History Comicbook / PowerPack

21st Apr '16 7:58:07 PM CASCHero
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There was a failed {{Pilot}} for television series version, but it was never aired in the US, though it did appear on overseas channels and has circulated as a bootleg among fans for years. As of now, Marvel's new owner, WaltDisneyPictures, is wondering if this kid team would be an obvious property to develop for a film.

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There was a failed {{Pilot}} for television series version, but it was never aired in the US, though it did appear on overseas channels and has circulated as a bootleg among fans for years. As of now, Marvel's new owner, WaltDisneyPictures, is wondering if this kid team would be an obvious property to develop for a film.
film. Considering they made ''Disney/BigHero6'', another obscure Marvel superhero team, into a film, there's a high chance it could happen.
15th Apr '16 9:11:00 AM ladyofthelibrary
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Added DiffLines:

* BodyguardingABadass: The Power Pack sometimes act as an unofficial bodyguard squad for Franklin Richards, one of the most powerful characters in the Marvel universe. Since while Franklin is very powerful, [[PowerIncontinence he can't control his abilities and likely will never get full control of them]], this is justified.
5th Apr '16 2:24:34 PM Roo
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* VitriolisticBestBuds:

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* VitriolisticBestBuds: VitriolicBestBuds:
5th Apr '16 2:24:11 PM Roo
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Added DiffLines:

* HoldingBackThePhlebotinum: Especially in the early parts of the original series, Katie had a tendency to get knocked out, sedated or otherwise put to sleep so that her Energizer powers wouldn't beat the bad guys in ten seconds flat.


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* VitriolisticBestBuds:
** Like most siblings, the Powers bicker and argue a lot, but they really do love each other and work well as a team.
** Special mention should go to Katie and Franklin: Especially in the early parts of the series, whenever Franklin was around Katie would turn into a little terror and they were always fighting and calling each other names... though it soon turned more good-natured, and the comics were always hinting at a possible future romance between the two.
1st Apr '16 1:47:08 PM TheLaughingFist
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* BiTheWay: Julie in more recent aged up stories.

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* BiTheWay: Julie in more recent aged up stories.Julie.
25th Mar '16 2:33:36 PM qwertyuiop[qweee
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** PureEnergy: the energy bolts that a person wielding the “energy” powers can unleash [[CaptainObvious appear to be made of this.

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** PureEnergy: the energy bolts that a person wielding the “energy” powers can unleash [[CaptainObvious appear to be made of this.]]
25th Mar '16 2:33:29 PM qwertyuiop[qweee
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** PureEnergy: the energy bolts that a person wielding the “energy” powers can unleash appear to be made of this.

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** PureEnergy: the energy bolts that a person wielding the “energy” powers can unleash [[CaptainObvious appear to be made of this.
29th Feb '16 10:32:13 AM ladyofthelibrary
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''Power Pack'' was a 1980s comic book series by Marvel Comics that starred four child superheroes. While this concept is not unusual in WesternAnimation, it was new for the Franchise/MarvelUniverse. Unlike those of TV cartoon super-kids, most of the Pack's adventures were straight superhero action, with deeper real-world themes as well, such as child abuse, guns in school, bullying, and genocide - the kids were unwilling witnesses to the mass-murder of the sewer-dwelling Morlocks. The mood was lighter than other Marvel fare, but darker than typical super-kid st* ories.

The series was about the four children of one Prof. Power, a scientist who had invented an antimatter generator. However, a horselike alien named Whitemane tried to warn him that a similar machine had blown up his homeworld. Unfortunately, "Whitey" (as the kids named him) was mortally wounded by his enemies, the alien Snarks, and couldn't prevent them from kidnapping the children's parents.

to:

''Power Pack'' was a 1980s comic book series by Marvel Comics that starred four child superheroes. While this concept is not unusual in WesternAnimation, it was new for the Franchise/MarvelUniverse. Unlike those of TV cartoon super-kids, most of the Pack's adventures were straight superhero action, with deeper real-world themes as well, such as child abuse, guns in school, bullying, and genocide - the kids were unwilling witnesses to the mass-murder of the sewer-dwelling Morlocks. The mood was lighter than other Marvel fare, but darker than typical super-kid st* ories.

stories.

The series was about the four children of one Prof. Power, a scientist who had invented an antimatter generator. However, a horselike horse-like alien named Whitemane tried to warn him that a similar machine had blown up his homeworld. Unfortunately, "Whitey" (as the kids named him) was mortally wounded by his enemies, the alien Snarks, and couldn't prevent them from kidnapping the children's parents.



Now, it appears as a regular series of mini-series in Marvel's ''ComicBook/MarvelAdventures'' imprint and it seems to have found its niche with fun stories complemented with adorable mangaesque art. Alex Power is also a member of Reed Richards's Future Foundation (as seen in the ''FF'' book) and is a regular feature of that book's supporting cast.

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Now, it appears as a regular series of mini-series in Marvel's ''ComicBook/MarvelAdventures'' imprint and it seems to have found its niche with fun stories complemented with adorable mangaesque manga-esque art. Alex Power is also a member of Reed Richards's Future Foundation (as seen in the ''FF'' book) and is a regular feature of that book's supporting cast.



