History ComicBook / TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen

20th Feb '18 6:55:12 PM Trooper924
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** The hybrids created by [[literature/TheIslandOfDoctorMoreau Doctor Moreau]] seen in Volume II deconstruct [[FunnyAnimal Funny Animals]] and PettingZooPeople by showing what combinations of humans and animals would really be like: BodyHorror, UncannyValley, BestialityIsDepraved, CarnivoreConfusion, and NightmareFuel all ensue.

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** The hybrids created by [[literature/TheIslandOfDoctorMoreau [[Literature/TheIslandOfDoctorMoreau Doctor Moreau]] seen in Volume II deconstruct [[FunnyAnimal Funny Animals]] and PettingZooPeople by showing what combinations of humans and animals would really be like: BodyHorror, UncannyValley, BestialityIsDepraved, CarnivoreConfusion, and NightmareFuel all ensue.
3rd Feb '18 8:00:44 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* Literature/{{Pollyanna}} to the same extent we use ThePollyanna trope. She's still glad even after a near rape, which she was not that oblivious in her source.

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* ** Literature/{{Pollyanna}} to the same extent we use ThePollyanna trope. She's still glad even after a near rape, which she was not that oblivious in her source.
2nd Feb '18 10:19:47 PM Homemaderat
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* LostInImitation: Moore contends that many elements from the original works he uses have been forgotten. He uses deconstruction in this series to try and return some of these elements back to characters he feel have been made LighterAndSofter in adaptations. You can see many of these and their counterpoints on the YMMV page.
2nd Feb '18 9:51:45 PM Homemaderat
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* AdaptationalBadass:
** Hyde. In the original book, Hyde is a "dwarfish" man who is sometimes comical to look at and whose personality swings between bold and timid. In the comic, he's a towering juggernaut with SuperStrength and SuperSenses as well as a powerful personality. Jekyll admits in the comic that Hyde used to be smaller than him, but that Hyde grew as that personality gained dominance. Both these changes can be somewhat justified from the original. Hyde did grow in the original novel and if Jekyll and Hyde faked the suicide and survived, the process might have continued. After the first transformation Stevenson writes: "There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably new and, from its very novelty, incredibly sweet." This could be interpreted as Hyde having somewhat different senses from an ordinary person.
** Apparently Don Quixote was this, as he became a member of the original incarnation of the League headed by Prospero, and must have been a fairly accomplished adventurer, rather than the delusional old man he was in his own novel. Though, [[UnbuiltTrope careful readers of the book]], such as Creator/VladimirNabokov have long observed that Don Quixote is not really [[BunnyEarsLawyer all that bad]] as a KnightErrant, famously pointing out that he wins more fights than he loses. Restoring a little known aspect of a long beloved character is what Moore is all about.
* AdaptationalWimp: Quatermain is imagined here is a timid, strung-out old junkie who is often ashamed of himself. Even when he regains some of his old verve, he's never quite the bold and confident adventurer he is in the original.
* AdaptationalVillainy: Quite a few characters who are HeroOfAnotherStory are presented in a decidedly darker light in the League books, with SocietyMarchesOn, ValuesDissonance and GenreDeconstruction strongly applied to these works.

