History ComicBook / DisneyDucksComicUniverse

5th May '16 8:06:21 AM Morgenthaler
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** This is the conclusion that Donald comes to at the end of ''The Duck Who Never Was'', after wishing that he was never born and having a genie (Who happens to live in an urn instead of the typical vase) he met in the Duckburg Museum grant said wish. After Donald runs off and leaves the museum however the Genie's voice is seen emanating from the urn in which he lives, proving that it really did happen. This is partially revisited in the later story ''Treasury of Croesus''. When Donald, along with his uncle and nephews, once again visits the museum he see's the same urn from the previous story and is then the only one to notice the lid of the urn being lifted up by a hand from inside the urn, which looks to be in greeting to Donald.

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** This is the conclusion that Donald comes to at the end of ''The Duck Who Never Was'', after wishing that he was never born and having a genie (Who happens to live in an urn instead of the typical vase) he met in the Duckburg Museum grant said wish. After Donald runs off and leaves the museum however the Genie's voice is seen emanating from the urn in which he lives, proving that [[OrWasItADream it really did happen.happen]]. This is partially revisited in the later story ''Treasury of Croesus''. When Donald, along with his uncle and nephews, once again visits the museum he see's the same urn from the previous story and is then the only one to notice the lid of the urn being lifted up by a hand from inside the urn, which looks to be in greeting to Donald.
5th May '16 8:05:31 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Badass}}: ''Don't. Fuck. With [=McDuck=].'' Sometimes Donald Duck, too.
5th May '16 7:56:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* AllJustADream: There's an Italian comic where Donald takes a nap on a bed in Gyro Gearloose's workplace, but accidentally activates a dream device by releasing a nightmare potion. The rest of the comic features freaky scenes such as [[DirtyCop the Beagle Boys running the police force]] and pursuing Donald, Uncle Scrooge dying when he activates his Money Bin's self-destruct before turning into a [[AttackOfThe50FootWhatever giant coin-monster]], and Little Helper becoming a robotic MadScientist by switching places with Gyro. At the end Donald wakes up back in Gyro's workplace and realizes it was all a dream.

