History ComicBook / Planetary

24th Feb '16 7:03:18 PM karlofflugosi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BadassCrew: Though Planetary and the Four definitely have their {{badass}} moments, the ''real'' standout is the Secret Society, a team of adventurers who were almost entirely killed in the line of duty in 1945. The team's roster is essentially an all-star lineup of early 20th century TwoFistedTales, including obvious {{Captain Ersatz}}es of Franchise/DocSavage, Franchise/{{Tarzan}}, Franchise/FuManchu, Franchise/TheGreenHornet, Franchise/JamesBond, Literature/{{Biggles}} and Literature/TomSwift.

to:

* BadassCrew: Though Planetary and the Four definitely have their {{badass}} moments, the ''real'' standout is the Secret Society, a team of adventurers who were almost entirely killed in the line of duty in 1945. The team's roster is essentially an all-star lineup of early 20th century TwoFistedTales, including obvious {{Captain Ersatz}}es of Franchise/DocSavage, Franchise/{{Tarzan}}, Franchise/FuManchu, Franchise/TheGreenHornet, Franchise/JamesBond, Literature/{{Biggles}} Operator 5, G-8 and Literature/TomSwift.
25th Dec '15 6:50:33 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The series is essentially Ellis' exploration of popular culture, and the "real-world" ramifications of many of the more far-out concepts that could be found within a century's worth of SpeculativeFiction, comic books and popular culture, as seen through the distorting-mirror lens of the Wildstorm Universe. As such, as well as the alternate versions of the Four, an entire back history is composed linking the pulp fiction heroes of [[TheRoaringTwenties the 1920s]] and [[TheGreatDepression 1930s]] (including versions of Franchise/DocSavage and Radio/TheShadow) with TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks and, eventually, TheModernAgeOfComicBooks, with tangents into [[TheFifties 1950s]] sci-fi movies, [[TheSixties 1960s]] spy movies, Japanese monster movies, the VertigoComics of the [[TheEighties 1980s]] (including versions of Comicbook/TheSandman and [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]]) and countless more besides. In fact, pretty much the only appearing characters who ''aren't'' based in some way on existing characters are the main characters themselves (except for a special issue which featured different versions of ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', and a ''[[TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen League of Extraordinary Gentlemen]]'' homage which, wittily, used the ''actual'' SherlockHolmes, {{Dracula}}, FrankensteinsMonster, and so on).

to:

The series is essentially Ellis' exploration of popular culture, and the "real-world" ramifications of many of the more far-out concepts that could be found within a century's worth of SpeculativeFiction, comic books and popular culture, as seen through the distorting-mirror lens of the Wildstorm Universe. As such, as well as the alternate versions of the Four, an entire back history is composed linking the pulp fiction heroes of [[TheRoaringTwenties the 1920s]] and [[TheGreatDepression 1930s]] (including versions of Franchise/DocSavage and Radio/TheShadow) with TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks and, eventually, TheModernAgeOfComicBooks, with tangents into [[TheFifties 1950s]] sci-fi movies, [[TheSixties 1960s]] spy movies, Japanese monster movies, the VertigoComics of the [[TheEighties 1980s]] (including versions of Comicbook/TheSandman and [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]]) and countless more besides. In fact, pretty much the only appearing characters who ''aren't'' based in some way on existing characters are the main characters themselves (except for a special issue which featured different versions of ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', and a ''[[TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen League of Extraordinary Gentlemen]]'' homage which, wittily, used the ''actual'' SherlockHolmes, {{Dracula}}, FrankensteinsMonster, and so on).



* {{Metafiction}}: In additional to all its other themes, you can read ''Planetary'' as a metacommentary on 20th century North American comics, in which the superhero genre eclipsed all other genres (crime, horror, spy, western, pulp sci-fi etc.) at the start of the SilverAge with the release of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. See [[http://www.comicsalliance.com/2010/07/14/absolute-planetary-review/ this review]].

to:

* {{Metafiction}}: In additional to all its other themes, you can read ''Planetary'' as a metacommentary on 20th century North American comics, in which the superhero genre eclipsed all other genres (crime, horror, spy, western, pulp sci-fi etc.) at the start of the SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} with the release of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. See [[http://www.comicsalliance.com/2010/07/14/absolute-planetary-review/ this review]].
23rd Nov '15 2:20:09 PM FF32
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AffectionateParody: A lot, with special mention going to "To Be In England, In The Summertime," an only ''slightly'' over-the-top recreation of a Delano-era ''Hellblazer'' story.

to:

* AffectionateParody: A lot, with special mention going to "To Be In England, In The Summertime," an only ''slightly'' over-the-top recreation of a Delano-era ''Hellblazer'' ''ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}}'' story.
26th Sep '15 6:36:18 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In addition to the main series, there were three crossover one-shots: ''Planetary[=/=]ComicBook/TheAuthority: Ruling the World'' (2000), ''Planetary[=/=]{{JLA}}: Terra Occulta'' (2002), and ''Planetary[=/=]Franchise/{{Batman}}: Night on Earth''. (Alternate universes were involved for the two DCUniverse crossovers.)

to:

In addition to the main series, there were three crossover one-shots: ''Planetary[=/=]ComicBook/TheAuthority: Ruling the World'' (2000), ''Planetary[=/=]{{JLA}}: ''Planetary[=/=][[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]: Terra Occulta'' (2002), and ''Planetary[=/=]Franchise/{{Batman}}: Night on Earth''. (Alternate universes were involved for the two DCUniverse crossovers.)