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* AdaptationalBadass:
AdaptationalBadass: Several characters have gone up from how they were in their original source material. Some from specific adaptations count as well.
** Hyde. In the original book, Hyde is a "dwarfish" man who is sometimes comical to look at and whose personality swings between bold and timid. In the comic, he's a towering juggernaut with SuperStrength and SuperSenses as well as a powerful personality. Jekyll admits in the comic that Hyde used to be smaller than him, but that Hyde grew as that personality gained dominance. Both these changes can be somewhat justified based on an interpretation from the original. Hyde did grow in the original novel and if book It is mentioned Hyde grew in "stature" but that can be interpreted in literal size which could make him grow to the comics proportions or just in terms of becoming the more heartier persona. (At first Jekyll and was a hearty man, Hyde faked the suicide and survived, the process might have continued. sicker smaller man) After the first transformation Stevenson writes: "There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably new and, from its very novelty, incredibly sweet." This could be interpreted as Hyde having somewhat different senses from an ordinary person.
** Apparently Don Quixote was this, as he became a member of the original incarnation of the League headed by Prospero, and must have been a fairly accomplished adventurer, rather than the delusional old man he was in his own novel. Though, [[UnbuiltTrope careful readers of Although this interpretation was not orignated here either.his old verve, he's never quite the book]], such as Creator/VladimirNabokov have long observed that Don Quixote bold and confident adventurer he is not really [[BunnyEarsLawyer all that bad]] as a KnightErrant, famously pointing out that he wins more fights than he loses. Restoring a little known aspect of a long beloved character is what Moore is all about.
in the original.
* AdaptationalWimp: Quatermain is imagined here is a timid, strung-out old junkie who is often ashamed of himself. Even when he regains some of his old verve, he's never quite the bold and confident adventurer he is in the original.
original. It was true Quatermain became more vulnerable throught his original stories he never sunk to the levels he is here.
** [[Series/TheAvengers Emma Peel]] who was a really over the top level spy in her tv series is presented as more an unknowing pawn in her appearance. Although she may have averted this by the time 2009 came along.
* AdaptationalVillainy: Quite a few characters who are HeroOfAnotherStory are presented in a decidedly darker light in the League books, with SocietyMarchesOn, ValuesDissonance and books. As per Moore's quote in that section for GenreDeconstruction strongly applied to purposes we see elements of how these works.characters may be interpreted with SocietyMarchesOn and ValuesDissonance added to them.



** Boys Adventure Heroes from Charles Hamilton's Literature/{{Greyfriars}} School stories has the Famous Five's leader Harry Wharton becoming Big Brother with other members of the gang forming the party of Ingsoc, and Billy Bunter shown as a pathetic ManChild who also [[spoiler:rats out Mina and Allan Quatermain]]. Other adventure heroes who are shown as less than noble is Literature/TomSwift or [[WritingAroundTrademarks Tom Swyfte]] who is a racist and DirtyCoward who cares more [[ItsAllAboutMe about his own life]] than that of his team and whose inventions revolve around [[ArmsDealer developing weapons]] because he's OnlyInItForTheMoney rather than ForScience. In ''Volume III: Century'', Moore builds his climax to a prolonged TakeThat on [[spoiler:Literature/HarryPotter, showing the main character as a whiny SpoiledBrat who is also an EldritchAbomination who murdered the entire supporting cast of his series]].
* AllMythsAreTrue: Or perhaps more accurately, all ''fiction'' is true. Except there was [[Film/DrNo no doctor]].

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** Boys Adventure Heroes from Charles Hamilton's Literature/{{Greyfriars}} School stories has the Famous Five's leader Harry Wharton becoming Big Brother with other members of the gang forming the party of Ingsoc, and Billy Bunter shown as a pathetic ManChild who also [[spoiler:rats out Mina and Allan Quatermain]]. Other adventure heroes who are shown as less than noble is Literature/TomSwift or [[WritingAroundTrademarks Tom Swyfte]] who is a racist and DirtyCoward who cares more [[ItsAllAboutMe about his own life]] than that of his team and whose inventions revolve around [[ArmsDealer developing weapons]] because he's OnlyInItForTheMoney rather than ForScience. In ''Volume III: Century'', Moore builds his climax to a prolonged TakeThat on [[spoiler:Literature/HarryPotter, showing the main character as a whiny SpoiledBrat who is also an EldritchAbomination who murdered the entire supporting cast of his series]].series. In the same process name dropping some other magical school boy characters as having been monitored as well.]] In their own works these characters were generally the heroes and stars. In Moore's League they grew up to be just as villainous as those they fought.
** Nyctalope appears as a member of the French version of the League, in his own source material he was a genuine hero, but here he is among a team that were genuine villains in their sources or at the very least morally questionable.

* AllMythsAreTrue: Or perhaps more accurately, all ''fiction'' is true. Except Or is at least partially true in some cases like that there was [[Film/DrNo no doctor]].



* AuthorTract: Moore is usually respectful of the fictional characters he appropriates and is fairly faithful to their original representations. However:

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* AuthorTract: Moore Despite Moore's really impressive reading acumen on witness in this series even he is usually respectful not immune to having his combined world here clearly show off some of the fictional characters he appropriates and is fairly faithful to their original representations. However:his own beliefs.



