History Comicbook / Watchmen

23rd Nov '17 8:29:29 PM JulianLapostat
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It is set in a realistic AlternateUniverse that mirrors the late 20th Century, except that incognito heroes similar in kind and nature to the pulp heroes of novels and Republic Pictures serials actually existed, serving as costumed crime-fighters of varying levels of efficacy. In the backstory, a group called the Minutemen (a [[Main/CaptainErsatz Captain Ersatz]] of DC's Justice Society) operate as heroes in the 1940s and early 1950s America, but then the world is drastically altered in the early 60's with the arrival of Dr. Manhattan, an actual ''super-powered'' being, the result of a FreakLabAccident. The latter half of the 20th Century sees the US, with Dr. Manhattan's help, winning UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar which then leads a greatly escalated UsefulNotes/ColdWar. At the start of the story, most of the original Minutemen are retired or dead, and their would-be successors, the Crimebusters, are now forbidden from crime-fighting by the passage of [[SuperRegistrationAct the Keene Act]] [[note]] ratified in 1977 during Nixon's ''third'' term[[/note]], with most retreating back to their private identities, though a few (including Dr. Manhattan) remain notable public figures. Only the emotionally unstable Rorschach carries on crime-fighting, although his violent tactics paint him to most as a vigilante rather than a hero, and he is a wanted fugitive by NYPD, living underground and off-the-grid.

The plot of ''Watchmen'' begins with the murder of Edward "The Comedian" Blake, a former member of both the Minutemen and the Crimebusters who also served as a American Black Ops technician in the Vietnam War. Rorschach begins to suspect that someone deliberately targeted Blake for his superhero past, and proceeds to warn his former acquaintances in the Crimebusters - Dan Dreiberg (Nite Owl II), Laurie Juspeczyk (Silk Spectre II), Dr. Manhattan, and Ozymandias - of a potential new threat. But this return from the past is only the start of a bigger mystery, one that will entangle the lives of the heroes with that of several other residents in New York City.

to:

It is set in a realistic AlternateUniverse that mirrors the late 20th Century, except that incognito heroes similar in kind and nature to the pulp heroes of novels and Republic Pictures serials actually existed, serving as costumed crime-fighters of varying levels of efficacy. In the backstory, a group called the Minutemen (a [[Main/CaptainErsatz Captain Ersatz]] of DC's Justice Society) operate as heroes in the 1940s and early 1950s America, but then the world is drastically altered in the early 60's with the arrival of Dr. Manhattan, an actual ''super-powered'' being, the result of a FreakLabAccident. The latter half of the 20th Century sees the US, with Dr. Manhattan's help, winning UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar which then leads a greatly escalated UsefulNotes/ColdWar. At the start of the story, most of the original Minutemen are retired or dead, and their would-be successors, the Crimebusters, are now forbidden from crime-fighting by the passage of [[SuperRegistrationAct the Keene Act]] [[note]] ratified in 1977 during Nixon's ''third'' term[[/note]], with most retreating back to their private identities, though a few (including Dr. Manhattan) remain notable public figures. Only the emotionally unstable Rorschach carries on crime-fighting, although his violent tactics paint him to most as a vigilante rather than a hero, and he is a wanted fugitive by NYPD, living underground and off-the-grid.

The plot of ''Watchmen'' begins with the murder of Edward "The Comedian" Blake, a former member of both the Minutemen and the Crimebusters who also served as a American Black Ops technician in the Vietnam War. Rorschach begins to suspect that someone deliberately targeted Blake for his superhero past, and proceeds to warn his former acquaintances in the Crimebusters - Dan Dreiberg (Nite Owl II), Laurie Juspeczyk (Silk Spectre II), Dr. Manhattan, and Ozymandias - of a potential new threat. But this return from the past is only the start of a bigger mystery, one that will entangle the lives of the heroes with that of several other residents in New York City.



** Ozymandias and The Comedian discuss this during the first (and only) meeting of the Crimebusters. Ozymandias wants to form a professional crime fighting group to shut down all crime but the Comedian notes that it's ridiculous and pointless in the shadow of the nuclear bomb and so long as none of them have a solution to deal with that, such crime-fighting is meaningless kid's stuff. Ozymandias sees The Comedian's comments as illustrating that a true superhero's capacity has to grow and expand to properly "save the world" and so abandons conventional superheroism outwardly while still committing himself to save the world by becoming a corporate magnate, scientist and WellIntentionedExtremist. Some would say that Ozymandias has undergone MotiveDecay but Ozy would insist that conventional heroes have to grow up to better tackle problems of the adult world of geopolitics, commerce and mass media. Indeed, when Nite Owl and Rorscharch meet Veidt in his lair, he is wearing his old superhero costume rather than the civilian clothing he had been wearing throughout the comic, which suggests that in his mind he sees his actions as superheroic even if it appears the contrary to his ex-Crimebusters.

to:

** Ozymandias and The Comedian discuss this during the first (and only) meeting of the Crimebusters. Ozymandias wants to form a professional crime fighting group to shut down all crime but the Comedian notes that it's ridiculous and pointless in the shadow of the nuclear bomb and so long as none of them have a solution to deal with that, such crime-fighting is meaningless kid's stuff. Ozymandias sees The Comedian's comments as illustrating that a true superhero's capacity has to grow and expand to properly "save the world" and so abandons conventional superheroism outwardly while still committing himself to save the world by becoming a corporate magnate, scientist and WellIntentionedExtremist. Some would say that Ozymandias has undergone MotiveDecay but Ozy would insist that conventional heroes have to grow up to better tackle problems of the adult world of geopolitics, commerce and mass media. Indeed, when Nite Owl and Rorscharch meet Veidt in his lair, he is wearing his old superhero costume rather than the civilian clothing he had been wearing throughout the comic, which suggests that in his mind he sees his actions as superheroic even if it appears the contrary to his ex-Crimebusters.ex-colleagues.



* WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway: '''''Inverted.''''' Typically, one of the FiveManBand has mediocre abilities, yet everyone from the Minutemen and Crimebusters apply to this trope when you consider that Dr. Manhattan is a God with a StoryBreakerPower by comparison.

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* WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway: '''''Inverted.''''' Typically, one of the FiveManBand has mediocre abilities, yet everyone from the Minutemen and the would-be Crimebusters apply to this trope when you consider that Dr. Manhattan is a God with a StoryBreakerPower by comparison.
23rd Nov '17 4:49:42 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''ComicBook/BeforeWatchmen'': A 2012-2013 prequel comic series focusing on the elaborate backstory of the original series. Neither Gibbons or Moore consider this to be canonical and it was left incomplete after weak sales. Notable for being the first follow-up to the original series by DC Comics after nearly 30 years of treating the original as a standalone work.

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* ** ''ComicBook/BeforeWatchmen'': A 2012-2013 prequel comic series focusing on the elaborate backstory of the original series. Neither Gibbons or Moore consider this to be canonical and it was left incomplete after weak sales. Notable for being the first follow-up to the original series by DC Comics after nearly 30 years of treating the original as a standalone work.
23rd Nov '17 4:46:47 PM JulianLapostat
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''Watchmen'' by Creator/AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons is a 12-Issue MiniSeries that was originally published from September, 1986 to October, 1987, published by Creator/DCComics, and subsequently printed as a single volume graphic novel.

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''Watchmen'' by Creator/AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons is a 12-Issue MiniSeries that was originally published ran from September, 1986 to October, 1987, published by Creator/DCComics, and subsequently printed as a single volume graphic novel.
23rd Nov '17 4:45:41 PM JulianLapostat
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It's FilmNoir. It's RaygunGothic. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] superhero story. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] superhero story. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]] superhero story -- some say it ''launched'' UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}. It's SciFi. It's CyberPunk. It's The Music/PirateJenny. It's AlternateHistory. It's [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical Political]]. It's a {{Deconstruction}} of superheroes. It's [[GenreBusting a lot of things.]] It's ''Watchmen'', the classic {{Deconstruction}} of the superhero genre that debuted in 1986 with writing from Creator/AlanMoore and art by Dave Gibbons. Its original run comprising of a twelve-issue MiniSeries that ran from September, 1986 to October, 1987.

It is set in a realistic alternate reality that mirrors the late 20th Century, except that incognito heroes similar in kind and nature to the pulp heroes of novels and Republic Pictures serials actually existed, serving as costumed crime-fighters of varying levels of efficacy.