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* AllJustADream: AllJustADream:
**
There's an Italian comic where Donald takes a nap on a bed in Gyro Gearloose's workplace, but accidentally activates a dream device by releasing a nightmare potion. The rest of the comic features freaky scenes such as [[DirtyCop the Beagle Boys running the police force]] and pursuing Donald, Uncle Scrooge dying when he activates his Money Bin's self-destruct before turning into a [[AttackOfThe50FootWhatever giant coin-monster]], and Little Helper becoming a robotic MadScientist by switching places with Gyro. At the end Donald wakes up back in Gyro's workplace and realizes it was all a dream.
5th May '16 7:35:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* DoubleStandardViolenceChildOnAdult:
** In the classic comics (that is to say, by Creator/CarlBarks), before the kids became Junior Woodchucks, they were ''extremely'' naughty, mischievous brats, and Donald would smack, whip, and paddle their asses ''quite'' often, and it was not only played for laughs, it was strongly implied that they were getting their ''just desserts''. This was phased out once they became Junior Woodchucks and started becoming more and more proactive, wise, mature do-gooders, almost to the point of [[MarySue sueishness]], especially in the DonRosa stories.
** One particularly {{egregious}} story revolved around a child psychologist selling Donald on the idea that beating the kids up was evil, and that he had been stifling their creativity and should let them do as they please; Huey, Dewey and Louie abuse the situation to extreme levels, and act like whimsical, irresponsible brats. Once Donald catches on, he invites said psychologist at home for dinner and a chat, and, while he pompously lectures Donald, the kids ''blow fireworks under his armchair''. His clothes singed, his face a mask of fury, he leaps at the kids, ready to beat the crap out of them, while Donald looks on, a smug grin on his face.
29th Apr '16 12:45:29 PM Ace1225
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** Also shown to be the case at the conclusion to Barks' "The Money Stairs''. Dealing with Donald and Scrooge competing to see whether there are some things that Scrooge's money can't accomplish it ends with Donald waking up and telling his nephews that he realized it was a dream after Scrooge offered to buy him a soda. In restrospect, the events being a dream make sense, as the story features Scrooge being fairly carefree with spending his money to beat Donald.
5th Apr '16 4:43:54 AM JulianLapostat
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* GoodLuckCharm: A recurring theme in Barks stories and also later writers.
** "The Magic Hourglass" by Barks deals with a hourglass that enriches the people who hold it, and gives bad luck to the people who lose it. By the time the hourglass is activated, the meaning of luck changes dramatically for the cast.
** A later story "The Backdated Lucky Charm" published by Egmont was about Donald creating a lucky charm by following instructions from a book. The lucky charm is a special one that enchants and preserves happy moments so that they can last as long as the wearer wishes. When Donald wishes that a particularly good evening for dinner never ends, the entire evening falls into a pattern of eternal repitition, with Donald the only one noticing something's wrong. He had wished that moment never ended, so at the point at which the moment should end, it repeats itself. As Donald realizes later: ''That's not a lucky charm!'' (He finally cancels the curse by wishing that the event never happened, which makes the entire plot AllJustADream).
17th Feb '16 10:50:41 AM Ace1225
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*WorthlessYellowRocks: Played with at the conclusion of Carl Barks' ''Twenty-Four Carat Moon''. Scrooge ends up getting to the second moon, which as the story's title suggest is made out of solid gold before any other Earthling, only to find an alien who claims to have arrived there some time ago, making the golden moon his. The alien agrees to trade the moon to earth for some dirt, which Scrooge naturally agrees to. However, the alien places the dirt in a machine he has, which turns it into an entirely new planet, with continents and oceans, that is capable of supporting life! The alien then flies off on the planet, completely satisfied, as he had come to place less value on the gold than he originally did when he came to the moon. This leaves Scrooge with possession of a moon made entirely out of gold, which is more than likely more than he's ever had previously, yet wondering whether or not he really got the better end of the deal.
** Also notable is that that much gold, with Scrooge stating in the story that the moon is 500 miles thick, would make all gold on the planet Earth completely worthless.
17th Feb '16 10:40:14 AM Ace1225
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* TwistEnding: The last page of Don Rosa's ''Return to Xanadu'' reveals that the treasure Scrooge spent the story looking for was at the bottom of the lake of Xanadu the entire time, which is where one of Scrooge's own treasures, The Crown of Genghis Khan, then ends up.
17th Feb '16 9:24:13 AM Ace1225
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*** Rosa's ''Crocodile Collector'' in fact has Scrooge attempt to cheat Donald out of the $10,000 he promised him for a rare crocodile, with the logic that since Donald brings him back a newborn it isn't worth the same price as a full-grown croc. Donald is perfectly aware Scrooge is doing this, but doesn't worry about it since he had the intelligence earlier to remember that the cave where he found the Crocodile was filled with ancient treasure, which he and his newphews collected, and then don't have to give Scrooge any part of since they got it on their own! Say what you want about him, but Donald has his moments where he does well for himself.
17th Feb '16 5:21:54 AM Ace1225
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* GreenAesop: Barks' ''Land of the Pygmy Indians" and the sequel by Don Rosa, ''War of the Wendigo'' both have Scrooge learning one of these. The first ends with him declaring part of the land he owns, which the titular ''Indians'' live on, a nature preserve and the second has him promising the same group, after one of his plant manager's devastates a forest in the north, to plant two trees for every one that he cuts down.

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* GreenAesop: Barks' ''Land of the Pygmy Indians" Indians'' and the sequel by Don Rosa, ''War of the Wendigo'' both have Scrooge learning one of these. The first ends with him declaring part of the land he owns, which the titular ''Indians'' Indians live on, a nature preserve and the second has him promising the same group, after one of his plant manager's devastates a forest in the north, to plant two trees for every one that he cuts down.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ComicBook.DisneyDucksComicUniverse