*** His depiction of Literature/JamesBond (at least, the literary version) isn't exactly flattering either, although it is more faithful to Fleming's original depiction in comparison to his film counterpart. Book Bond isn't exactly the nicest guy around, but Moore took it UpToEleven.

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*** His depiction of Literature/JamesBond (at least, the literary version) isn't exactly flattering either, although it is more faithful to Fleming's original depiction in comparison to his film counterpart. Book Bond isn't exactly orginally displayed quite a bit of mysoginy but did soften as the nicest guy around, series went on, but here Moore took it UpToEleven.UpToEleven and kept it there.



** In ''Century: 2009'', his portrayal of Literature/HarryPotter is generally quite mean-spirited and satirical, making fun of its WorldBuilding and cast of characters with the single exception of [[spoiler:Severus Snape]], who gets a FacingTheBulletsOneLiner, and whose in-universe dismissal of Harry as [[spoiler:the Antichrist]]; an EntitledBastard celebrity coasting off better wizards is Moore's own view of the character and its series and influence, an opinion made particularly transparent when he has [[spoiler:God appear and destroy him - in the form of Mary Poppins, self-proclaimed guardian of the world's children and their imaginations]].

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** In ''Century: 2009'', his portrayal of Literature/HarryPotter is generally quite mean-spirited and satirical, making fun of its WorldBuilding and cast of characters with the single exception of [[spoiler:Severus Snape]], who gets a FacingTheBulletsOneLiner, and whose in-universe dismissal of Harry as [[spoiler:the Antichrist]]; an EntitledBastard celebrity coasting off better wizards is Moore's own view of the character and its series and influence, an opinion made particularly transparent when he has [[spoiler:God appear and destroy him - in the form of Mary Poppins, self-proclaimed guardian of the world's children and their imaginations]]. Moore elaborated that even with this he doesn't think ALL of modern literature is as bleak but it is also clear this is an attitude he shares on other modern works that contributed to how he wrote the League world in 2009.



'''[[spoiler:Mary Poppins]]:''' I have a great many responsibilities. Foremost among these, however, is my concern for the children. I am concerned regarding their wellbeing, and the healthy development of their imaginations. I am concerned regarding their behaviour... And I'm afraid, young man, that I don't care for you at all.\\

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'''[[spoiler:Mary Poppins]]:''' I have a great many responsibilities. Foremost among these, however, is my concern for the children. I am concerned regarding their wellbeing, and the healthy development of their imaginations. I am concerned regarding their behaviour...behavior... And I'm afraid, young man, that I don't care for you at all.\\



* BroadStrokes: Moore takes this approach to much of the fiction he incorporates, which is understandable because of how nigh-impossible it would be to fit so much fiction into one world without it.

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* BroadStrokes: Moore takes this approach to much of the fiction he incorporates, which is understandable because of how nigh-impossible it would be to fit so much fiction into one world without it.needing to adjust somethings.



* Literature/{{Pollyanna}} to the same extent we use ThePollyanna trope. She's still glad even after a near rape, which she was not that oblivious in her source.



** [[invoked]]The Moonchild's teenage {{Wangst}} and obsession with fame and coping with celebrity is likewise an exaggeration of the source character's flaws, in addition to a pastiche of millennial culture in general. [[spoiler: Sure, Harry Potter could whine a lot, but he never resorted to a school shooting.]]

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** In the Nemo spin-off Literature/TomSwift can also be called this. In his original stories he was fairly up-to-date for his age. Whether he'd have grown up to be that callous for now questionable activities is a bit of an exageration.
** [[invoked]]The Moonchild's teenage {{Wangst}} and obsession with fame and coping with celebrity is likewise an exaggeration of the source character's flaws, in addition to a pastiche of millennial culture in general. [[spoiler: Sure, Harry Potter could whine a lot, but he never resorted to a school shooting.shooting to solve his problems.]]