A group called the Minutemen (a [[Main/CaptainErsatz Captain Ersatz]] of DC's Justice Society) operate as heroes in the 1940s and early 1950s America, but then the world is drastically altered in the early 60's with the arrival of Dr. Manhattan, an actual ''super-powered'' being, the result of a FreakLabAccident. The latter half of the 20th Century sees the US, with Dr. Manhattan's help, winning UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar which then leads a greatly escalated UsefulNotes/ColdWar. At the start of the story, most of the original Minutemen are retired or dead, and their successors, the Crimebusters, are now forbidden from crime-fighting by the passage of [[SuperRegistrationAct the Keene Act]] [[note]] ratified in 1977 during Nixon's ''third'' term[[/note]], with most retreating back to their private identities, though a few (including Dr. Manhattan) become notable public figures. Only the emotionally unstable Rorschach carries on crime-fighting, although his violent tactics paint him to most as a vigilante rather than a hero.

to:

It's FilmNoir. It's RaygunGothic. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] superhero story. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] superhero story. It's a [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]] superhero story -- some say it ''launched'' UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}. It's SciFi. It's CyberPunk. It's The Music/PirateJenny. It's AlternateHistory. It's [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical Political]]. It's a {{Deconstruction}} of superheroes. It's [[GenreBusting a lot of things.]] It's ''Watchmen'', the classic {{Deconstruction}} of the superhero genre that debuted in 1986 with writing from ''Watchmen'' by Creator/AlanMoore and art by Dave Gibbons. Its original run comprising of Gibbons is a twelve-issue 12-Issue MiniSeries that ran was originally published from September, 1986 to October, 1987.

It is set in a realistic alternate reality that mirrors the late 20th Century, except that incognito heroes similar in kind
1987, published by Creator/DCComics, and nature to the pulp heroes of novels and Republic Pictures serials actually existed, serving subsequently printed as costumed crime-fighters of varying levels of efficacy.a single volume graphic novel.

A It is set in a realistic AlternateUniverse that mirrors the late 20th Century, except that incognito heroes similar in kind and nature to the pulp heroes of novels and Republic Pictures serials actually existed, serving as costumed crime-fighters of varying levels of efficacy. In the backstory, a group called the Minutemen (a [[Main/CaptainErsatz Captain Ersatz]] of DC's Justice Society) operate as heroes in the 1940s and early 1950s America, but then the world is drastically altered in the early 60's with the arrival of Dr. Manhattan, an actual ''super-powered'' being, the result of a FreakLabAccident. The latter half of the 20th Century sees the US, with Dr. Manhattan's help, winning UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar which then leads a greatly escalated UsefulNotes/ColdWar. At the start of the story, most of the original Minutemen are retired or dead, and their would-be successors, the Crimebusters, are now forbidden from crime-fighting by the passage of [[SuperRegistrationAct the Keene Act]] [[note]] ratified in 1977 during Nixon's ''third'' term[[/note]], with most retreating back to their private identities, though a few (including Dr. Manhattan) become remain notable public figures. Only the emotionally unstable Rorschach carries on crime-fighting, although his violent tactics paint him to most as a vigilante rather than a hero.
hero, and he is a wanted fugitive by NYPD, living underground and off-the-grid.



For the first 25 years of its publication history, ''Watchmen'' was a standalone work, albeit one that has become highly influential on the storytelling of the main DC Comics continuities. Despite both Moore and Gibbons maintaining that their original graphic novel is ''the'' canon story, as they conceived it to stand on its own, ''Watchmen'' has since creeped into other works.

In 2012, DC Comics published a prequel series titled ''ComicBook/BeforeWatchmen'', [[LooseCanon which did not involve Alan Moore or Dave Gibbons]], while the 2016 ComicBook/DCRebirth one-shot revealed that some aspects of ''Watchmen'' may actually be incorporated into the mainstream DC universe. Surely enough, the ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' / ''[[ComicBook/TheFlash Flash]]'' crossover ''ComicBook/TheButton'' teased further developments for their prospects in the DCU, while the twelve-issue 2017 event series ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' will explicitly feature Dr. Manhattan (and possibly others) in the story.

The graphic novel was adapted ([[DevelopmentHell after several attempts]]) into the 2009 film ''[[Film/{{Watchmen}} Watchmen]]'', which also spawned a tie-in prequel game --''Watchmen: The End is Nigh''-- which focuses on Nite Owl II and Rorschach. Two longer cuts of the film (the "Director's Cut" and the ''three-and-a-half hour'' "Ultimate Cut") released on home video adapt even more of the book. While Dave Gibbons served as a creative consultant on the film, Moore (as he has done with the film adaptations of his work) had no involvement and remains uncredited.

A television series based on ''Watchmen'' has similarly faced a long development process. Originally announced for Creator/{{HBO}} in 2014, plans were halted due to creative difficulties. In July 2017, the network announced they'd brought the project back into development, with Damon Lindelof (''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/TheLeftovers'') onboard as showrunner and Gibbons serving as a creative consultant. HBO's ''Watchmen'' officially received a pilot order (with additional scripts) in September 2017, and it will likely premiere sometime during the 2018 -- 2019 season.

to:

For the first 25 years of Although originally conceived by its publication history, ''Watchmen'' was writer-artist team as a standalone work, albeit one that has become highly influential on the storytelling of the main DC Comics continuities. Despite both Moore and Gibbons maintaining that their original graphic novel is ''the'' canon story, as they conceived it to stand on its own, entry, ''Watchmen'' has since creeped seen a number of adaptations into other works.different mediums and follow-ups. With a single exception, neither Moore nor Gibbons consider the later entries to be canonical and see them primarily as adaptations and derivative works:

* In 1986, Mayfair Games, ran a series of RPG Games based on ''Watchmen'' : "Who Watches the Watchmen", "Taking Out the Trash" and "The Watchmen Sourcebook". This is the only adaptation of ''Watchmen'' to have the full support and co-operation of both Moore and Gibbons, and the only one which they consider to have canonical status, albeit as ExpandedUniverse.
* ''Script/{{Watchmen}}'': A planned script of the film adaptation by Sam Hamm that was made with Alan Moore's feedback for a project that was originally going to be directed by Creator/TerryGilliam.
* ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'': A 2009 film adaptation directed by Creator/ZackSnyder, unrelated to the Hamm-Gilliam project.
* ''Watchmen: The End is Nigh'': A 2009 2-part episodic game that served as a tie-in to the movies released on PC, UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/Xbox360, featuring Rorschach and Nite Owl.
* In 2012, DC Comics inaugurated the start of a series of projects that ultimately set the stage for a proper follow-up to Watchmen to incorporate it into the wider DC Comics Universe:
* ''ComicBook/BeforeWatchmen'': A 2012-2013 prequel comic series focusing on the elaborate backstory of the original series. Neither Gibbons or Moore consider this to be canonical and it was left incomplete after weak sales. Notable for being the first follow-up to the original series by DC Comics after nearly 30 years of treating the original as a standalone work.
** The 2015-2016 ContinuityReboot ''ComicBook/DCRebirth'' one-shot revealed that some aspects of ''Watchmen'' will be incorporated into the mainstream DC universe with a MythArc and meta-narrative dealing with the comic and its legacy, one which was teased out in the ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' / ''[[ComicBook/TheFlash Flash]]'' crossover ''ComicBook/TheButton''.
** ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' by Creator/GeoffJohns, Gary Frank and colorist Brad Anderson is the sequel series of the original Watchmen, that will ultimately see the characters of Watchmen cross-over with the main DC Universe.
* In July 2017, Creator/{{HBO}} announced plans to convert the graphic novel into a Miniseries for television with Damon Lindelof (''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/TheLeftovers'') onboard as showrunner and Gibbons serving as a creative consultant.


In 2012, DC Comics published a prequel series titled ''ComicBook/BeforeWatchmen'', [[LooseCanon which did not involve Alan Moore or Dave Gibbons]], while the 2016 ComicBook/DCRebirth one-shot revealed that some aspects of ''Watchmen'' may actually be incorporated into the mainstream DC universe. Surely enough, the ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' / ''[[ComicBook/TheFlash Flash]]'' crossover ''ComicBook/TheButton'' teased further developments for their prospects in the DCU, while the twelve-issue 2017 event series ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' will explicitly feature Dr. Manhattan (and possibly others) in the story.

The graphic novel was adapted ([[DevelopmentHell after several attempts]]) into the 2009 film ''[[Film/{{Watchmen}} Watchmen]]'', which also spawned a tie-in prequel game --''Watchmen: The End is Nigh''-- which focuses on Nite Owl II and Rorschach. Two longer cuts of the film (the "Director's Cut" and the ''three-and-a-half hour'' "Ultimate Cut") released on home video adapt even more of the book. While Dave Gibbons served as a creative consultant on the film, Moore (as he has done with the film adaptations of his work) had no involvement and remains uncredited.

