History ComicBook / PlasticMan

18th Apr '18 12:40:23 AM narm00
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For starters, Plastic Man (or "Plas" for short) was created by another company, Quality Comics, in 1941. He was the star character of ''Police Comics'' #1-102 (August, 1941-October, 1950). And also gained his own title, ''Plastic Man'', which lasted for 52 issues (1943 to February, 1955). While among the longest running characters of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, Plas was then pretty much forgotten. Quality Comics ceased operations in 1956, selling most, if not all of its properties to DC Comics. The new owners continued a few of Quality's ongoing series, most notably ComicBook/{{Blackhawk}}, but had no interest in reviving defunct series. The character was next revived in ''Plastic Man'' vol. 2 #1 (December, 1966), though the Plastic Man of this series was said to be a look-alike son of the original.

to:

For starters, Plastic Man (or "Plas" for short) was created by another company, Quality Comics, in 1941. He was the star character of ''Police Comics'' #1-102 (August, 1941-October, 1950). And 1950), and also gained his own title, ''Plastic Man'', which lasted for 52 issues (1943 to February, 1955). While among the longest running characters of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, Plas was then pretty much forgotten. Quality Comics ceased operations in 1956, selling most, if not all of its properties to DC Comics. The new owners continued a few of Quality's ongoing series, most notably ComicBook/{{Blackhawk}}, but had no interest in reviving defunct series. The character was next revived in ''Plastic Man'' vol. 2 #1 (December, (November-December, 1966), though the Plastic Man of this series was said to be a look-alike son of the original.
original. This series ran for 10 issues, then got resurrected a decade later with ''Plastic Man'' vol. 2 #11 (February-March, 1976) for another 10-issue run.



In his origin story, Plastic Man was Patrick "Eel" O'Brian, a gangster. One night while robbing a chemical company, things went awry as O'Brian was shot and fell into a vat of unknown chemicals; the rest of his gang abandoned him as they made their getaway. He managed to escape and was taken in by a monastery, where he recovered. The betrayal by his own men and the kindness of the monks inspired him to change his life, and he started using his newfound [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting powers]] (he can change into anything he can imagine, but always retaining the same colors) to battle crime as "Plastic Man". He kept his SecretIdentity as O'Brian in order to infiltrate the underworld, but eventually joined the FBI.

to:

In his origin story, Plastic Man was Patrick "Eel" O'Brian, a gangster. One night while robbing a chemical company, things went awry as O'Brian was shot and fell into a vat of unknown chemicals; the rest of his gang abandoned him as they made their getaway. He managed to escape and was taken in by a monastery, where he recovered. The betrayal by his own men and the kindness of the monks inspired him to change his life, and he started using his newfound [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting powers]] (he can change into anything he can imagine, but always retaining retains the same colors) to battle crime as "Plastic Man". He kept his SecretIdentity as O'Brian in order to infiltrate the underworld, but eventually joined the FBI.



ComicBook/PostCrisis, they changed Plastic Man's origin to make him DarkerAndEdgier...ish. Kinda. "Dimmer and Slightly More Pointed," more like.

to:

ComicBook/PostCrisis, they a Creator/PhilFoglio miniseries changed Plastic Man's origin to make him DarkerAndEdgier...ish. Kinda. "Dimmer and Slightly More Pointed," more like.



As of ''ComicBook/DarkNightsMetal'', Plas is a member of SuperTeam ''ComicBook/TheTerrifics'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.

He's set to receive another retelling of his origin in a 2018 miniseries.

to:

Kyle Baker wrote and illustrated an unashamedly cartoony series from 2004 to 2006, mocking the ultra-seriousness of modern superhero comics, which was much-loved by critics and ignored by everyone else.

As of ''ComicBook/DarkNightsMetal'', Plas is became a member of SuperTeam ''ComicBook/TheTerrifics'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.

He's set to receive another retelling of his origin in a 2018 miniseries.
miniseries by Creator/GailSimone.



* Kyle Baker wrote and illustrated an unashamedly cartoony series from 2004 to 2006, which was much-loved by critics and ignored by everyone else. Bakerís series returned to the origin of the Jack Cole stories and mocked the ultra-seriousness of modern superhero comics.