* {{Chickification}}: Mina is a lot more vulnerable in ''Century: 1969'' than we've seen her before. Explained as a result of the strain of being immortal finally starting to catch up with her.
* CluelessAesop: Several reviewers and commentators (such as some members of the discussion panel [[http://mindlessones.com/2012/06/26/league-of-extraordinary-gentlemen-century-2009-thoughts/#more-25723 here]]) argued that Moore's argument that twenty-first century culture in ''Century: 2009'' is decadent and inferior compared to the culture produced by the generations that came before is weakened by Moore's obvious lack of familiarity with twenty-first century fiction and culture. The issue contained fewer overall references to contemporary fiction than previous volumes had, and several of these references were themselves questionable, inaccurate or somewhat outdated. For these critics, this had the effect less of the intended searing indictment of modern culture and more of Moore coming across as a bit of a GrumpyOldMan complaining about things he barely understood.

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* {{Chickification}}: Mina is a lot more vulnerable in ''Century: 1969'' than we've seen her before. Explained as a result of the strain of being immortal finally starting to catch up with her.
her. It's true she was a DamselInDistress in her source material, but that situation wasn't entirely on her own fault.
* CluelessAesop: Several reviewers and commentators (such as some members of the discussion panel [[http://mindlessones.com/2012/06/26/league-of-extraordinary-gentlemen-century-2009-thoughts/#more-25723 here]]) argued that Moore's argument that twenty-first century culture in ''Century: 2009'' is decadent and inferior compared to the culture produced by the generations that came before is weakened by Moore's obvious lack of familiarity with twenty-first century fiction and culture. The issue contained fewer overall references to contemporary fiction than previous volumes had, had[[note]]There is an argument that there are limitations to mediums such as films or acted out theatre that do not exist for the literature and written down versions. Some would argue it should be the modern fiction to the previous that should be compared for being on the same level. Moore's versions seem to generally think fiction as a whole has declined not really calling this point to attention.[[/note]], and several of these references were themselves questionable, inaccurate or somewhat outdated. For these critics, this had the effect less of the intended searing indictment of modern culture and more of Moore coming across as a bit of a GrumpyOldMan complaining about things he barely understood.



** The Antichrist is a combination of Aleister Crowley's Moon Child, Harry Enfield's Kevin the Teenager, [[Manga/{{AKIRA}} Tetsuo]], and [[spoiler:Harry Potter]].

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** Janni Nemo is a combination of Low-Dive Jenny from ''Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera'' and a child of Captain Nemo from ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''. In Leagues we don't really learn that much of Nemo's family other than that they had existed, so it's fair to count Janni here in that sense.
** The Antichrist is a combination of Aleister Crowley's Moon Child, Child and [[spoiler:Harry Potter]]. He also spouts a line from Harry Enfield's Kevin the Teenager, [[Manga/{{AKIRA}} Tetsuo]], and [[spoiler:Harry Potter]].Teenager.



** As time as gone on the comic has engulfed all of fiction, not just written books or written books based on other mediums. This has been met with both fandom rejoicing and major criticism on Moore's world building.

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** As time as gone on the comic has engulfed all of fiction, not just written books or written books based on other mediums. For characters that have both a literature and other incarnation it can vary on the character. Moore defied the changing of Nemo from an Indian prince to an Englishmen staying true to the book. On the same token Jack Carter is clearly modeled more after the ''Film/GetCarter'' than his literary version. This has been met with both fandom rejoicing and major criticism on Moore's world building.



* CreatorProvincialism : Despite having a canon comprised of all recorded literature, the League is very England centered, with the focus on British popular culture by and large. Captain Nemo, from Creator/JulesVerne is a TokenMinority in both senses as a character not originating from English literature. Mina Harker can also be singled out here, as her author wrote Dracula while living in the UK, but he himself was born in Ireland to Irish parents. As a result some would not consider him an English author either.



