History Characters / GameOfThronesHouseStarkChildren

2nd Jun '18 10:24:36 AM cherrychels
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* YoungConqueror: Neither Tywin Lannister, nor even his father, think he is up to the task but Varys points out to Ned that Robb would hardly be the first. He quickly proves himself one of the most skilled battle commanders in the series.

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* YoungConqueror: Neither Tywin Lannister, nor even Lannister or his father, think he father believe Robb is up to the task but Varys points out to Ned that Robb would hardly be the first. He Robb quickly proves himself one of the most skilled battle commanders in the series.



** Downplayed. While Jon is one of the [[https://youtu.be/yarEbKyk8PU?t=147 straightest examples of a hero in the books]] as well, some of his grittier actions to save lives in the novels are removed from the show as a result of PragmaticAdaptation, such as pulling off a [[SwitchedAtBirth baby swap]] exchanging [[spoiler:Mance Rayder's child]] with [[spoiler:Gilly's]] to save a baby from being burned, fearing Melisandre wants to burn [[spoiler:Mance's child]] for his king's blood.[[note]]While Jon is certain Gilly’s son is safe because he has no king's blood and Stannis wouldn't sacrifice an innocent in cold blood without sufficient reason, and Jon has Gilly’s son raised under his protection with the care of wet nurses, Gilly -- though she loves Mance's son -- is understandably miserable over being separated from her child.[[/note]] In the show, the mutiny that results in Jon's stabbing is motivated entirely by xenophobia from a larger faction of Night's Watchmen. In the novels, Jon likewise works to protect the wildlings but while this does piss several Night's Watchmen off, several of Jon's actions in the fifth book compromise the Night's Watch stance on neutrality, layering the reasons of the mutineers, who are very reluctant about taking this action.

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** Downplayed. While Jon is one of the [[https://youtu.be/yarEbKyk8PU?t=147 straightest examples of a hero in the books]] as well, some of his grittier actions to save lives in the novels are removed from the show as a result of PragmaticAdaptation, such as pulling off a [[SwitchedAtBirth baby swap]] exchanging [[spoiler:Mance Rayder's child]] with [[spoiler:Gilly's]] to save a baby from being burned, the kid by preventing Melisandre's HumanSacrifice, fearing Melisandre wants to burn [[spoiler:Mance's child]] for his king's blood.[[note]]While Jon blood while he is certain [[spoiler:Gilly's son is safe from Melisandre because Gilly's son has no king's blood]].[[note]]Jon is certain Gilly’s son is safe because he has no king's blood and Stannis wouldn't sacrifice an innocent in cold blood without sufficient reason, and Jon has Gilly’s son raised under his protection with the care of wet nurses, nurses. Though Gilly -- though she loves Mance's son -- son, she is understandably miserable over being separated from her child.own child, having been forced to leave her son at Castle Black and take Mance's son to Oldtown as part of Jon's plan to prevent Melisandre's HumanSacrifice.[[/note]] In the show, the mutiny that results in Jon's stabbing is motivated entirely by xenophobia from a larger faction of Night's Watchmen. In the novels, Jon likewise works to protect the wildlings but while this does piss several Night's Watchmen off, several of Jon's actions in the fifth book compromise the Night's Watch stance on neutrality, layering the reasons of the mutineers, who are very reluctant about taking this action.
2nd Jun '18 9:54:25 AM cherrychels
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* AdaptationDyeJob: In the books, all the Stark children except for Arya and certainly Jon have the Tully family hair and eyes. In the show, Bran appears to inherit the Stark family look alongside Arya and Jon while Rickon is a compromise with light-brown hair.

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* AdaptationDyeJob: In the books, all most of the Stark children except (except for Arya and certainly Jon Jon) have the Tully family hair and eyes. In the show, Bran appears to inherit the Stark family look alongside Arya and Jon while Rickon is a compromise with light-brown hair.



** Likewise, Jon is also of mixed ancestry as well. [[spoiler: He's later revealed to be Ned's nephew. As the son of Ned's sister Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen, Jon is descended from the First Men and Valyrian blood.]]

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** Likewise, Jon is also of mixed ancestry as well. [[spoiler: He's He is later revealed to be Ned's nephew. As the son of Ned's sister Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen, Jon is descended from the First Men and Valyrian blood.]]



* TheGoodKing: He aspires to this, and embodies some aspects of the trope.

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* TheGoodKing: He aspires to this, and embodies some aspects of the trope. He is compassionate, honorable and good-hearted as king, strives to do the right thing, and [[FrontLineGeneral fights alongside his men]].