A television series based on ''Watchmen'' has similarly faced a long development process. Originally announced for Creator/{{HBO}} in 2014, plans were halted due to creative difficulties. In July 2017, the network announced they'd brought the project back into development, with Damon Lindelof (''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/TheLeftovers'') onboard as showrunner and Gibbons serving as a creative consultant. HBO's ''Watchmen'' officially received a pilot order (with additional scripts) in September 2017, and it will likely premiere sometime during the 2018 -- 2019 season.
18th Nov '17 5:58:11 PM nieunieux
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The plot of ''Watchmen'' begins with the murder of Edward "The Comedian" Blake, a former member of both the Minutemen and the Crimebusters who also served as a American Black Ops technician in the Vietnam War. Rorschach begins to suspect that someone deliberately targeted Blake for his superhero past, and proceeds to warn his former acquaintances in the Crimebusters - Dan Dreiberg (Nite Owl II), Sally Jupiter (Silk Spectre II), Dr. Manhattan, and Ozymandias - of a potential new threat. But this return from the past is only the start of a bigger mystery, one that will entangle the lives of the heroes with that of several other residents in New York City.

to:

The plot of ''Watchmen'' begins with the murder of Edward "The Comedian" Blake, a former member of both the Minutemen and the Crimebusters who also served as a American Black Ops technician in the Vietnam War. Rorschach begins to suspect that someone deliberately targeted Blake for his superhero past, and proceeds to warn his former acquaintances in the Crimebusters - Dan Dreiberg (Nite Owl II), Sally Jupiter Laurie Juspeczyk (Silk Spectre II), Dr. Manhattan, and Ozymandias - of a potential new threat. But this return from the past is only the start of a bigger mystery, one that will entangle the lives of the heroes with that of several other residents in New York City.
12th Nov '17 5:07:07 PM SinNanna
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* AttemptedRape (see also RapeAsDrama)

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* AttemptedRape (see also RapeAsDrama)AttemptedRape: The Comedian, to the first Silk Spectre. It was fortunately stopped by Hooded Justice, and causes both Hollis Mason and Sally Jupiter to hate him even years later.



%%* BigRottenApple

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%%* BigRottenApple* BigRottenApple: Despite the upscale areas looking like a RaygunGothic ShiningCity, New York City is portrayed as being wracked by poverty and social unrest, like how New York City really was at the time the comic was written.



* PurpleProse: The narration caps in ''Tales Of The Black Freighter'', the [[ShowWithinAShow Comic Within A Comic]].

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* PurpleProse: The narration caps in ''Tales Of The Black Freighter'', the [[ShowWithinAShow Comic Within A Comic]].Comic]], which seems to be a tribute to the narration style of Creator/HPLovecraft.


Added DiffLines:

* RealitySubtext: Many of the excerpts from Hollis Mason's autobiography talking about the rise of costumed heroes, the psychology behind them, and their effects on society sound like they could be talking about the real life phenomenon of superhero comics. It may also qualify as an AuthorTract, considering Alan Moore's own stated views on the genre in interviews.
6th Nov '17 11:36:51 AM JulianLapostat
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* SociopathicHero: Rorschach and the Comedian. Deconstructed. while it quickly becomes clear that instead of being a CaptainPatriotic, the Comedian is one of these, we just learn latter that

to:

that even acting like a sociopath has its drawbacks - his brutality alienated everybody from him on the scale that he cannot form a human relationship anymore. While he clearly wants to reconcile with his daughter, he is incapable of that, at first because he is awkward in relationships and than because Laurie despises him for his attempted rape of her mother. And when he is desperate because of Ozymandias' plan, where does he go? To one of his former enemies', where he breaks down sobbing, instead of another vigilante.
* SociopathicHero: Rorschach SomethingElseAlsoRises: ...that flamethrower...
** Though at least it wasn't the air-to-air missiles.
* SpannerInTheWorks: Appears to be the case, but, of course, is all part of Ozzie's plan.
** The ending has hints of a really major case maybe about to happen. See CliffHanger, above.
* SpeciesLoyalty: Ozzie's plan turns on this.
* SpreadingDisasterMapGraphic: This is used to demonstrate the damages of a nuclear attack by the Soviet Union, when Dr. Manhattan isn't there to prevent it.
* StatusQuoIsGod: There is still a Cold War despite the heroes existence in the real world.
* StealthPun:
** Fits in nicely with FridgeBrilliance: Jon, an aspiring watchmaker who was told to forgo the business due to the atomic bomb, has the accident that leads to his PhysicalGod status because his first girlfriend's '''watch''' was ''stepped on'' by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_man a fat man]].
** There's a very clever one in ''Fearful Symmetry''. The pirate-themed Rum Runner sign has two [[TheBackwardsR Rs back to back]] so they resemble a skull. It fits the symmetry theme, but there's another thing you might not have noticed unless you know Cyrillic: the sign says [[TalkLikeAPirate Yar]]![[note]]Actually, you have to know the Cyrillic ''and'' Roman lettering systems to get that; in English it's "Backwards R - "R" and in Cyrilic it's "Ya" - "Backwards Ya", since the Roman R character does not exist in Cyrillic
and the Comedian. character for the same sound looks like a Roman P.[[/note]]
* StopWorshippingMe: Dr. Manhattan is powerful enough to be considered divine, but resents being perceived this way. He says something like "I don't think there is a God, and if there is I don't think I'm anything like Him".
* StoryWithinAStory: ''Tales of the Black Freighter''.
* {{Stripperiffic}}: An odd LampshadeHanging, in which a character uses it as a warped justification for AttemptedRape. It's also noticeable that the costume was only very Stripperiffic by 1940 standards, as it's a very short backless gown with stockings.
** Further lampshade hanging when her daughter/successor complains about how ridiculous her own costume was. Unlampshaded when she puts the costume on for her new boyfriend and doesn't stop wearing it for the rest of the series (though there wasn't time to get a new one).
** And let's not forget Dr. Manhattan, whose progressively-diminished costume provides a Stripperific clue as to how far back in his personal timeline each of his flashback appearances lies. The fact that he's first seen buck-naked, and is only later seen in skin-tight bodysuits or Speedos, may be a bit of a joke on this trope.
* SuperheroesWearCapes: Deconstructed (like everything else) with the character of Dollar Bill. He was a former football player hired by a bank when they realized that having their own personal superhero on payroll was a great way to cash in on the masked vigilante craze. The costume was designed by the marketing department, who were going for style over practicality and thought that the cape added visual appeal. It ended up getting caught in a revolving door while he was trying to stop a robbery, at which point one of the robbers shot him point-blank in the chest.
** Nite Owl I's original costume had a cape, but when he failed to master the art of walking around ''his own house'' with it on without the cape catching on things, he got rid of it.
** This deconstruction was carried over into the CGI animated film ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' with heavy nods to ''Watchmen''.
* SuperpowerLottery:
Deconstructed. Dr. Manhattan is a nigh-omnipotent, nigh-omniscient being, and the only one who has any superpower whatsoever. Yet he is so unmotivated and detached that he lets himself become a puppet of government, is one of those characters who can be manipulated very easily, and has really hard time using his own powers not just for others', but for his own good.
* SuperRegistrationAct: The Keene Act, with all that followed. Only a few refused to sign it, but it appears there's not a lot of superheroes around anymore.
* TeleportationSickness: Others besides Dr. Manhattan tend to find his teleporting them unpleasant, some rioters even suffering heart attacks when he puts them back home.
** Though Manhattan's narration points out that this was due at least partly to the shock of suddenly finding themselves back home.
* ThatManIsDead
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': "I no longer wish to look at dead things."
-->'''Rorschach''': "It was Kovacs who closed his eyes but it was Rorschach that opened them again."
* ThatWasntARequest:
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': Pay attention. You will all return to your homes.\\
'''Protester''': Oh yeah? And what if we don't, ya big blue fruit?\\
'''Dr. Manhattan''': You misunderstand me. It was not a request.
* TherapyIsForTheWeak: Rorschach certainly thinks so, and demonstrates on his prison therapist.
* ThereAreNoTherapists: Deconstructed. Psychotherapy was new in the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII world but lack of understanding of psychological care causes Mothman's breakdown. Dr. Long (Rorschach's shrink) shows how impossible it is to understand the mind of a "hero".
* TheTokyoFireball: Only [[BigApplesauce in New York]], and it's more of a human-brain LogicBomb.
* TheyFightCrime: Deconstructed. Rorschach and Dreiberg's differences in temperament make their partnership almost impossible.
* TheyShouldHaveSentAPoet: Every part of the Mars scene.
* ThrowAwayCountry: Averted strongly. The series takes great pains to introduce us to a variety of ordinary New Yorkers with lives and personalities of their own. It then takes great pains to show all of their corpses in the aftermath.
* TitleDrop: Ozymandias gives one for the whole comic:
-->'''Ozymandias''': Even read [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK's]] intended speech? "We in this country, in this generation are, by destiny rather than choice, the watchmen on the walls of world freedom."
** The chapter titles are also title dropped with little quotations at the end of each one.
* TokenSuper: Doctor Manhattan is the TropeCodifier, winning big on the SuperpowerLottery and ending up as the only hero in the Watchmen continuity to have powers, which are [[PhysicalGod god-like]]. The rest of the Watchmen are all {{Non Powered Costumed Hero}}s.
* TooDumbToLive: The prisoners in the jail Rorschach was sent to. No matter WHAT he does to any of them, they are determined to get at him.
* TheTopicOfCancer: Doctor Manhattan is extremely distraught to discover that the radiation emitted by his physical avatar gave his friends cancer. This has actually been a ploy by Ozymandias, [[MoralEventHorizon who gave them cancer himself]].
* TotalitarianUtilitarian: Adrian Veidt.
* TrespassingToTalk: Rorscharch frequently does this, both to his friends and enemies. In one case, leaving a Right Behind You message in the victim's fridge.
* TwinThreesomeFantasy: Subverted, as Laurie is disturbed by Manhattan cloning himself in the bedroom -- and eventually enraged when she sees [[CoitusUninterruptus another duplicate still working in the lab.]]
* TwistedEchoCut: Used repeatedly, especially at scene changes between ''Tales of the Black Freighter'' and the main plot. For example, it cuts from the newsstand owner talking about how newsvendors are tough survivors, to a shipwreck survivor standing on a beach crying. Or from Nite Owl saying "It'll be like coming home," to the shipwrecked man finally arriving on the mainland. "I could be no more than twenty miles from Davidstown. I was home."
* TwoForOneShow: The pirate comic-within-a-comic tells a full story from beginning to end, and mirrors many turning points in the overall story.
* TwoScenesOneDialogue: Background conversations, or banter coming from a nearby TV, which are also relevant to the main scene. ''The Black Freighter'' also sometimes mirrors some of the smaller events happening around the newsstand where it is being read. This is a trademark of ''Watchmen''.
* UglyHeroGoodLookingVillain: Rorschach is quite homely and short, both of which are mentioned in-story at least once. Also, he smells bad, dresses scruffily and has terrible table manners. He's a NobleBigot, a rape apologist, a NietzscheWannabe ... but, then again, Rorschach [[PayEvilUntoEvil only kills dangerous criminals]]. Ozymandias, is attractive in a sort of fey, {{Bishounen}} way and WickedCultured. While Rorschach and Ozymandias are both {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s, Rorschach ''[[NeverHurtAnInnocent never]]'' hurt an innocent person throughout the whole story, whereas Ozymandias killed two million innocent people with the intention of saving billions from nuclear war. This kind of pushes Rorschach into an AntiHero
while Ozymandias is more of an AntiVillain, so this mostly plays the trope straight.
** [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation Possibly]] [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zagged]] at the end. While Ozymandias may have saved the world,
it quickly becomes clear that may only be temporary and thus unnecessary (making Rorschach's exposure of Ozymandias' plan more of a deserved justice). If it was a true success, then maybe Rorschach's actions will instead lead to nuclear war all over again.
* UnbuiltTrope: Even though it started UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, this comic really reads, in retrospect, like a deconstruction
of being a CaptainPatriotic, the very things it inspired.
** Rorschach, Dr. Manhattan, and
the Comedian are all the exact kind of grim, dark anti-heroes that arose in the 90's but this is not portrayed as a positive thing at all. Rorschach and Comedian are sociopathic lunatics who are hated and feared by many and Manhattan is a fatalistic and emotionless person whose behavior causes his personal life to fall to pieces. Moore's point was that neurotic and complex human shades [[RealityEnsues would make superheroes relatable but also unstable and non-functional]] while his copycats saw it as [[DramaticallyMissingThePoint an attempt to make superheroes cool]].
** Indeed the most functional and effective characters in the entire story are more or less the ones who are most like the classic Silver Age characters. Dan Dreiberg, the BoringButPractical Blue Beetle knock off is a far better detective than Rorschach, and his equipment is the one that busts Rorschach out of jail and takes them to Antarctica. Likewise, Ozymandias is more or less a classic pulp Doc Savage type character, whose CharlesAtlasSuperpower is not subject to any {{Deconstruction}} at all, and is used for drama when it makes him an utterly undefeatable villain (on whom Rorschach cannot land a punch).
* TheUnfettered: The Comedian, Dr. Manhattan and Rorschach. Ozymandias.
* UnstuckInTime: Dr. Manhattan becomes briefly disoriented because of tachyons. ''"Excuse me, Rorschach. I'm informing Laurie ninety seconds ago... I-I'm sorry. It's these tachyons."''
** If you flip the two pages of the graphic novel back and forth when he says this, Manhattan is in the same position on both pages, in the same pose, saying the same thing, highlighting his non-linear perception of time.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom:
** After the Comedian's death, Rorschach approaches Veidt with the possibility of a serial killer targeting former heroes, completely unaware that Veidt killed the Comedian for unrelated reasons. A single panel shows Veidt contemplating Rorschach's suggestion, and then Veidt begins killing masks in earnest as a RedHerring.
** Rorschach again, when he leaves his journal for a tabloid to discover, including all his incriminating evidence against Veidt and his new utopia.
* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Ozymandius has a pet genetically modified lynx, Bubastis.
* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: Turns out to be the whole plot.
* ViewerFriendlyInterface: "HELLO ADRIAN HERE ARE THE FILES YOU NEED"
* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This graphic novel ostensibly takes place in America with American characters, but one character mentions "having a lock fitted". An American would say "having a lock ''installed''".
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Rorschach and Veidt.
* WhamEpisode: For comics (this is still widely considered
one of these, the best and most influential comics ever written, and one of the best novels).
** The climax of issue #11.
* WhamLine:
** "I did it thirty-five minutes ago."
** "Can't a guy talk to, y'know, his good friend's daughter?" The wham comes from the realization that two of the words in the sentence are false.
* WhamShot: The opening pages of issue #12 are an extended one. Half the cast has died horribly. It's implied that Laurie and Osterman are the only living things in New York City.
* WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway: '''''Inverted.''''' Typically, one of the FiveManBand has mediocre abilities, yet everyone from the Minutemen and Crimebusters apply to this trope when you consider that Dr. Manhattan is a God with a StoryBreakerPower by comparison.
* WhatMeasureIsANonSuper: Deconstructed. In the series,
we often find that ordinary police officers are more than capable of defeating Rorschach by going all ZergRush on him where Batman for instance is always able to defeat and escape multiple police officers and mooks in comics, likewise Dr. Malcolm Long is cut from a different and altogether more heroic cloth than the usual simplistic brand of psychotherapy typical of superhero comics.
* WhatTheHellHero: Everybody, but most pronounced in the scene where the Comedian calls out Dr. Manhattan for not doing anything to save his (the Comedian's) AsianBabyMama despite knowing exactly what would happen. Ironically, it cements Dr. Manhattan's view that they're essentially the same. But for the biggest example, see the [[YMMV/{{Watchmen}} YMMV]] page.
** This is essentially Rorschach's entire mode of operation.
* WhiteDwarfStarlet: The first Night Owl and Silk Specter prefer talking about their GloryDays.
* WhoWatchesTheWatchmen
* WhoShotJFK: It's hinted that it might have been the Comedian.
* WouldntHitAGirl: Beats up, shoots and stabs this trope.
* WorldOfBadass: Both played straight and deconstructed. The heroes are seriously screwed up people, yet surprisingly capable of kicking ass when needed.
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Several examples:
** Malcolm Long initially faces an existential crisis after being confronted with Rorschach's grim worldview and horrible life experiences. He ends up making two speeches, one questions the hollow nature of his profession and middle class life, the other reconciles him with that reality.
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"I looked at the Rorschach blot. I tried to pretend it looked like a spreading tree, shadows pooled beneath it, but it didn't. It looked more like a dead cat I once found, the fat, glistening grubs writhing blindly, squirming over each other, frantically tunneling away from the light. But even that is avoiding the real horror. The horror is this: In the end, it is simply a picture of empty meaningless blackness. We are alone. There is nothing else."''
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"In a world like this, it's all we can do, try and help each other. [[TheAntiNihilist It's all that means anything.]]"''
** Dr. Manhattan later gives a more traditional one:
--> '''Dr. Manhattan''': ''" I have walked across the surface of the sun. I have witnessed events so tiny and so fast, they could hardly be said to have occurred at all. But you, Adrian, you're
just learn latter thata man. The world's smartest man poses no more threat to me than does its smartest termite."''
* WrittenSoundEffect: Half averted: fight scenes are silent, but there is a wide and surprising variety of onomatopoeia for ''dialogue''.
** Such as The Comedian drinking: "''nk nk nk''".
** Rorschach eating: "''Ronch ronch ronch/Cronch cronch cronch''" (sugar cubes) or "''Schlorp... chlorp... lep...''" (raw baked beans).
** Rorschach thinking: "''Hurm...''"
** Rorschach yelling: '''''RRAAAARRL'''''
** All of those straddle the line between this and actual dialogue, being vocalized.
* YouAreTooLate: Thirty-five minutes late, to be exact.
* YouBastard: If you believe Ozymandias was right, you're okay with killing several million people and lying to the entire world to trick it into peace. If you believe Rorschach was right, you believe that Ozymandias's scheme should be revealed to the world in the name of justice, even if it means sending the world back to the brink of nuclear holocaust.
* YouCannotChangeTheFuture: Extensively discussed by Dr. Manhattan, see [[Characters/{{Watchmen}} Character page]] for details. ''Excuse us, troper, you're already reading that entry 90 seconds ago...''
* YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness: Ozymandias poisons his assistants, and congratulates them for helping create a new utopia (as they are either dead or dying), then lets their bodies be hidden by snow cover. Later, he tells the others that his assistants accidentally killed themselves. He also blows up the artists who helped create the monster.
** Big Figure has one of his mooks kill another when Rorschach ties the unlucky mook's hands to his cell door, obstructing the others from coming in to get him.
* ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld: Airships are far more common, because [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Dr. Manhattan can synthesize enough helium to make them cost-effective]] (and safer than hydrogen-filled airships would have been).