* BumblingSidekick: Woozy Winks
* CanonDiscontinuity: The 1988-89 4-issue mini-series by Phil Foglio took place during the early part of the modern age of heroes[[note]]Woozy Winks mentions [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan Reaganomics]][[/note]], and the timeline in ''Zero Hour'' #0 seem to confirm it. But this was mostly ignored and his Golden Age debut reestablished.

to:

* BumblingSidekick: Woozy Winks
Winks.
* CanonDiscontinuity: The 1988-89 4-issue mini-series by Phil Foglio Creator/PhilFoglio took place during the early part of the modern age of heroes[[note]]Woozy Winks mentions [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan Reaganomics]][[/note]], and the timeline in ''Zero Hour'' ''ComicBook/ZeroHour'' #0 seem seems to confirm it. But this was mostly ignored and his Golden Age debut reestablished.



* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Due to the jokesy nature of most of his appearances, people forget that not only can he go toe-to-toe with most of the other big names in the DCU without much difficulty, but he's also a trained CIA operative and survived dismemberment for thousands of years.

to:

* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Due to the jokesy nature of most of his appearances, people forget that not only can he go toe-to-toe with most of the other big names in the DCU without much difficulty, but he's also a trained CIA FBI operative and survived dismemberment for thousands of years.



* LethalJokeCharacter: Plas is very silly character with a silly power, that can be absolutely deadly in the wrong hands.

to:

* LethalJokeCharacter: Plas is a very silly character with a an equally silly power, power... that can be absolutely deadly in the wrong hands.



* ObfuscatingStupidity: He is usually portrayed as being ''genuinely'' a bit dopey. During "World War III," Creator/GrantMorrison's final story arc for ''ComicBook/{{JLA}}'', however, he reveals that, thanks to his longtime friendship with a CListFodder hero named the Red Bee, he knows just about everything there is to know about "apian management." Since an alien [[EvilOverlord Evil Overlady]] named the Queen Bee is taking over New York City, and all the big-name heroes are busy on the Moon, Plastic Man ends up masterminding their victory. [[ComicBook/NewGods Big Barda]] even mentions how out of character this is for him, remarking, "This almost seems like a plan." To which he responds (while disguised as a big clown), "I only act dumb, sister."

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: He is usually portrayed as being ''genuinely'' a bit dopey. During "World War III," Creator/GrantMorrison's final story arc for ''ComicBook/{{JLA}}'', ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'', however, he reveals that, thanks to his longtime friendship with a CListFodder hero named the Red Bee, he knows just about everything there is to know about "apian management." Since an alien [[EvilOverlord Evil Overlady]] named the Queen Bee is taking over New York City, and all the big-name heroes are busy on the Moon, Plastic Man ends up masterminding their victory. [[ComicBook/NewGods Big Barda]] even mentions how out of character this is for him, remarking, "This almost seems like a plan." To which he responds (while disguised as a big clown), "I only act dumb, sister."



** Later, DC semi-inverted this by saying that the Cole-style adventures were how Plas perceived himself and them due to the effects of the chemicals that gave him his powers; to everyone else, he was a kook in a world of (supposedly) sane people... [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and]] SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker.

to:

** Later, DC semi-inverted this by saying that the Cole-style adventures were how Plas perceived himself and them due to the effects of the chemicals that gave him his powers; to everyone else, he was a kook in a world of (supposedly) sane people... [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and]] SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker.ComicBook/TheJoker.



* OverprotectiveDad: Was this to Edwina in the 2004-2006 series of comics, and could be argued to be this for Offspring in most other continuties.

to:

* OverprotectiveDad: Was this to Edwina in the 2004-2006 series of comics, series, and could be argued to be this for Offspring in most other continuties.
15th Apr '18 6:25:03 PM nombretomado
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* ObfuscatingStupidity: He is usually portrayed as being ''genuinely'' a bit dopey. During "World War III," Creator/GrantMorrison's final story arc for ''{{JLA}}'', however, he reveals that, thanks to his longtime friendship with a CListFodder hero named the Red Bee, he knows just about everything there is to know about "apian management." Since an alien [[EvilOverlord Evil Overlady]] named the Queen Bee is taking over New York City, and all the big-name heroes are busy on the Moon, Plastic Man ends up masterminding their victory. [[ComicBook/NewGods Big Barda]] even mentions how out of character this is for him, remarking, "This almost seems like a plan." To which he responds (while disguised as a big clown), "I only act dumb, sister."