** Moore typically foregrounds the subtext of a given story, emphasizing the obscure and little known aspects, which is why the characters that he [[InsistentTerminology steals]] from famous works of literature are not consistent from how they are popularly known. In a lot of cases this takes the form of the character in the comic being more engulfed by their own worst habits. Most of which are taken up to high levels for the sake of deconstruction. This is particularly emphasized in the Victorian League:

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** Moore typically foregrounds the subtext of a given story, emphasizing the obscure and little known aspects, aspects that have been forgotten or often adapted out, which is why the characters that he [[InsistentTerminology steals]] from famous works of literature are not consistent from how they are popularly known. In a lot of cases this takes the form of the character in the comic being more engulfed by their own worst habits. Most of which are taken up to high levels for the sake of deconstruction. This is particularly emphasized in the Victorian League:



*** Likewise, Allan Quatermain, rather than the stereotypical GreatWhiteHunter, is initially TheLoad of the League because of his crippling opium addiction, rather than the sure hero of popular imagination and he constantly relapses into his old behavior. Perhaps the biggest stretch is Captain Nemo or Prince Dakkar of Bundelkhand working with UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire, when in Creator/JulesVerne's stories he is a NGOSuperpower anti-colonialist rebel. Though the idea of an old imperialist and a colonialist rebel on the same team is a nice touch.

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*** Likewise, Allan Quatermain, rather than the stereotypical GreatWhiteHunter, is initially TheLoad of the League because of his crippling opium addiction, rather than the sure hero of popular imagination and he constantly relapses into his old behavior.
***
Perhaps the biggest stretch is Captain Nemo or Prince Dakkar of Bundelkhand working with UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire, when in Creator/JulesVerne's stories he is a NGOSuperpower anti-colonialist rebel. Though the idea of an old imperialist and a colonialist rebel on the same team is a nice touch.



** Literature/{{Pollyanna}}'s ceaseless happiness and cheeriness is taken to extremes when, after being raped by Griffin, she is still happy and smiling.

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** Literature/{{Pollyanna}}'s ceaseless happiness and cheeriness is taken to extremes when, after being nearly raped by Griffin, she is still happy and smiling.



* FromNobodyToNightmare: The Famous Five from Greyfriars school. All of them became involved with spy organizations. [[spoiler:Harry Wharton became Big Brother, Bob Cherry became Harry Lime (who's also [[Franchise/JamesBond M]] and [[Series/TheAvengers Mother]]), and it's implied that Emma Knight's father designed [[Series/KnightRider super spy cars]] and masterminded [[Series/ThePrisoner The Island]]]].

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* FromNobodyToNightmare: The Famous Five from Greyfriars school. school were in their days decent for their school notoriety but afterwards would have probably been rich nobodies at best. All of them the ones we see here became involved with spy organizations. [[spoiler:Harry Wharton became Big Brother, Bob Cherry became Harry Lime (who's also [[Franchise/JamesBond M]] and [[Series/TheAvengers Mother]]), and it's implied that Johnny Bull was Emma Knight's father who designed [[Series/KnightRider super spy cars]] and masterminded [[Series/ThePrisoner The Island]]]].



* InNameOnly: TheMovie. The comic book is a Victorian era CrisisCrossover, whereas the movie is an AlternateHistory {{Steampunk}} sci-fi thriller whose characters just happen to be lifted from books. Movie!League makes Quartermain the leader/hero instead of Mina, as well as adding Dorian Gray and Tom Sawyer (who only are suspected to have appeared in pictures in the books), replacing PsychoForHire Hawley Griffin with an invisible GentlemanThief, and making Mina a vampire. Whether it was this that tanked the movie from the start or was the best decision the film made, well that today even ten years later appears to be a cause for debate.



* LostInImitation: This is one of the key themes of the comic from direct WordOfGod. To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut, likewise how character archetypes who are originally villainous in the Victorian era later came to be seen as heroic, while other character archetypes who were heroes are constantly given AdaptationalHeroism by having their questionable parts AdaptedOut:
** The comic is one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous, and morally ambiguous Nemo, eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero.
** Allan Quatermain in his original from started as the GreatWhiteHunter but became more weak and vulnerable over the course of his stories. Something that was not as well to follow in his adaptations and later inspirations who took him as the model for the AdventureArchaeologist. In this comic Moore takes this to CharacterExaggeration with Quatermain as a barely functional addict who keeps falling off the wagon.
** With Dr. Jekyll he {{Lampshaded}} how a character who was originally villainous would become the inspiration for the far more anti-heroic Hulk, by retro-fitting the latter character to his precursor. What was percieved as strange and monstrous later became acceptable and safe, mostly by being watered down in subsequent adaptations. Moore based his version of Hyde on the growth interpretation of one line in the original story. (The alternate being health)
** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Movie Bond was indeed made LighterAndSofter than book!Bond[[note]]Fleming himself started watering down Bond in the book series at it went on[[/note]] and the character's initial popularity owed greatly to the misogyny and sexism of TheFifties.
** Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s".