----
--> Nothing ends, Troper. Nothing ever ends.
----
6th Nov '17 10:54:36 AM BeastC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BrickJoke: Nite Owl's robotic armor, which he never used more than once [[OldShame after he broke his arm trying to use it.]] When the police storm Nite Owl's hideout, the suit is the only thing that he left behind!

to:

* BrickJoke: BrickJoke:
**
Nite Owl's robotic armor, which he never used more than once [[OldShame after he broke his arm trying to use it.]] When the police storm Nite Owl's hideout, the suit is the only thing that he left behind!behind!
** In the same chapter, a lock repairman promises Dan that the new, improved lock can hold off an army. An army of policemen easily breaks it when kicking the door down.



* RunningGag: Dan's lock keeps getting broken. Damn it, Rorschach.



* SociopathicHero: Rorschach and the Comedian. Deconstructed. while it quickly becomes clear that instead of being a CaptainPatriotic, the Comedian is one of these, we just learn latter that even acting like a sociopath has its drawbacks - his brutality alienated everybody from him on the scale that he cannot form a human relationship anymore. While he clearly wants to reconcile with his daughter, he is incapable of that, at first because he is awkward in relationships and than because Laurie despises him for his attempted rape of her mother. And when he is desperate because of Ozymandias' plan, where does he go? To one of his former enemies', where he breaks down sobbing, instead of another vigilante.
* SomethingElseAlsoRises: ...that flamethrower...
** Though at least it wasn't the air-to-air missiles.
* SpannerInTheWorks: Appears to be the case, but, of course, is all part of Ozzie's plan.
** The ending has hints of a really major case maybe about to happen. See CliffHanger, above.
* SpeciesLoyalty: Ozzie's plan turns on this.
* SpreadingDisasterMapGraphic: This is used to demonstrate the damages of a nuclear attack by the Soviet Union, when Dr. Manhattan isn't there to prevent it.
* StatusQuoIsGod: There is still a Cold War despite the heroes existence in the real world.
* StealthPun:
** Fits in nicely with FridgeBrilliance: Jon, an aspiring watchmaker who was told to forgo the business due to the atomic bomb, has the accident that leads to his PhysicalGod status because his first girlfriend's '''watch''' was ''stepped on'' by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_man a fat man]].
** There's a very clever one in ''Fearful Symmetry''. The pirate-themed Rum Runner sign has two [[TheBackwardsR Rs back to back]] so they resemble a skull. It fits the symmetry theme, but there's another thing you might not have noticed unless you know Cyrillic: the sign says [[TalkLikeAPirate Yar]]![[note]]Actually, you have to know the Cyrillic ''and'' Roman lettering systems to get that; in English it's "Backwards R - "R" and in Cyrilic it's "Ya" - "Backwards Ya", since the Roman R character does not exist in Cyrillic and the character for the same sound looks like a Roman P.[[/note]]
* StopWorshippingMe: Dr. Manhattan is powerful enough to be considered divine, but resents being perceived this way. He says something like "I don't think there is a God, and if there is I don't think I'm anything like Him".
* StoryWithinAStory: ''Tales of the Black Freighter''.
* {{Stripperiffic}}: An odd LampshadeHanging, in which a character uses it as a warped justification for AttemptedRape. It's also noticeable that the costume was only very Stripperiffic by 1940 standards, as it's a very short backless gown with stockings.
** Further lampshade hanging when her daughter/successor complains about how ridiculous her own costume was. Unlampshaded when she puts the costume on for her new boyfriend and doesn't stop wearing it for the rest of the series (though there wasn't time to get a new one).
** And let's not forget Dr. Manhattan, whose progressively-diminished costume provides a Stripperific clue as to how far back in his personal timeline each of his flashback appearances lies. The fact that he's first seen buck-naked, and is only later seen in skin-tight bodysuits or Speedos, may be a bit of a joke on this trope.
* SuperheroesWearCapes: Deconstructed (like everything else) with the character of Dollar Bill. He was a former football player hired by a bank when they realized that having their own personal superhero on payroll was a great way to cash in on the masked vigilante craze. The costume was designed by the marketing department, who were going for style over practicality and thought that the cape added visual appeal. It ended up getting caught in a revolving door while he was trying to stop a robbery, at which point one of the robbers shot him point-blank in the chest.
** Nite Owl I's original costume had a cape, but when he failed to master the art of walking around ''his own house'' with it on without the cape catching on things, he got rid of it.
** This deconstruction was carried over into the CGI animated film ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' with heavy nods to ''Watchmen''.
* SuperpowerLottery: Deconstructed. Dr. Manhattan is a nigh-omnipotent, nigh-omniscient being, and the only one who has any superpower whatsoever. Yet he is so unmotivated and detached that he lets himself become a puppet of government, is one of those characters who can be manipulated very easily, and has really hard time using his own powers not just for others', but for his own good.
* SuperRegistrationAct: The Keene Act, with all that followed. Only a few refused to sign it, but it appears there's not a lot of superheroes around anymore.
* TeleportationSickness: Others besides Dr. Manhattan tend to find his teleporting them unpleasant, some rioters even suffering heart attacks when he puts them back home.
** Though Manhattan's narration points out that this was due at least partly to the shock of suddenly finding themselves back home.
* ThatManIsDead
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': "I no longer wish to look at dead things."
-->'''Rorschach''': "It was Kovacs who closed his eyes but it was Rorschach that opened them again."
* ThatWasntARequest:
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': Pay attention. You will all return to your homes.\\
'''Protester''': Oh yeah? And what if we don't, ya big blue fruit?\\
'''Dr. Manhattan''': You misunderstand me. It was not a request.
* TherapyIsForTheWeak: Rorschach certainly thinks so, and demonstrates on his prison therapist.
* ThereAreNoTherapists: Deconstructed. Psychotherapy was new in the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII world but lack of understanding of psychological care causes Mothman's breakdown. Dr. Long (Rorschach's shrink) shows how impossible it is to understand the mind of a "hero".
* TheTokyoFireball: Only [[BigApplesauce in New York]], and it's more of a human-brain LogicBomb.
* TheyFightCrime: Deconstructed. Rorschach and Dreiberg's differences in temperament make their partnership almost impossible.
* TheyShouldHaveSentAPoet: Every part of the Mars scene.
* ThrowAwayCountry: Averted strongly. The series takes great pains to introduce us to a variety of ordinary New Yorkers with lives and personalities of their own. It then takes great pains to show all of their corpses in the aftermath.
* TitleDrop: Ozymandias gives one for the whole comic:
-->'''Ozymandias''': Even read [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK's]] intended speech? "We in this country, in this generation are, by destiny rather than choice, the watchmen on the walls of world freedom."
** The chapter titles are also title dropped with little quotations at the end of each one.
* TokenSuper: Doctor Manhattan is the TropeCodifier, winning big on the SuperpowerLottery and ending up as the only hero in the Watchmen continuity to have powers, which are [[PhysicalGod god-like]]. The rest of the Watchmen are all {{Non Powered Costumed Hero}}s.
* TooDumbToLive: The prisoners in the jail Rorschach was sent to. No matter WHAT he does to any of them, they are determined to get at him.
* TheTopicOfCancer: Doctor Manhattan is extremely distraught to discover that the radiation emitted by his physical avatar gave his friends cancer. This has actually been a ploy by Ozymandias, [[MoralEventHorizon who gave them cancer himself]].
* TotalitarianUtilitarian: Adrian Veidt.
* TrespassingToTalk: Rorscharch frequently does this, both to his friends and enemies. In one case, leaving a Right Behind You message in the victim's fridge.
* TwinThreesomeFantasy: Subverted, as Laurie is disturbed by Manhattan cloning himself in the bedroom -- and eventually enraged when she sees [[CoitusUninterruptus another duplicate still working in the lab.]]
* TwistedEchoCut: Used repeatedly, especially at scene changes between ''Tales of the Black Freighter'' and the main plot. For example, it cuts from the newsstand owner talking about how newsvendors are tough survivors, to a shipwreck survivor standing on a beach crying. Or from Nite Owl saying "It'll be like coming home," to the shipwrecked man finally arriving on the mainland. "I could be no more than twenty miles from Davidstown. I was home."
* TwoForOneShow: The pirate comic-within-a-comic tells a full story from beginning to end, and mirrors many turning points in the overall story.
* TwoScenesOneDialogue: Background conversations, or banter coming from a nearby TV, which are also relevant to the main scene. ''The Black Freighter'' also sometimes mirrors some of the smaller events happening around the newsstand where it is being read. This is a trademark of ''Watchmen''.