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: He is usually portrayed as being ''genuinely'' a bit dopey. During "World War III," Creator/GrantMorrison's final story arc for ''{{JLA}}'', ''ComicBook/{{JLA}}'', however, he reveals that, thanks to his longtime friendship with a CListFodder hero named the Red Bee, he knows just about everything there is to know about "apian management." Since an alien [[EvilOverlord Evil Overlady]] named the Queen Bee is taking over New York City, and all the big-name heroes are busy on the Moon, Plastic Man ends up masterminding their victory. [[ComicBook/NewGods Big Barda]] even mentions how out of character this is for him, remarking, "This almost seems like a plan." To which he responds (while disguised as a big clown), "I only act dumb, sister."
20th Mar '18 12:54:03 AM narm00
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For starters, Plastic Man (or "Plas" for short) was created by another company, Quality Comics, in 1941. He was the star character of ''Police Comics'' #1-102 (August, 1941-October, 1950). And also gained his own title, ''Plastic Man'' which lasted for 52 issues (1943 to February, 1955). While among the longest running characters of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, Plas was then pretty much forgotten. Quality Comics ceased operations in 1956, selling most, if not all of its properties to DC Comics. The new owners continued a few of Quality's ongoing series, most notably ComicBook/{{Blackhawk}}, but had no interest in reviving defunct series. The character was next revived in ''Plastic Man'' vol. 2 #1 (December, 1966), though the Plastic Man of this series was said to be a look-alike son of the original.

to:

For starters, Plastic Man (or "Plas" for short) was created by another company, Quality Comics, in 1941. He was the star character of ''Police Comics'' #1-102 (August, 1941-October, 1950). And also gained his own title, ''Plastic Man'' Man'', which lasted for 52 issues (1943 to February, 1955). While among the longest running characters of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, Plas was then pretty much forgotten. Quality Comics ceased operations in 1956, selling most, if not all of its properties to DC Comics. The new owners continued a few of Quality's ongoing series, most notably ComicBook/{{Blackhawk}}, but had no interest in reviving defunct series. The character was next revived in ''Plastic Man'' vol. 2 #1 (December, 1966), though the Plastic Man of this series was said to be a look-alike son of the original.



Plas will become a member of a SuperTeam series ''ComicBook/TheTerrifics'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.

to:

As of ''ComicBook/DarkNightsMetal'', Plas will become is a member of a SuperTeam series ''ComicBook/TheTerrifics'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.
''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.

He's set to receive another retelling of his origin in a 2018 miniseries.



* CanonDiscontinuity: The 1988-89 4-issue mini-series by Phil Foglio took place during the early part of the modern age of heroes[[note]]Woozy Winks mentions [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan Reaganomics]][[/note]], and the timeline in ''Zero Hour'' #0 seem to confirm it. But this was mostly ignored and reestablished his Golden Age debut.

to:

* CanonDiscontinuity: The 1988-89 4-issue mini-series by Phil Foglio took place during the early part of the modern age of heroes[[note]]Woozy Winks mentions [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan Reaganomics]][[/note]], and the timeline in ''Zero Hour'' #0 seem to confirm it. But this was mostly ignored and reestablished his Golden Age debut.debut reestablished.
6th Mar '18 2:15:59 AM jormis29
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Plas will become a member of a SuperTeam series ''[[http://www.cbr.com/phantom-girl-plastic-man-the-terrifics/ The Terrifics]]'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.

to:

Plas will become a member of a SuperTeam series ''[[http://www.cbr.com/phantom-girl-plastic-man-the-terrifics/ The Terrifics]]'', ''ComicBook/TheTerrifics'', an AlternateCompanyEquivalent of Marvel's ''ComicBook/FantasticFour''.
11th Jan '18 7:48:41 PM Aquillion
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* FunPersonified

to:

* FunPersonifiedFunPersonified: Initially he was more of TheComicallySerious, but recent versions have gone for this as befits his powers - even in his DarkerAndEdgier reboots, he's usually the most lighthearted member of any team he's on.
20th Nov '17 10:48:00 AM WolfThunder
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* More recently, Plastic Man has been appearing often in the animated version of ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold The Brave and the Bold]]''. In this version, Plas was a member of Kite-Man's gang, and it was Batman who caused him to fall in the chemicals (by accident) and then took it upon himself to reform the former criminal (who is shown as still having a hard-to-resist compulsion to steal). Woozy is back as his sidekick, and Plas has a new girlfriend, Ramona, a redhead with a "New York" accent and an abusive attitude. Oh, and they have a baby too. He has proven an EnsembleDarkHorse in a series ''full'' of them.

to:

* More recently, * Plastic Man has been appearing appeared often in the animated version of ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold The Brave and the Bold]]''. In this version, Plas was a member of Kite-Man's gang, and it was Batman who caused him to fall in the chemicals (by accident) and then took it upon himself to reform the former criminal (who is shown as still having a hard-to-resist compulsion to steal). Woozy is back as his sidekick, and Plas has a new girlfriend, Ramona, a redhead with a "New York" accent and an abusive attitude. Oh, and they have a baby too. He has proven an EnsembleDarkHorse in a series ''full'' of them.
15th Aug '17 1:11:17 AM FuzzyBarbarian
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In this new version, Plastic Man was never rehabilitated by monks, and briefly considered suicide in the first issue because he considered himself no longer human, until he decided to become a hero instead. Woozy, meanwhile, was now a former mental patient who was quite content in his comfortable padded cell before he got booted out thanks to "something called 'Reaganomics.'" While it was slightly more mature, it was mature the way ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'' was more mature than ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''.

Later portrayals would restore the old origin and have Plastic Man join the Justice League, where he proved his mettle.

Kyle Baker wrote and illustrated an unashamedly cartoony series from 2004 to 2006, which was much-loved by critics and ignored by everyone else. Bakerís series returned to the origin of the Jack Cole stories and mocked the ultra-seriousness of modern superhero comics.

Bruce Timm has said that he wanted to use Plas in ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' Unlimited, but couldn't due to just one of the many copyright issues that surrounded the show. He does get a few mentions in an episode called "The Greatest Story Never Told."

He also starred in a [[http://andyupdates.blogspot.com/2010/02/thanks-john-k.html pilot]] for a series on Creator/CartoonNetwork. Made in 2006, it will finally get off the ground as a series of shorts for the network's WesternAnimation/DCNation block. Much earlier, he had his own cartoon show called ''The Plastic Man Cartoon Comedy Hour'' by Ruby-Spear Production. It ran from 1979-1981 and featured live-action segments between animated shorts. These shorts included Plastic Man cartoons but also ComicStrip/{{Marmaduke}}, ComicStrip/{{Heathcliff}}, and others.

More recently, Plastic Man has been appearing often in the animated version of ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold The Brave and the Bold]]''. In this version, Plas was a member of Kite-Man's gang, and it was Batman who caused him to fall in the chemicals (by accident) and then took it upon himself to reform the former criminal (who is shown as still having a hard-to-resist compulsion to steal). Woozy is back as his sidekick, and Plas has a new girlfriend, Ramona, a redhead with a "New York" accent and an abusive attitude. Oh, and they have a baby too. He has proven an EnsembleDarkHorse in a series ''full'' of them. He had appearances on ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' as well. He shows up late in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' to help fight the Injustice League around the world. He is among the heroes that the League considers for membership, and Flash mentions that Plastic Man has an extensive criminal record, but he does eventually join the League.

Evan Dorkin wrote and Stephan Destefano illustrated a Plastic Man feature to run in ComicBook/WednesdayComics in case any of the other strips were unable to keep up with the deadline; while not making it into the serialized issues, the single page produced is included in the collected book.

to:

In this new version, Plastic Man was never rehabilitated by monks, and briefly considered suicide in the first issue because he considered himself no longer human, until he decided to become a hero instead. Woozy, meanwhile, was now a former mental patient who was quite content in his comfortable padded cell before he got booted out thanks to "something called 'Reaganomics.'" While it was slightly more mature, it was mature the way ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'' was more mature than ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''.

''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''. Later portrayals would restore the old origin and have Plastic Man join the Justice League, where he proved his mettle.

Kyle Baker wrote and illustrated an unashamedly cartoony series from 2004 to 2006, which was much-loved by critics and ignored by everyone else. Bakerís series returned to the origin of the Jack Cole stories and mocked the ultra-seriousness of modern superhero comics.

Bruce Timm has said that he wanted to use Plas in ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' Unlimited, but couldn't due to just one of the many copyright issues that surrounded the show. He does get a few mentions in an episode called "The Greatest Story Never Told."

He also starred in a [[http://andyupdates.blogspot.com/2010/02/thanks-john-k.html pilot]] for a series on Creator/CartoonNetwork. Made in 2006, it will finally get off the ground as a series of shorts for the network's WesternAnimation/DCNation block. Much earlier, he had his own cartoon show called ''The Plastic Man Cartoon Comedy Hour'' by Ruby-Spear Production. It ran from 1979-1981 and featured live-action segments between animated shorts. These shorts included Plastic Man cartoons but also ComicStrip/{{Marmaduke}}, ComicStrip/{{Heathcliff}}, and others.