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* LostInImitation: This is one of the key themes of the comic from direct WordOfGod. To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut, likewise how character archetypes who are originally villainous in the Victorian era later came to be seen as heroic, while other character archetypes who were heroes are constantly given AdaptationalHeroism by having their questionable parts AdaptedOut:
** The comic is one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous, and morally ambiguous Nemo, eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero.
** Allan Quatermain in his original from started starts off as the GreatWhiteHunter but became more weak and vulnerable over the course of his stories. Something that was not as well to follow in his adaptations and later inspirations who took him as the model this for the AdventureArchaeologist. In this comic Moore takes this to CharacterExaggeration with Quatermain as a barely functional addict who keeps falling off the wagon.
** With Dr. Jekyll he {{Lampshaded}} how a character who was originally villainous would become the inspiration for the far more anti-heroic Hulk, by retro-fitting the latter character to his precursor. What was percieved as strange
League and monstrous later became acceptable and safe, mostly by being watered down in subsequent adaptations. Moore based his version of Hyde on the growth interpretation of one line in the original story. (The alternate being health)
** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Movie Bond was indeed made LighterAndSofter than book!Bond[[note]]Fleming himself started watering down Bond in the book series at it went on[[/note]] and the character's initial popularity owed greatly to the misogyny and sexism of TheFifties.
** Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well
sometimes slips back into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s". it.



** As a result Moore appears to construct that each generation slowly longs back to how it was before brining in the continual decline of fiction Moore believes in today.



** Mina Murray is celebrated and commemorated for her part as the protagonist of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' rather than the Count, Van Helsing and other elements which have supplied the cottage industry of vampire films, who by contrast are barely referred to and alluded to. Likewise, unlike more modern neo-victorian takes like ''Series/PennyDreadful'' or the film adaptation, Moore makes it clear that Mina received no vampire powers from her encounter with Dracula, which is true to Bram Stoker's novel, which never portrayed a clear correlation between vampire bites and vampirism and likewise Moore portrays [[spoiler:a much grizzlier look at what a bite from a being with teeth of a vampire bat would look like]].

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** Mina Murray is celebrated and commemorated for her part as the protagonist of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' rather than the Count, Van Helsing and other elements which have supplied the cottage industry of vampire films, who by contrast are barely referred to and alluded to. Likewise, unlike more modern neo-victorian takes like ''Series/PennyDreadful'' or the film adaptation, Moore makes it clear that Mina received no vampire did not retain any powers from her encounter with Dracula, which is true to Bram Stoker's novel, which never portrayed Dracula's bites after his death. In the original source she wasn't turned into a clear correlation between full vampire bites and vampirism and likewise was cured completly of it by Dracula's death. Moore also portrays [[spoiler:a much grizzlier look at what a bite from a being with teeth of a vampire bat would look like]].



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive, and indeed references are made to generally obscure cult films like ''Film/{{Performance}}'' or ''Film/GetCarter'' and the main cultural symbol of TheOughties that Moore focuses on is [[Literature/HarryPotter You-Know-Who]].

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive, and indeed references are made to generally obscure cult films like ''Film/{{Performance}}'' or ''Film/GetCarter'' ''Film/GetCarter''[[note]]Which did have a literary version but this version paid more attention to the film version[[/note]] and the main cultural symbol of TheOughties that Moore focuses on is [[Literature/HarryPotter You-Know-Who]]. As a result it can be jarring, regardless how any of us feel about the individual characters, that a lot of popular literary characters aren't referenced at all.
1st Feb '18 8:24:26 AM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* LighterAndSofter: Perhaps surprisingly, this is the case with some of the adapted works, such as Ingsoc from ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' not being as big or lasting as long as they claimed in the novel, and FrankensteinsMonster getting a happier ending.
31st Jan '18 8:13:55 PM Homemaderat
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* RelatedInTheAdaptation: Given the nature of the series this has cropped up for some characters from wholly seperate works now being related. Low-dive Jenny of ''Theatre/TheThreePennyOpera'' is now the daughter of Captain Nemo. Emma Night of ''Series/TheAvengers'' is the daughter of Johny Bull of Greyfriars. Also, Jack Kerouac's characters Doctor Sax and [[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] are the descendants of Fu Manchu and Prof. James Moriarty respectively.

