its price tag.



A major reason for the M1911's popularity in the US was because the modern pistol technique, originally taught by Colonel Jeff Cooper, favored the M1911 - Cooper was one of the gun's most devout followers, and many chose to follow his example. The "condition codes" that have been frequently adapted for a handgun's state of being loaded and ready was originally created in reference to the M1911 as well. The Assault Weapons Ban of 1993 also saw a resurgence in the weapon's popularity - the logic was that if you were limited to 10-round magazines, you might as well get something that's going to make each shot count.

Despite its age and the fact that its US police and military uses have sharply declined since the 1980's, it remains a ''very'' popular handgun for civilians and maintains a staunchly dedicated following to this day.

to:

A major reason for the M1911's popularity in the US was because the modern pistol technique, originally taught by Colonel Jeff Cooper, favored the M1911 - Cooper was one of the gun's most devout followers, and many chose to follow his example. The "condition codes" that have been frequently adapted for a handgun's state of being loaded and ready was originally created in reference to the M1911 as well. The Assault Weapons Ban of 1993 also saw a resurgence in the weapon's popularity - the logic was that if you were limited to 10-round magazines, you might as well get something that's going to make each shot count.

Despite its age and the fact that its
count. While US police and military uses have sharply declined since the 1980's, it remains a ''very'' popular handgun for civilians and maintains a staunchly dedicated following to this day.



If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's actually made in Croatia under the official designation, [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at [[RedNeck certain US gun buyers]] who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American". This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seem some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well.

to:

If you live in America, you probably know this gun as the Springfield XD, or possibly "The Other Plastic Pistol." This modern polymer pistol ''isn't'' actually made in America; it's actually made in Croatia under the official designation, [=HS2000=]. Springfield just snagged the rights to market the gun state-side. This has resulted in quite a bit of snickering at [[RedNeck certain US gun buyers]] buyers who are unaware of this and pick this over a Glock solely because they want to "buy American". This pistol has been in service since 1999 and has served admirably, and has seem seen some international success as a competitor to the ubiquitous Glock. The XD comes in 9x19, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, and .45 GAP in full size, compact, and subcompact sizes. The XD also features greatly-improved safety features over the Glock including a 1911-style grip safety, which is rare in modern designs but works very well.
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