More recently, Plastic Man has been appearing often in the animated version of ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold The Brave and the Bold]]''. In this version, Plas was a member of Kite-Man's gang, and it was Batman who caused him to fall in the chemicals (by accident) and then took it upon himself to reform the former criminal (who is shown as still having a hard-to-resist compulsion to steal). Woozy is back as his sidekick, and Plas has a new girlfriend, Ramona, a redhead with a "New York" accent and an abusive attitude. Oh, and they have a baby too. He has proven an EnsembleDarkHorse in a series ''full'' of them. He had appearances on ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' as well. He shows up late in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' to help fight the Injustice League around the world. He is among the heroes that the League considers for membership, and Flash mentions that Plastic Man has an extensive criminal record, but he does eventually join the League.

Evan Dorkin wrote and Stephan Destefano illustrated a Plastic Man feature to run in ComicBook/WednesdayComics in case any of the other strips were unable to keep up with the deadline; while not making it into the serialized issues, the single page produced is included in the collected book.
mettle.


Added DiffLines:

Evan Dorkin wrote and Stephan Destefano illustrated a Plastic Man feature to run in ComicBook/WednesdayComics in case any of the other strips were unable to keep up with the deadline; while not making it into the serialized issues, the single page produced is included in the collected book.


!!Plastic Man in other media:
* Kyle Baker wrote and illustrated an unashamedly cartoony series from 2004 to 2006, which was much-loved by critics and ignored by everyone else. Bakerís series returned to the origin of the Jack Cole stories and mocked the ultra-seriousness of modern superhero comics.
* Bruce Timm has said that he wanted to use Plas in ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' Unlimited, but couldn't due to just one of the many copyright issues that surrounded the show. He does get a few mentions in an episode called "The Greatest Story Never Told."
* He also starred in a [[http://andyupdates.blogspot.com/2010/02/thanks-john-k.html pilot]] for a series on Creator/CartoonNetwork. Made in 2006, it will finally get off the ground as a series of shorts for the network's WesternAnimation/DCNation block. Much earlier, he had his own cartoon show called ''The Plastic Man Cartoon Comedy Hour'' by Ruby-Spear Production. It ran from 1979-1981 and featured live-action segments between animated shorts. These shorts included Plastic Man cartoons but also ComicStrip/{{Marmaduke}}, ComicStrip/{{Heathcliff}}, and others.
* More recently, Plastic Man has been appearing often in the animated version of ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold The Brave and the Bold]]''. In this version, Plas was a member of Kite-Man's gang, and it was Batman who caused him to fall in the chemicals (by accident) and then took it upon himself to reform the former criminal (who is shown as still having a hard-to-resist compulsion to steal). Woozy is back as his sidekick, and Plas has a new girlfriend, Ramona, a redhead with a "New York" accent and an abusive attitude. Oh, and they have a baby too. He has proven an EnsembleDarkHorse in a series ''full'' of them.
* He had appearances on ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' as well.
* He shows up late in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' to help fight the Injustice League around the world. He is among the heroes that the League considers for membership, and Flash mentions that Plastic Man has an extensive criminal record, but he does eventually join the League.
2nd Aug '17 3:20:33 PM stuthehistoryguy
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* TranquilFury/OOCIsSeriousBusiness: His reaction when he finds out that Batman is the mastermind behind [[Comicbook/RasAlGhul Ra's Al-Ghul's]] plans to take down the Justice League in the "Tower of Babel" arc.

to:

* TranquilFury/OOCIsSeriousBusiness: TranquilFury / OOCIsSeriousBusiness: His reaction when he finds out that Batman is the mastermind behind [[Comicbook/RasAlGhul Ra's Al-Ghul's]] plans to take down the Justice League in the "Tower of Babel" arc.
2nd Aug '17 3:19:59 PM stuthehistoryguy
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Added DiffLines:

* TranquilFury/OOCIsSeriousBusiness: His reaction when he finds out that Batman is the mastermind behind [[Comicbook/RasAlGhul Ra's Al-Ghul's]] plans to take down the Justice League in the "Tower of Babel" arc.
-->"Get him out of here."
30th Jul '17 12:09:30 PM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

** In ''ComicBook/Injustice2'', Batman states that Plas is their secret weapon against R'as al Ghul.
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