* AlternateUniverseReedRichardsIsAwesome: In the {{Elseworlds}} ''{{JLA}}'' crossover "Terra Occulta", Planetary have massively altered society by making super-technology publicly available, unlike in the main Planetary timeline where it's all been hidden away.
** Of course, Terra Occulta Planetary kept an iron grip on their tech, and main Planetary eventually released the Four's entire database.

to:

* AlternateUniverseReedRichardsIsAwesome: In the {{Elseworlds}} ''{{JLA}}'' ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' crossover "Terra Occulta", Planetary have massively altered society by making super-technology publicly available, unlike in the main Planetary timeline where it's all been hidden away.
** Of course, Terra Occulta Planetary kept an iron grip on their tech, and main Planetary
away.[[note]]Planetary do eventually released start making world-altering changes in the Four's entire database.main series -- in the last two issues, when it no longer matters whether StatusQuoIsGod.[[/note]]



* CombatPragmatist: Elijah Snow isn't hesitant to [[GroinAttack kick someone in the unmentionables]], or to use his cold power to simply freeze an opponent solid.
** Or do BOTH at the same time, resulting in an opponent's crotch region smashed off their body entirely -- as Dracula found out first-hand. And that was when Elijah was still a kid. If anything, he's gotten more ruthless with age.
* ContinuitySnarl: Early on there were multiple references to events in ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'' and even a crossover. But as the ''Planetary'' storyline continued to develop, cross-references ceased and even world-shaking events in ''The Authority'' were never referenced. And don't even ''try'' to reconcile it with other Wildstorm series, particularly since they eventually became an AfterTheEnd setting, while Planetary actually had a HappyEnding.
** It's probably safe to say Ellis WildStorm is its own thing which branches off when the team contacts Elijah.

to:

* CombatPragmatist: Elijah Snow isn't hesitant to [[GroinAttack kick someone in the unmentionables]], or to use his cold power to simply freeze an opponent solid.
**
solid. Or do BOTH both at the same time, resulting in an opponent's crotch region smashed off their body entirely -- as Dracula found out first-hand. And that was when Elijah was still a kid. If anything, he's gotten more ruthless with age.
* ContinuitySnarl: Early on there were multiple references to events in ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'' and even a crossover. But as the ''Planetary'' storyline continued to develop, cross-references ceased and even world-shaking events in ''The Authority'' were never referenced. And don't even ''try'' to reconcile it with other Wildstorm series, particularly since they eventually became an AfterTheEnd setting, while Planetary actually had a HappyEnding.
** It's probably safe to say Ellis WildStorm is its own thing which branches off when
HappyEnding (which itself involved potentially world-changing events that were never reflected elsewhere in the team contacts Elijah.Wildstorm 'verse).



* {{Decompressed Comic}}: Notable because Ellis was one of the first to do it in major Western comics.

to:

* {{Decompressed Comic}}: DecompressedComic: Notable because Ellis was one of the first to do it in major Western comics.



** This doubles as a reference to a similar idea in [[PhilipJoseFarmer Philip José Farmer's]] novel ''Tarzan Alive''.



* InformedAbility: We never actually see Randall Dowling's reputed MindVirus power in action. Most likely because [[StoryBreakerPower it would make him literally impossible to fight.]]



* {{Karmic Death}}: [[spoiler:Dowling and Kim]] in the climactic showdown.

to:

* {{Karmic Death}}: KarmicDeath: [[spoiler:Dowling and Kim]] in the climactic showdown.showdown.
* KickTheDog: The revelation that the Four slaughtered the entire population of a parallel earth so that they "had somewhere to store their weapons". With their abilities, they could just as easily have accessed an ''uninhabited'' parallel.



** Ends up being something of an InformedAbility since we never actually see it used. Most likely because [[StoryBreakerPower it would make him literally impossible to fight.]]