* UglyHeroGoodLookingVillain: Rorschach is quite homely and short, both of which are mentioned in-story at least once. Also, he smells bad, dresses scruffily and has terrible table manners. He's a NobleBigot, a rape apologist, a NietzscheWannabe ... but, then again, Rorschach [[PayEvilUntoEvil only kills dangerous criminals]]. Ozymandias, is attractive in a sort of fey, {{Bishounen}} way and WickedCultured. While Rorschach and Ozymandias are both {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s, Rorschach ''[[NeverHurtAnInnocent never]]'' hurt an innocent person throughout the whole story, whereas Ozymandias killed two million innocent people with the intention of saving billions from nuclear war. This kind of pushes Rorschach into an AntiHero while Ozymandias is more of an AntiVillain, so this mostly plays the trope straight.
** [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation Possibly]] [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zagged]] at the end. While Ozymandias may have saved the world, it may only be temporary and thus unnecessary (making Rorschach's exposure of Ozymandias' plan more of a deserved justice). If it was a true success, then maybe Rorschach's actions will instead lead to nuclear war all over again.
* UnbuiltTrope: Even though it started UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, this comic really reads, in retrospect, like a deconstruction of the very things it inspired.
** Rorschach, Dr. Manhattan, and the Comedian are all the exact kind of grim, dark anti-heroes that arose in the 90's but this is not portrayed as a positive thing at all. Rorschach and Comedian are sociopathic lunatics who are hated and feared by many and Manhattan is a fatalistic and emotionless person whose behavior causes his personal life to fall to pieces. Moore's point was that neurotic and complex human shades [[RealityEnsues would make superheroes relatable but also unstable and non-functional]] while his copycats saw it as [[DramaticallyMissingThePoint an attempt to make superheroes cool]].
** Indeed the most functional and effective characters in the entire story are more or less the ones who are most like the classic Silver Age characters. Dan Dreiberg, the BoringButPractical Blue Beetle knock off is a far better detective than Rorschach, and his equipment is the one that busts Rorschach out of jail and takes them to Antarctica. Likewise, Ozymandias is more or less a classic pulp Doc Savage type character, whose CharlesAtlasSuperpower is not subject to any {{Deconstruction}} at all, and is used for drama when it makes him an utterly undefeatable villain (on whom Rorschach cannot land a punch).
* TheUnfettered: The Comedian, Dr. Manhattan and Rorschach. Ozymandias.
* UnstuckInTime: Dr. Manhattan becomes briefly disoriented because of tachyons. ''"Excuse me, Rorschach. I'm informing Laurie ninety seconds ago... I-I'm sorry. It's these tachyons."''
** If you flip the two pages of the graphic novel back and forth when he says this, Manhattan is in the same position on both pages, in the same pose, saying the same thing, highlighting his non-linear perception of time.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom:
** After the Comedian's death, Rorschach approaches Veidt with the possibility of a serial killer targeting former heroes, completely unaware that Veidt killed the Comedian for unrelated reasons. A single panel shows Veidt contemplating Rorschach's suggestion, and then Veidt begins killing masks in earnest as a RedHerring.
** Rorschach again, when he leaves his journal for a tabloid to discover, including all his incriminating evidence against Veidt and his new utopia.
* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Ozymandius has a pet genetically modified lynx, Bubastis.
* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: Turns out to be the whole plot.
* ViewerFriendlyInterface: "HELLO ADRIAN HERE ARE THE FILES YOU NEED"
* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This graphic novel ostensibly takes place in America with American characters, but one character mentions "having a lock fitted". An American would say "having a lock ''installed''".
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Rorschach and Veidt.
* WhamEpisode: For comics (this is still widely considered one of the best and most influential comics ever written, and one of the best novels).
** The climax of issue #11.
* WhamLine:
** "I did it thirty-five minutes ago."
** "Can't a guy talk to, y'know, his good friend's daughter?" The wham comes from the realization that two of the words in the sentence are false.
* WhamShot: The opening pages of issue #12 are an extended one. Half the cast has died horribly. It's implied that Laurie and Osterman are the only living things in New York City.
* WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway: '''''Inverted.''''' Typically, one of the FiveManBand has mediocre abilities, yet everyone from the Minutemen and Crimebusters apply to this trope when you consider that Dr. Manhattan is a God with a StoryBreakerPower by comparison.
* WhatMeasureIsANonSuper: Deconstructed. In the series, we often find that ordinary police officers are more than capable of defeating Rorschach by going all ZergRush on him where Batman for instance is always able to defeat and escape multiple police officers and mooks in comics, likewise Dr. Malcolm Long is cut from a different and altogether more heroic cloth than the usual simplistic brand of psychotherapy typical of superhero comics.
* WhatTheHellHero: Everybody, but most pronounced in the scene where the Comedian calls out Dr. Manhattan for not doing anything to save his (the Comedian's) AsianBabyMama despite knowing exactly what would happen. Ironically, it cements Dr. Manhattan's view that they're essentially the same. But for the biggest example, see the [[YMMV/{{Watchmen}} YMMV]] page.
** This is essentially Rorschach's entire mode of operation.
* WhiteDwarfStarlet: The first Night Owl and Silk Specter prefer talking about their GloryDays.
* WhoWatchesTheWatchmen
* WhoShotJFK: It's hinted that it might have been the Comedian.
* WouldntHitAGirl: Beats up, shoots and stabs this trope.
* WorldOfBadass: Both played straight and deconstructed. The heroes are seriously screwed up people, yet surprisingly capable of kicking ass when needed.
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Several examples:
** Malcolm Long initially faces an existential crisis after being confronted with Rorschach's grim worldview and horrible life experiences. He ends up making two speeches, one questions the hollow nature of his profession and middle class life, the other reconciles him with that reality.
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"I looked at the Rorschach blot. I tried to pretend it looked like a spreading tree, shadows pooled beneath it, but it didn't. It looked more like a dead cat I once found, the fat, glistening grubs writhing blindly, squirming over each other, frantically tunneling away from the light. But even that is avoiding the real horror. The horror is this: In the end, it is simply a picture of empty meaningless blackness. We are alone. There is nothing else."''
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"In a world like this, it's all we can do, try and help each other. [[TheAntiNihilist It's all that means anything.]]"''
** Dr. Manhattan later gives a more traditional one:
--> '''Dr. Manhattan''': ''" I have walked across the surface of the sun. I have witnessed events so tiny and so fast, they could hardly be said to have occurred at all. But you, Adrian, you're just a man. The world's smartest man poses no more threat to me than does its smartest termite."''
* WrittenSoundEffect: Half averted: fight scenes are silent, but there is a wide and surprising variety of onomatopoeia for ''dialogue''.
** Such as The Comedian drinking: "''nk nk nk''".
** Rorschach eating: "''Ronch ronch ronch/Cronch cronch cronch''" (sugar cubes) or "''Schlorp... chlorp... lep...''" (raw baked beans).
** Rorschach thinking: "''Hurm...''"
** Rorschach yelling: '''''RRAAAARRL'''''
** All of those straddle the line between this and actual dialogue, being vocalized.
* YouAreTooLate: Thirty-five minutes late, to be exact.
* YouBastard: If you believe Ozymandias was right, you're okay with killing several million people and lying to the entire world to trick it into peace. If you believe Rorschach was right, you believe that Ozymandias's scheme should be revealed to the world in the name of justice, even if it means sending the world back to the brink of nuclear holocaust.
* YouCannotChangeTheFuture: Extensively discussed by Dr. Manhattan, see [[Characters/{{Watchmen}} Character page]] for details. ''Excuse us, troper, you're already reading that entry 90 seconds ago...''
* YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness: Ozymandias poisons his assistants, and congratulates them for helping create a new utopia (as they are either dead or dying), then lets their bodies be hidden by snow cover. Later, he tells the others that his assistants accidentally killed themselves. He also blows up the artists who helped create the monster.
** Big Figure has one of his mooks kill another when Rorschach ties the unlucky mook's hands to his cell door, obstructing the others from coming in to get him.
* ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld: Airships are far more common, because [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Dr. Manhattan can synthesize enough helium to make them cost-effective]] (and safer than hydrogen-filled airships would have been).