* ArtShift: compare how the pack was drawn in the original series, back in the 1980's, to how they are drawn in more recent apperances (especially the all-ages series).

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* ArtShift: compare how the pack was drawn in the original series, back in the 1980's, to how they are drawn in more recent apperances appearances (especially the all-ages series).



* BodyHorror: [[spoiler:This happens to Carmody, who is transformed into a demon. This also apparently happens to Alex, though it turns out to have been a copy.]]
* BroughtDownToBadass: both times they lost their powers to the Snarks (see below), it didn't stop the kids from standing up to the giant space lizzards.

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* BodyHorror: [[spoiler:This [[spoiler: This happens to Carmody, who is transformed into a demon. This also apparently happens to Alex, though it turns out to have been a copy.]]
* BroughtDownToBadass: both Both times they lost their powers to the Snarks (see below), it didn't stop the kids from standing up to the giant space lizzards.lizards.



* CreateYourOwnVillain: [[spoiler:The Pack's ArchEnemy, Douglas Carmody aka "The Bogeyman", is already something of a villain when we first see him (planning to weaponize Dr. Power's converter technology rather than using it to provide cheap power [[StrawCharacter and calling Dr. Power a "hippie" for wanting to do any less]]), but he descends into full-blown supervillainy after the converter is destroyed, descending into madness, losing the remnants of his fortune, his marriage, and basically his whole life... which he blames the Powers for.]]

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* CreateYourOwnVillain: [[spoiler:The Pack's ArchEnemy, Douglas Carmody aka "The Bogeyman", is already something of a villain when we first see him (planning to weaponize Dr. Power's converter technology rather than using it to provide cheap power [[StrawCharacter and calling Dr. Power a "hippie" for wanting to do any less]]), but he descends into full-blown supervillainy super-villainy after the converter is destroyed, descending into madness, losing the remnants of his fortune, his marriage, and basically his whole life... which he blames the Powers for.]]



* FranchiseZombie: an in-universe example. In issue #21 of the original series, Jack and Katie get to meet their favorite author, upon which Jack asks her why she stopped writing the "Cody Davis: Space Exporer" series (which he is a fan of) in favor of writing the more childish series "Goo-Gam" (which Katie is a huge fan of). She explains that she is basically forced to do so by both her fans and editor, since Goo-Gam became far more popular with the fans than her other works, and brought in more money. By now the series takes up so much of her time that she cannot write anything else.

to:

* FranchiseZombie: an in-universe example. In issue #21 of the original series, Jack and Katie get to meet their favorite author, upon which Jack asks her why she stopped writing the "Cody Davis: Space Exporer" Explorer" series (which he is a fan of) in favor of writing the more childish series "Goo-Gam" (which Katie is a huge fan of). She explains that she is basically forced to do so by both her fans and editor, since Goo-Gam became far more popular with the fans than her other works, and brought in more money. By now the series takes up so much of her time that she cannot write anything else.



* GirlsHaveCooties: in the original series, Jack has this attittude. For example, in issue 44 Gosamyr flirts with him, which freaks Jack out. In the all-ages series, Katie has this attitude towards boys.

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* GirlsHaveCooties: in the original series, Jack has this attittude.attitude. For example, in issue 44 Gosamyr flirts with him, which freaks Jack out. In the all-ages series, Katie has this attitude towards boys.



* HowDoIShotWeb: the kids don't automatically know how to use the powers given to them (neither in the original series nor the all ages series) and have to experiment to get the hang of them. The trope comes into play again after each power switch they go through, with the occasional by-product of the new owner figuring out new ways to use the power in the process.

to:

* HowDoIShotWeb: the The kids don't automatically know how to use the powers given to them (neither in the original series nor the all ages series) and have to experiment to get the hang of them. The trope comes into play again after each power switch they go through, with the occasional by-product of the new owner figuring out new ways to use the power in the process.



* NotAllowedToGrowUp: for a comic book series, surprisingly averted in the mainstream Earth-616 continuity of the Marvel Comics. The characters all made their debute as preteens, but over the years since their own series was cancelled and they were reduced to guest roles in other comics, all four have significantly aged up to teenagers (and in Alex’ case even close to young adult). So far played straight in the all-ages miniseries, though that can easily be justified by stating that in-universe those stories are set in a period of a few months at most.

to:

* NotAllowedToGrowUp: for a comic book series, surprisingly averted in the mainstream Earth-616 continuity of the Marvel Comics. The characters all made their debute debut as preteens, but over the years since their own series was cancelled and they were reduced to guest roles in other comics, all four have significantly aged up to teenagers (and in Alex’ case even close to young adult). So far played straight in the all-ages miniseries, though that can easily be justified by stating that in-universe those stories are set in a period of a few months at most.



* PajamaCladHero: during their [[SuperheroOrigin Origin Story]] (both in the regular series and in the "power pack: day one" story of the all-ages series), the four kids are dressed in their pyjama's when not wearing their costumes since the Snarks kidnapped their parents in the middle of the night.