* ShoutOut: In the final issue, it's mentioned that the Planetary's job has now become a "rescue mission". Those same words were used in the final volume of ''Comicbook/TheInvisibles'' to describe how the eponymous group's jop description has changed. Both series end with the protagonists getting past a simplistic black-and-white conflict, and trying to save the whole humanity instead.

to:

* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
** The veiled hint about Lord Blackstock's early love life doubles as a reference to a similar idea in Creator/PhilipJoseFarmer's novel ''Tarzan Alive''.
**
In the final issue, it's mentioned that the Planetary's job has now become a "rescue mission". Those same words were used in the final volume of ''Comicbook/TheInvisibles'' to describe how the eponymous group's jop job description has changed. Both series end with the protagonists getting past a simplistic black-and-white conflict, and trying to save the whole humanity instead.



** Which is also a KickTheDog moment; they could just as easily have accessed an ''uninhabited'' one. (But then they wouldn't have been able to test out all those weapons before putting them in long-term storage.)
26th Sep '15 5:48:41 PM Canondorf
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Of course, Terra Occulta Planetary kept an iron grip on their tech, and main Planetary eventually released the Four's entire database.


Added DiffLines:

** It's probably safe to say Ellis WildStorm is its own thing which branches off when the team contacts Elijah.
16th Jul '15 10:40:16 PM shrikelet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ReedRichardsIsUseless: Deconstructed; the Four are the evil Mirror Universe equivalent of the Fantastic Four, and they want to hoard all their glories and advances for themselves. As William Leather tells Elijah, "We are adventurers, my crewmates and I, on the human adventure. And you all can't come along." By the end of the series, [[spoiler:Elijah finally gets to avert this. He takes back Dowling's database and uses it to makes the world a better place. The ending can also be seen as deconstructing why this is so often an EnforcedTrope. The issue after Reed Richard stops being useless, ''the series ends'', because it becomes much harder to tell interesting stories]].

to:

* ReedRichardsIsUseless: Deconstructed; the Four are the evil Mirror Universe equivalent of the Fantastic Four, and they want to hoard all their glories and advances for themselves. As William Leather tells Elijah, "We are adventurers, my crewmates and I, on the human adventure. And you all can't all come along." By the end of the series, [[spoiler:Elijah finally gets to avert this. He takes back Dowling's database and uses it to makes the world a better place. The ending can also be seen as deconstructing why this is so often an EnforcedTrope. The issue after Reed Richard stops being useless, ''the series ends'', because it becomes much harder to tell interesting stories]].
16th Jul '15 6:21:42 PM shrikelet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LegacyCharacter: Again, Jakita Wagner.

to:

* LegacyCharacter: Again, Jakita Wagner.Bret Leather is the second Dead Ranger.
18th Jun '15 4:28:40 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In a flashback in the first issue, a quantum computer creates an imaginary Earth with a set of JusticeLeague analogues. Ellis even asked Cassaday to draw them as such. Other instances are The Four (of [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel's]] ComicBook/FantasticFour) and a technological take on Captain Marvel (Creator/DCComics).

to:

** In a flashback in the first issue, a quantum computer creates an imaginary Earth with a set of JusticeLeague Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}} analogues. Ellis even asked Cassaday to draw them as such. Other instances are The Four (of [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel's]] ComicBook/FantasticFour) and a technological take on Captain Marvel (Creator/DCComics).



* {{Crossover}}: Two with DCComics, both via alternate universes. In "Night on Earth", the Planetary team pursue an antagonist who keeps flipping them into alternate universes, where they meet various versions of Franchise/{{Batman}}. "Terra Occulta" is set entirely in an alternate universe that contains both a version of Planetary and a version of the JusticeLeagueOfAmerica.

to:

* {{Crossover}}: Two with DCComics, both via alternate universes. In "Night on Earth", the Planetary team pursue an antagonist who keeps flipping them into alternate universes, where they meet various versions of Franchise/{{Batman}}. "Terra Occulta" is set entirely in an alternate universe that contains both a version of Planetary and a version of the JusticeLeagueOfAmerica.Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica.
25th May '15 6:21:09 PM Eagal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BlackBestFriend: A rare totally platonic example between Jakita and Ambrose. There's no romantic tension from either side (he's happily married with a daughter, and Jakita is insinuated to have a [[EthicalSlut pretty healthy sex life]]) but assorted flashbacks show that Jakita considered him her best friend, with perhaps only Elijah being closer to her, and he more as a father figure.
9th May '15 3:01:39 AM aoicor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WhamEpisode: Issue #12. Elijah Snow's amnesia has finally been cured, and we find out that he [[spoiler:founded]] the Planetary, that [[spoiler:he himself]] is the Fourth Man, and that [[spoiler:it was the Four who put those memory blocks in his head]]. And now he's gonna take them down!

to:

* WhamEpisode: Issue #12. Elijah Snow's amnesia has finally been cured, and we find out that [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:founded]] the Planetary, founded Planetary]], that [[spoiler:he himself]] is the Fourth Man, and that [[spoiler:it was the Four who put those memory blocks in his head]]. And now he's gonna take them down!
This list shows the last 10 events of 92. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ComicBook.Planetary