----
--> Nothing ends, Troper. Nothing ever ends.
----

to:

* SociopathicHero: Rorschach and the Comedian. Deconstructed. while it quickly becomes clear that instead of being a CaptainPatriotic, the Comedian is one of these, we just learn latter that even acting like a sociopath has its drawbacks - his brutality alienated everybody from him on the scale that he cannot form a human relationship anymore. While he clearly wants to reconcile with his daughter, he is incapable of that, at first because he is awkward in relationships and than because Laurie despises him for his attempted rape of her mother. And when he is desperate because of Ozymandias' plan, where does he go? To one of his former enemies', where he breaks down sobbing, instead of another vigilante.
* SomethingElseAlsoRises: ...that flamethrower...
** Though at least it wasn't the air-to-air missiles.
* SpannerInTheWorks: Appears to be the case, but, of course, is all part of Ozzie's plan.
** The ending has hints of a really major case maybe about to happen. See CliffHanger, above.
* SpeciesLoyalty: Ozzie's plan turns on this.
* SpreadingDisasterMapGraphic: This is used to demonstrate the damages of a nuclear attack by the Soviet Union, when Dr. Manhattan isn't there to prevent it.
* StatusQuoIsGod: There is still a Cold War despite the heroes existence in the real world.
* StealthPun:
** Fits in nicely with FridgeBrilliance: Jon, an aspiring watchmaker who was told to forgo the business due to the atomic bomb, has the accident that leads to his PhysicalGod status because his first girlfriend's '''watch''' was ''stepped on'' by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_man a fat man]].
** There's a very clever one in ''Fearful Symmetry''. The pirate-themed Rum Runner sign has two [[TheBackwardsR Rs back to back]] so they resemble a skull. It fits the symmetry theme, but there's another thing you might not have noticed unless you know Cyrillic: the sign says [[TalkLikeAPirate Yar]]![[note]]Actually, you have to know the Cyrillic ''and'' Roman lettering systems to get that; in English it's "Backwards R - "R" and in Cyrilic it's "Ya" - "Backwards Ya", since the Roman R character does not exist in Cyrillic and the character for the same sound looks like a Roman P.[[/note]]
* StopWorshippingMe: Dr. Manhattan is powerful enough to be considered divine, but resents being perceived this way. He says something like "I don't think there is a God, and if there is I don't think I'm anything like Him".
* StoryWithinAStory: ''Tales of the Black Freighter''.
* {{Stripperiffic}}: An odd LampshadeHanging, in which a character uses it as a warped justification for AttemptedRape. It's also noticeable that the costume was only very Stripperiffic by 1940 standards, as it's a very short backless gown with stockings.
** Further lampshade hanging when her daughter/successor complains about how ridiculous her own costume was. Unlampshaded when she puts the costume on for her new boyfriend and doesn't stop wearing it for the rest of the series (though there wasn't time to get a new one).
** And let's not forget Dr. Manhattan, whose progressively-diminished costume provides a Stripperific clue as to how far back in his personal timeline each of his flashback appearances lies. The fact that he's first seen buck-naked, and is only later seen in skin-tight bodysuits or Speedos, may be a bit of a joke on this trope.
* SuperheroesWearCapes: Deconstructed (like everything else) with the character of Dollar Bill. He was a former football player hired by a bank when they realized that having their own personal superhero on payroll was a great way to cash in on the masked vigilante craze. The costume was designed by the marketing department, who were going for style over practicality and thought that the cape added visual appeal. It ended up getting caught in a revolving door while he was trying to stop a robbery, at which point one of the robbers shot him point-blank in the chest.
** Nite Owl I's original costume had a cape, but when he failed to master the art of walking around ''his own house'' with it on without the cape catching on things, he got rid of it.
** This deconstruction was carried over into the CGI animated film ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' with heavy nods to ''Watchmen''.
* SuperpowerLottery: Deconstructed. Dr. Manhattan is a nigh-omnipotent, nigh-omniscient being, and the only one who has any superpower whatsoever. Yet he is so unmotivated and detached that he lets himself become a puppet of government, is one of those characters who can be manipulated very easily, and has really hard time using his own powers not just for others', but for his own good.
* SuperRegistrationAct: The Keene Act, with all that followed. Only a few refused to sign it, but it appears there's not a lot of superheroes around anymore.
* TeleportationSickness: Others besides Dr. Manhattan tend to find his teleporting them unpleasant, some rioters even suffering heart attacks when he puts them back home.
** Though Manhattan's narration points out that this was due at least partly to the shock of suddenly finding themselves back home.
* ThatManIsDead
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': "I no longer wish to look at dead things."
-->'''Rorschach''': "It was Kovacs who closed his eyes but it was Rorschach that opened them again."
* ThatWasntARequest:
-->'''Dr. Manhattan''': Pay attention. You will all return to your homes.\\
'''Protester''': Oh yeah? And what if we don't, ya big blue fruit?\\
'''Dr. Manhattan''': You misunderstand me. It was not a request.
* TherapyIsForTheWeak: Rorschach certainly thinks so, and demonstrates on his prison therapist.
* ThereAreNoTherapists: Deconstructed. Psychotherapy was new in the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII world but lack of understanding of psychological care causes Mothman's breakdown. Dr. Long (Rorschach's shrink) shows how impossible it is to understand the mind of a "hero".
* TheTokyoFireball: Only [[BigApplesauce in New York]], and it's more of a human-brain LogicBomb.
* TheyFightCrime: Deconstructed. Rorschach and Dreiberg's differences in temperament make their partnership almost impossible.
* TheyShouldHaveSentAPoet: Every part of the Mars scene.
* ThrowAwayCountry: Averted strongly. The series takes great pains to introduce us to a variety of ordinary New Yorkers with lives and personalities of their own. It then takes great pains to show all of their corpses in the aftermath.
* TitleDrop: Ozymandias gives one for the whole comic:
-->'''Ozymandias''': Even read [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK's]] intended speech? "We in this country, in this generation are, by destiny rather than choice, the watchmen on the walls of world freedom."
** The chapter titles are also title dropped with little quotations at the end of each one.
* TokenSuper: Doctor Manhattan is the TropeCodifier, winning big on the SuperpowerLottery and ending up as the only hero in the Watchmen continuity to have powers, which are [[PhysicalGod god-like]]. The rest of the Watchmen are all {{Non Powered Costumed Hero}}s.
* TooDumbToLive: The prisoners in the jail Rorschach was sent to. No matter WHAT he does to any of them, they are determined to get at him.
* TheTopicOfCancer: Doctor Manhattan is extremely distraught to discover that the radiation emitted by his physical avatar gave his friends cancer. This has actually been a ploy by Ozymandias, [[MoralEventHorizon who gave them cancer himself]].
* TotalitarianUtilitarian: Adrian Veidt.
* TrespassingToTalk: Rorscharch frequently does this, both to his friends and enemies. In one case, leaving a Right Behind You message in the victim's fridge.
* TwinThreesomeFantasy: Subverted, as Laurie is disturbed by Manhattan cloning himself in the bedroom -- and eventually enraged when she sees [[CoitusUninterruptus another duplicate still working in the lab.]]
* TwistedEchoCut: Used repeatedly, especially at scene changes between ''Tales of the Black Freighter'' and the main plot. For example, it cuts from the newsstand owner talking about how newsvendors are tough survivors, to a shipwreck survivor standing on a beach crying. Or from Nite Owl saying "It'll be like coming home," to the shipwrecked man finally arriving on the mainland. "I could be no more than twenty miles from Davidstown. I was home."
* TwoForOneShow: The pirate comic-within-a-comic tells a full story from beginning to end, and mirrors many turning points in the overall story.
* TwoScenesOneDialogue: Background conversations, or banter coming from a nearby TV, which are also relevant to the main scene. ''The Black Freighter'' also sometimes mirrors some of the smaller events happening around the newsstand where it is being read. This is a trademark of ''Watchmen''.
* UglyHeroGoodLookingVillain: Rorschach is quite homely and short, both of which are mentioned in-story at least once. Also, he smells bad, dresses scruffily and has terrible table manners. He's a NobleBigot, a rape apologist, a NietzscheWannabe ... but, then again, Rorschach [[PayEvilUntoEvil only kills dangerous criminals]]. Ozymandias, is attractive in a sort of fey, {{Bishounen}} way and WickedCultured. While Rorschach and Ozymandias are both {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s, Rorschach ''[[NeverHurtAnInnocent never]]'' hurt an innocent person throughout the whole story, whereas Ozymandias killed two million innocent people with the intention of saving billions from nuclear war. This kind of pushes Rorschach into an AntiHero while Ozymandias is more of an AntiVillain, so this mostly plays the trope straight.