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* PajamaCladHero: during During their [[SuperheroOrigin Origin Story]] (both in the regular series and in the "power pack: day one" "Power Pack: Day One" story of the all-ages series), the four kids are dressed in their pyjama's pajamas when not wearing their costumes since the Snarks kidnapped their parents in the middle of the night.



* PubertySuperpower: Averted; the oldest of them was twelve [[spoiler:though the arc where Alex apparently turned into a Kymellian invoked this trope]].

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* PubertySuperpower: Averted; the oldest of them was twelve [[spoiler:though [[spoiler: though the arc where Alex apparently turned into a Kymellian invoked this trope]].



* TemporalParadox: Happens in the new all-ages series, specifically in ''Avengers & Power Pack Assemble'' #4. [[spoiler:The Pack are thrown 10 years into the future by Kang the Conqueror who goes on to defeat The Avengers and other heroes and conquer the world. The Pack meanwhile encounter none other than their future selves 10 years older. Julie realizes the paradox and asks her older self how this is even possible, who simply handwaves it away by claiming it has something to do with parallel timelines.]]

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* TemporalParadox: Happens in the new all-ages series, specifically in ''Avengers & Power Pack Assemble'' #4. [[spoiler:The [[spoiler: The Pack are thrown 10 years into the future by Kang the Conqueror who goes on to defeat The Avengers and other heroes and conquer the world. The Pack meanwhile encounter none other than their future selves 10 years older. Julie realizes the paradox and asks her older self how this is even possible, who simply handwaves it away by claiming it has something to do with parallel timelines.]]



* WouldHurtAChild: the pack's enemies hardly ever have any issues about fighting or using leathal force against a bunch of preteen kids. In the all-ages version some villians, notably Kraven The Hunter and Kang the Conqueror, try to avert this trope, claiming fighting kids is against their standards or something like that and offering the Pack a chance to bail out of this without fighting, but are quick to make an exception for Power Pack when the heroes provoke them enough.

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* WouldHurtAChild: the pack's enemies hardly ever have any issues about fighting or using leathal force against a bunch of preteen kids. In the all-ages version some villians, villains, notably Kraven The Hunter and Kang the Conqueror, try to avert this trope, claiming fighting kids is against their standards or something like that and offering the Pack a chance to bail out of this without fighting, but are quick to make an exception for Power Pack when the heroes provoke them enough.
28th Jan '16 8:54:00 AM rjd1922
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While never a major Marvel series, Power Pack lasted a surprisingly long time and had a loyal following. The series lasted for 62 issues (August, 1984-February, 1991)At one point, Franklin Richards (son of Mr. Fantastic and The Invisible Woman of the ComicBook/FantasticFour) joined them for a while under the name ''Tattletale'' (his godlike powers were at the time reduced to just telepathy, precognitive dreaming, and a ghost body). The Pack met various other heroes, including Spider-Man and Wolverine. Strangely, for a long while few people called them on being superheroes at such a young age (Katie was only ''five years old!'') or going around without adult supervision (unless you count Friday's) much less doing dangerous stuff behind their parents' backs.

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While never a major Marvel series, Power Pack lasted a surprisingly long time and had a loyal following. The series lasted for 62 issues (August, 1984-February, 1991)At 1991). At one point, Franklin Richards (son of Mr. Fantastic and The Invisible Woman of the ComicBook/FantasticFour) joined them for a while under the name ''Tattletale'' (his godlike powers were at the time reduced to just telepathy, precognitive dreaming, and a ghost body). The Pack met various other heroes, including Spider-Man and Wolverine. Strangely, for a long while few people called them on being superheroes at such a young age (Katie was only ''five years old!'') or going around without adult supervision (unless you count Friday's) much less doing dangerous stuff behind their parents' backs.
15th Jan '16 9:46:57 PM Pennyforth
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* HowDoIShotWeb: the kids don't automatically know how to use the powers given to them (neither in the original series nor the all ages series) and have to experiment to get the hang of them. The trope comes into play again after each power switch they go through.

to:

* HowDoIShotWeb: the kids don't automatically know how to use the powers given to them (neither in the original series nor the all ages series) and have to experiment to get the hang of them. The trope comes into play again after each power switch they go through.through, with the occasional by-product of the new owner figuring out new ways to use the power in the process.



* OhCrap: After one of the team power shuffles, Snark Queen Mother Maraud has a moment of this when Jack acquires the energy power, and she realizes that he's just mature enough not to accidentally lose control of it (as Katie sometimes did), but still enough of a kid that he's not going to overthink the ramifications of the power (as Alex often did)--in essence, he's fully capable of just disintegrating and/or blowing stuff up until nothing's left standing.

to:

* OhCrap: After one of the team power shuffles, Snark Queen Mother Maraud has a moment of this when Jack acquires the energy power, and she realizes that he's just mature enough not to accidentally lose control of it (as Katie sometimes did), but still enough of a kid that he's not going to overthink the ramifications of the power (as Alex often did)--in essence, he's fully capable of just disintegrating and/or blowing stuff up until nothing's left standing.standing, without putting his siblings and allies at risk from PowerIncontinence.
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