History ComicBook / Miracleman

31st May '16 12:47:54 PM Rubber_Lotus
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* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: Discussed in-universe; after Miracleman has taken over the world, he allows the tapes of his "fake" life in Gargunza's para-reality chamber to be freely circulated as entertainment. Many of his worshipers look for allegories and symbolism in every second of these childish stories, which Miracleman reacts to with mild amusement.
31st May '16 12:44:07 PM Rubber_Lotus
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** The final issue of course is a parody of CrystalSpiresAndToga utopia [[spoiler:portraying that such a world can amount to mere EthicalHedonism and a false paradise without any real authenticity and feeling. It's also much harder to resist than any dystopian reality since opponents would come across as either Luddites or regressive and reactionary people]].

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** The final issue of course is a parody of CrystalSpiresAndToga CrystalSpiresAndTogas utopia [[spoiler:portraying that such a world can amount to mere EthicalHedonism and a false paradise without any real authenticity and feeling. It's also much harder to resist than any dystopian reality since opponents would come across as either Luddites or regressive and reactionary people]].


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* PutTheirHeadsTogether: What [[spoiler:Miracleman]] does to [[spoiler:two of Dr. Gargunza's lackeys as soon as he can transform again]].
31st May '16 1:12:28 AM Arawn999
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With the collapse of Eclipse Comics, the rights to the series fell into legal limbo, made worse with [[{{Spawn}} Todd McFarlane]] buying up ownership of Eclipse Comics assets when the company went down. [=McFarlane=] drew much controversy in his desire to incorporate Miracleman into the Spawn universe and holding usage of the character and the chance to finish his story as blackmail material to force Creator/NeilGaiman (who, thanks to Alan Moore, had partial legal ownership claim to the character) to give up his long-standing legal fight over ownership of popular ''Spawn'' character Angela, along with claims to royalties that were being withheld by Todd. This remained the tenuous status quo for a few years, until it was revealed that the real rights were ''still'' held by Mick Anglo, who, due to the vagaries of the British copyright system, had never really signed away his rights to the characters at all - thus the deal with Alan Moore for usage of the character for Warrior and Eclipse Comics had been invalid all along. This allowed, ironically, MarvelComics to cut a deal to buy the rights to the entire franchise from Anglo (as well as the scripts to the 80s comic series, as the artwork has to be renegotiated since Gaiman still owned the rights to the Miracleman scripts).

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With the collapse of Eclipse Comics, the rights to the series fell into legal limbo, made worse with [[{{Spawn}} [[ComicBook/{{Spawn}} Todd McFarlane]] buying up ownership of Eclipse Comics assets when the company went down. [=McFarlane=] drew much controversy in his desire to incorporate Miracleman into the Spawn universe and holding usage of the character and the chance to finish his story as blackmail material to force Creator/NeilGaiman (who, thanks to Alan Moore, had partial legal ownership claim to the character) to give up his long-standing legal fight over ownership of popular ''Spawn'' character Angela, along with claims to royalties that were being withheld by Todd. This remained the tenuous status quo for a few years, until it was revealed that the real rights were ''still'' held by Mick Anglo, who, due to the vagaries of the British copyright system, had never really signed away his rights to the characters at all - thus the deal with Alan Moore for usage of the character for Warrior and Eclipse Comics had been invalid all along. This allowed, ironically, MarvelComics to cut a deal to buy the rights to the entire franchise from Anglo (as well as the scripts to the 80s comic series, as the artwork has to be renegotiated since Gaiman still owned the rights to the Miracleman scripts).






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* RetGone: Todd [=McFarlane=]'s version of Miracleman, the Mother of Existence, who played a significant role in ''ComicBook/{{Spawn}}'' for several years, was completely removed from his comics' continuity following the revelation that his claims of ownership were invalid.
27th May '16 2:02:06 AM JulianLapostat
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* WhatTheRomansHaveDoneForUs: [[spoiler:After taking over the world in the finale, the Miracles unleash a Golden Age of world peace, an end to crime, an end to money, health care, superpowers for ordinary people so that they can become like the Gods they admire, and they begin making inroads in raising the dead, it's a utopia under a benevolent kindly dictator, and almost nobody wants to go back to the bad old days]].
26th May '16 10:18:23 PM Rubber_Lotus
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* GeniusBonus: Both the Moore and Gaiman runs are filled with references to obscure books, films, and music.



* MadScientist: Dr. Gargunza, in both the '50s comics and the Creator/AlanMoore version.

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* LowerDeckEpisode: The beginning of Neil Gaiman's run is filled with these.
* MadScientist: Dr. Gargunza, in both the '50s comics and the Creator/AlanMoore version.
9th Mar '16 7:44:53 AM JulianLapostat
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* AlternateUniverse: It was LikeRealityUnlessNoted until [[spoiler:the final two issues of Alan Moore's stories bid a sad farewell to the status quo. Neil Gaiman's story takes place in TheUnmasquedWorld]].