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* RelatedInTheAdaptation: Given the nature of the series this has cropped up for some characters from wholly seperate works now being related. Low-dive Jenny of ''Theatre/TheThreePennyOpera'' is now the daughter of Captain Nemo. Emma Night Peel of ''Series/TheAvengers'' is the daughter of Johny Johnny Bull of Greyfriars. Also, Jack Kerouac's characters Doctor Sax and [[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] are the descendants of Fu Manchu and Prof. James Moriarty respectively.



* {{Utopia:}} The [[Literature/{{Utopia}} original one is mentioned in the ''Alkmanack''.

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* {{Utopia:}} {{Utopia}}: The [[Literature/{{Utopia}} ''Literature/{{Utopia}}'' original one is mentioned in the ''Alkmanack''.
31st Jan '18 6:35:49 PM Homemaderat
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* LegacyCharacter: With a bit of GenerationXerox: Macheath from ''Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera'' is apparently descended from the Macheath of ''The Beggar's Opera''. Also, Jack Kerouac's characters Doctor Sax and [[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] are the descendants of Fu Manchu and Prof. James Moriarty respectively. Its also revealed in ''Century'' that [[spoiler:James Bond]] is a title assigned to different agents of British Intelligence, with two specific agents refered to as J3 and J6 looking an awful lot like [[spoiler:Roger Moore and Creator/DanielCraig]].

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* LegacyCharacter: With a bit of GenerationXerox: Macheath from ''Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera'' is apparently descended from the Macheath of ''The Beggar's Opera''. Also, Jack Kerouac's characters Doctor Sax and [[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] are the descendants of Fu Manchu and Prof. James Moriarty respectively. Its also revealed in ''Century'' that [[spoiler:James Bond]] is a title assigned to different agents of British Intelligence, with two specific agents refered to as J3 and J6 looking an awful lot like [[spoiler:Roger Moore and Creator/DanielCraig]].


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* RelatedInTheAdaptation: Given the nature of the series this has cropped up for some characters from wholly seperate works now being related. Low-dive Jenny of ''Theatre/TheThreePennyOpera'' is now the daughter of Captain Nemo. Emma Night of ''Series/TheAvengers'' is the daughter of Johny Bull of Greyfriars. Also, Jack Kerouac's characters Doctor Sax and [[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] are the descendants of Fu Manchu and Prof. James Moriarty respectively.
31st Jan '18 10:50:17 AM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* HumanoidAbomination: The true form of the Antichrist ([[spoiler:Harry Potter]]) in ''Century'', which resembles a giant, bald man, covered in eyeballs. Dracula is also implied to have been this, in line with the original novel.

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* HumanoidAbomination: Several of these. The true form of the Antichrist ([[spoiler:Harry Potter]]) in ''Century'', which resembles a giant, bald man, covered in eyeballs.eyeballs is definitely one. Dracula is also implied to have been this, in line with the original novel. The Galley-Wag is a benevolent version of this trope.


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** Queen Ayesha and Adenoid Hynkel also team up in ''Nemo: Roses of Berlin''.
** See also the entry for Legion of Doom above.
31st Jan '18 10:42:45 AM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* StarfishAliens: The Martians.
** StarfishRobots: The Martins' tripod vehicles.


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* SubStory: Much of the first two volumes takes place in the ''Nautilus''.


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* {{Utopia:}} The [[Literature/{{Utopia}} original one is mentioned in the ''Alkmanack''.
29th Jan '18 5:51:34 AM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* StupidJetpackHitler: The Nazi-run Berlin Metropolis is full of advanced technology and machinery.


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* SuperTeam: Arguably, every version of the League is this, but the most traditional one is the Seven Stars, a team of superheroes from TheSixties.
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