** [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation Possibly]] [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zagged]] at the end. While Ozymandias may have saved the world, it may only be temporary and thus unnecessary (making Rorschach's exposure of Ozymandias' plan more of a deserved justice). If it was a true success, then maybe Rorschach's actions will instead lead to nuclear war all over again.
* UnbuiltTrope: Even though it started UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, this comic really reads, in retrospect, like a deconstruction of the very things it inspired.
** Rorschach, Dr. Manhattan, and the Comedian are all the exact kind of grim, dark anti-heroes that arose in the 90's but this is not portrayed as a positive thing at all. Rorschach and Comedian are sociopathic lunatics who are hated and feared by many and Manhattan is a fatalistic and emotionless person whose behavior causes his personal life to fall to pieces. Moore's point was that neurotic and complex human shades [[RealityEnsues would make superheroes relatable but also unstable and non-functional]] while his copycats saw it as [[DramaticallyMissingThePoint an attempt to make superheroes cool]].
** Indeed the most functional and effective characters in the entire story are more or less the ones who are most like the classic Silver Age characters. Dan Dreiberg, the BoringButPractical Blue Beetle knock off is a far better detective than Rorschach, and his equipment is the one that busts Rorschach out of jail and takes them to Antarctica. Likewise, Ozymandias is more or less a classic pulp Doc Savage type character, whose CharlesAtlasSuperpower is not subject to any {{Deconstruction}} at all, and is used for drama when it makes him an utterly undefeatable villain (on whom Rorschach cannot land a punch).
* TheUnfettered: The Comedian, Dr. Manhattan and Rorschach. Ozymandias.
* UnstuckInTime: Dr. Manhattan becomes briefly disoriented because of tachyons. ''"Excuse me, Rorschach. I'm informing Laurie ninety seconds ago... I-I'm sorry. It's these tachyons."''
** If you flip the two pages of the graphic novel back and forth when he says this, Manhattan is in the same position on both pages, in the same pose, saying the same thing, highlighting his non-linear perception of time.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom:
** After the Comedian's death, Rorschach approaches Veidt with the possibility of a serial killer targeting former heroes, completely unaware that Veidt killed the Comedian for unrelated reasons. A single panel shows Veidt contemplating Rorschach's suggestion, and then Veidt begins killing masks in earnest as a RedHerring.
** Rorschach again, when he leaves his journal for a tabloid to discover, including all his incriminating evidence against Veidt and his new utopia.
* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Ozymandius has a pet genetically modified lynx, Bubastis.
* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: Turns out to be the whole plot.
* ViewerFriendlyInterface: "HELLO ADRIAN HERE ARE THE FILES YOU NEED"
* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This graphic novel ostensibly takes place in America with American characters, but one character mentions "having a lock fitted". An American would say "having a lock ''installed''".
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Rorschach and Veidt.
* WhamEpisode: For comics (this is still widely considered one of the best and most influential comics ever written, and one of the best novels).
** The climax of issue #11.
* WhamLine:
** "I did it thirty-five minutes ago."
** "Can't a guy talk to, y'know, his good friend's daughter?" The wham comes from the realization that two of the words in the sentence are false.
* WhamShot: The opening pages of issue #12 are an extended one. Half the cast has died horribly. It's implied that Laurie and Osterman are the only living things in New York City.
* WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway: '''''Inverted.''''' Typically, one of the FiveManBand has mediocre abilities, yet everyone from the Minutemen and Crimebusters apply to this trope when you consider that Dr. Manhattan is a God with a StoryBreakerPower by comparison.
* WhatMeasureIsANonSuper: Deconstructed. In the series, we often find that ordinary police officers are more than capable of defeating Rorschach by going all ZergRush on him where Batman for instance is always able to defeat and escape multiple police officers and mooks in comics, likewise Dr. Malcolm Long is cut from a different and altogether more heroic cloth than the usual simplistic brand of psychotherapy typical of superhero comics.
* WhatTheHellHero: Everybody, but most pronounced in the scene where the Comedian calls out Dr. Manhattan for not doing anything to save his (the Comedian's) AsianBabyMama despite knowing exactly what would happen. Ironically, it cements Dr. Manhattan's view that they're essentially the same. But for the biggest example, see the [[YMMV/{{Watchmen}} YMMV]] page.
** This is essentially Rorschach's entire mode of operation.
* WhiteDwarfStarlet: The first Night Owl and Silk Specter prefer talking about their GloryDays.
* WhoWatchesTheWatchmen
* WhoShotJFK: It's hinted that it might have been the Comedian.
* WouldntHitAGirl: Beats up, shoots and stabs this trope.
* WorldOfBadass: Both played straight and deconstructed. The heroes are seriously screwed up people, yet surprisingly capable of kicking ass when needed.
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Several examples:
** Malcolm Long initially faces an existential crisis after being confronted with Rorschach's grim worldview and horrible life experiences. He ends up making two speeches, one questions the hollow nature of his profession and middle class life, the other reconciles him with that reality.
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"I looked at the Rorschach blot. I tried to pretend it looked like a spreading tree, shadows pooled beneath it, but it didn't. It looked more like a dead cat I once found, the fat, glistening grubs writhing blindly, squirming over each other, frantically tunneling away from the light. But even that is avoiding the real horror. The horror is this: In the end, it is simply a picture of empty meaningless blackness. We are alone. There is nothing else."''
--> '''Malcolm Long''': ''"In a world like this, it's all we can do, try and help each other. [[TheAntiNihilist It's all that means anything.]]"''
** Dr. Manhattan later gives a more traditional one:
--> '''Dr. Manhattan''': ''" I have walked across the surface of the sun. I have witnessed events so tiny and so fast, they could hardly be said to have occurred at all. But you, Adrian, you're just a man. The world's smartest man poses no more threat to me than does its smartest termite."''
* WrittenSoundEffect: Half averted: fight scenes are silent, but there is a wide and surprising variety of onomatopoeia for ''dialogue''.
** Such as The Comedian drinking: "''nk nk nk''".
** Rorschach eating: "''Ronch ronch ronch/Cronch cronch cronch''" (sugar cubes) or "''Schlorp... chlorp... lep...''" (raw baked beans).
** Rorschach thinking: "''Hurm...''"
** Rorschach yelling: '''''RRAAAARRL'''''
** All of those straddle the line between this and actual dialogue, being vocalized.
* YouAreTooLate: Thirty-five minutes late, to be exact.
* YouBastard: If you believe Ozymandias was right, you're okay with killing several million people and lying to the entire world to trick it into peace. If you believe Rorschach was right, you believe that Ozymandias's scheme should be revealed to the world in the name of justice, even if it means sending the world back to the brink of nuclear holocaust.
* YouCannotChangeTheFuture: Extensively discussed by Dr. Manhattan, see [[Characters/{{Watchmen}} Character page]] for details. ''Excuse us, troper, you're already reading that entry 90 seconds ago...''
* YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness: Ozymandias poisons his assistants, and congratulates them for helping create a new utopia (as they are either dead or dying), then lets their bodies be hidden by snow cover. Later, he tells the others that his assistants accidentally killed themselves. He also blows up the artists who helped create the monster.
** Big Figure has one of his mooks kill another when Rorschach ties the unlucky mook's hands to his cell door, obstructing the others from coming in to get him.
* ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld: Airships are far more common, because [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Dr. Manhattan can synthesize enough helium to make them cost-effective]] (and safer than hydrogen-filled airships would have been).

----
--> Nothing ends, Troper. Nothing ever ends.
----
that
22nd Oct '17 11:38:09 AM nombretomado
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** Chapter IX: The Darkness of Mere Being (from the book, ''Memories, Dreams, Reflections'', by CarlJung).

to:

** Chapter IX: The Darkness of Mere Being (from the book, ''Memories, Dreams, Reflections'', by CarlJung).UsefulNotes/CarlJung).
15th Oct '17 9:35:22 PM Snowy66
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Added DiffLines:

* TokenSuper: Doctor Manhattan is the TropeCodifier, winning big on the SuperpowerLottery and ending up as the only hero in the Watchmen continuity to have powers, which are [[PhysicalGod god-like]]. The rest of the Watchmen are all {{Non Powered Costumed Hero}}s.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Comicbook.Watchmen