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* TimeSkip: Neil Gaiman's run skipped ahead of the mid-80s in which Moore's run was finished. ''The Silver Age'' takes an even bigger TimeSkip going forward nearly twenty years after Moore's last issue.
8th Mar '16 2:44:56 PM moloch
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* TheVerse: Intended by editor Dez Skinn to be part of a "Warrior Universe", which it shared with Moore and Leach's ''Warpsmiths'' stories, Skinn's own ''Big Ben'' series and an early, short-lived Creator/GrantMorrison series called ''The Liberators''.
4th Mar '16 2:50:31 AM LondonPurple
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* ComicBookFantasyCasting: Miraclewoman is based Marilyn Monroe, while Miracleman is Paul Newman (which can be easier to see when he is Mike Moran).
27th Feb '16 11:41:06 PM JulianLapostat
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* BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:At the end of the Olympus Arc, the Miracle Family discovers technology to bring people back from the dead. Neil Gaiman's story introduces us to a newly revived Creator/AndyWarhol who has ADayInTheLimelight. Dr. Gargunza is also revived briefly but there are several copies of him, because in his case he doesn't quite adjust to the new Miracle world and can't leave his MadScientist days, and his rampant homophobia, behind. Evelyn Cream is also back, and lastly Young Miracleman]].



* BewareTheSuperman

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* BewareTheSupermanBewareTheSuperman: "He is the lightning...He is the madness!"



* CrapsaccharineWorld: [[spoiler: The "Age of Miracles" as portrayed in Moore's final issue and in Neil Gaiman's run. It's a perfect world but there is just something ''off'' about it, mostly because it's cold, vapid and built on authoritarian power]].



* {{Deconstruction}}: Moore developed a lot of the themes of ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' first in his run of ''Miracleman'' and indeed the former was described by him as the last word in his interest in superhero deconstructions, which properly began with this series. In ''Miracleman'' he tackles the conflict between boring civilian identity and the superhero identity, the wider social effect superheroes can have on the world and the AscendedFridgeHorror of a superhero-supervillain dust-up, likewise the BlueAndOrangeMorality that develops from the mere fact of having superpowers.

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* {{Deconstruction}}: {{Deconstruction}}:
**
Moore developed a lot of the themes of ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' first in his run of ''Miracleman'' and indeed the former was described by him as the last word in his interest in superhero deconstructions, which properly began with this series. In ''Miracleman'' he tackles the conflict between boring civilian identity and the superhero identity, the wider social effect superheroes can have on the world and the AscendedFridgeHorror of a superhero-supervillain dust-up, likewise the BlueAndOrangeMorality that develops from the mere fact of having superpowers.
** The final issue of course is a parody of CrystalSpiresAndToga utopia [[spoiler:portraying that such a world can amount to mere EthicalHedonism and a false paradise without any real authenticity and feeling. It's also much harder to resist than any dystopian reality since opponents would come across as either Luddites or regressive and reactionary people]].
** Young Miracleman[=/=]Dicky Dauntless also explores the Captain America [[spoiler:caught in time warp arc. He's still mentally a teenager of the Fifties and the newly changed world of the Miracles is deeply strange and upsetting, and he's not able to adjust the shock, and Miracleman and Miraclewoman are not willing to help him adjust]].



* {{Gorn}}. [[http://afewidlemusings.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/mm15-20-21.jpg Behold]].

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* {{Gorn}}. [[http://afewidlemusings.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/mm15-20-21.jpg Behold]]. In Neil Gaiman's run, [[spoiler:Creator/StanleyKubrick, who really did reside in England during TheEighties, made a documentary about the aftermath.]]



* NothingIsTheSameAnymore: [[spoiler:Neil Gaiman's stories deal with how people react to a totally different and changed world, where people come back from the dead, where consciousness is not really tied to one's body. Spies who spent their lives in duplicity can no longer fit into a new reality and instead are coralled to a fake city of spies where they can live out their fantasies of importance. Young Miracleman then gets revived and since he was a teenager when he died, the newly changed reality is a huge shock]].



* SuperFamilyTeam

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* SuperFamilyTeamSuperFamilyTeam: Totally deconstructed. Like a real family, there is the BlackSheep and DysfunctionJunction, and plain weirdness.
27th Feb '16 11:20:44 PM JulianLapostat
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* YourCheatingHeart: [[spoiler:After being estranged from Liz, Miracleman gradually engages in a very public affair with Miraclewoman.]]

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* YourCheatingHeart: [[spoiler:After being estranged from Liz, Miracleman gradually engages in a very public affair with Miraclewoman.]] At this point Miracleman no longer sees himself as Mike Moran and when he comes to Liz, he more or less says ImAManICantHelpIt and that Liz's values are outmoded. Liz tells him to GetOut]].
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