** Downplayed. While Jon is one of the [[https://youtu.be/yarEbKyk8PU?t=147 straightest examples of a hero in the books]] as well, some of his grittier actions to save lives in the novels are removed from the show as a result of PragmaticAdaptation, such as pulling off a [[SwitchedAtBirth baby swap]] exchanging [[spoiler:Mance Rayder's child]] with [[spoiler:Gilly's]] out of fears that [[spoiler:Mance's kid]] could be used as a HumanSacrifice by Melisandre, who is seeking king's blood.[[note]]While Jon is certain Gilly’s son is safe because Stannis wouldn't sacrifice an innocent in cold blood without sufficient reason and Jon has Gilly’s son raised under his protection with the care of wet nurses, Gilly -- though she loves Mance's son -- is understandably miserable over being separated from her child.[[/note]] In the show, the mutiny that results in Jon's stabbing is motivated entirely by xenophobia from a larger faction of Night's Watchmen. In the novels, Jon likewise works to protect the wildlings but while this does piss several Night's Watchmen off, several of Jon's actions in the fifth book compromise the Night's Watch stance on neutrality, layering the reasons of the mutineers, who are very reluctant about taking this action.

to:

** Downplayed. While Jon is one of the [[https://youtu.be/yarEbKyk8PU?t=147 straightest examples of a hero in the books]] as well, some of his grittier actions to save lives in the novels are removed from the show as a result of PragmaticAdaptation, such as pulling off a [[SwitchedAtBirth baby swap]] exchanging [[spoiler:Mance Rayder's child]] with [[spoiler:Gilly's]] out of fears that to save a baby from being burned, fearing Melisandre wants to burn [[spoiler:Mance's kid]] could be used as a HumanSacrifice by Melisandre, who is seeking child]] for his king's blood.[[note]]While Jon is certain Gilly’s son is safe because he has no king's blood and Stannis wouldn't sacrifice an innocent in cold blood without sufficient reason reason, and Jon has Gilly’s son raised under his protection with the care of wet nurses, Gilly -- though she loves Mance's son -- is understandably miserable over being separated from her child.[[/note]] In the show, the mutiny that results in Jon's stabbing is motivated entirely by xenophobia from a larger faction of Night's Watchmen. In the novels, Jon likewise works to protect the wildlings but while this does piss several Night's Watchmen off, several of Jon's actions in the fifth book compromise the Night's Watch stance on neutrality, layering the reasons of the mutineers, who are very reluctant about taking this action.



* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Not that she doesn't undergo TraumaCongaLine in the books, but her wedding night rape with Ramsay is entirely native and exclusive to the show as a result of her character's storyline becoming a composite with that of Jeyne Poole's in the book.

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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Not that she doesn't undergo TraumaCongaLine in the books, but her wedding night rape with Ramsay is entirely native and exclusive to the show as a result of her character's storyline becoming a composite with that of Jeyne Poole's in the book.



* BigBrotherWorship: Seems to be closest to her brother Jon Snow out of all her siblings (Confirmed WordOfGod) The [[TheGlomp big hug]] she gives him when he gives [[CoolSword Needle]] to her is absolutely adorable. In Season 7, upon hearing that Jon has reclaimed Winterfell, Arya ''immediately'' abandons her plan to go to King's Landing and heads straight home.

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* BigBrotherWorship: Seems to be Is the closest to her brother Jon Snow out of all her siblings (Confirmed (confirmed by WordOfGod) The -- the [[TheGlomp big hug]] she gives him when he gives [[CoolSword Needle]] to her is absolutely adorable. In Season 7, upon hearing that Jon has reclaimed Winterfell, Arya ''immediately'' abandons her plan to go to King's Landing and heads straight home.
2nd Jun '18 8:58:13 AM outlander2012
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-->'''Daenerys''': We all enjoy what we're good at.
-->'''Jon''': [[ItSucksToBeTheChosenOne I don't]].



** Choosing to save the wildlings from the White Walkers gets him betrayed and murdered by his own brethren. He hangs a {{Lampshade}} on this to Ser Davos on his resurrection, noting that tried to do the right thing and failed. All Davos tells him is that he must be prepared to fail again to do what's right.

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** Choosing to save the wildlings from the White Walkers gets him betrayed and murdered by his own brethren. He hangs a {{Lampshade}} on this to Ser Davos on his resurrection, noting that he tried to do the right thing and failed. All Davos tells him is that he must be prepared to fail again to do what's right.
1st Jun '18 6:20:13 PM TrollBrutal
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* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown as king. Among the Five Kings, three kings -- Robb Stark, Stannis Baratheon, and Balon Grejoy -- do not wear a crown. Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask, and project majesty. Robb wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and Edmure addresses his nephew on a FirstNameBasis, Robb insists Edmure address him as, "Your grace." In the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry.[[/labelnote]]

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* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown as king. Among the Five Kings, three kings -- Robb Stark, Stannis Baratheon, and Balon Grejoy -- do not wear a crown. Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask, and project majesty. Robb wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and Edmure addresses his nephew on a FirstNameBasis, Robb insists Edmure address him as, "Your grace." In the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry.[[/labelnote]]
1st Jun '18 5:52:03 PM cherrychels
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* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown (though neither do Stannis Baratheon or Balon Greyjoy. Among the Five Kings, only Renly Baratheon and Joffrey Baratheon wear a crown). Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask and project majesty. Robb wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and Edmure addresses his nephew on FirstNameBasis, Robb insists Edmure addresses him as, "Your grace." In the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry.[[/labelnote]]

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* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown (though neither do Stannis Baratheon or Balon Greyjoy. as king. Among the Five Kings, only Renly Baratheon three kings -- Robb Stark, Stannis Baratheon, and Joffrey Baratheon Balon Grejoy -- do not wear a crown).crown. Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Book!Robb books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask mask, and project majesty. Robb wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and Edmure addresses his nephew on a FirstNameBasis, Robb insists Edmure addresses address him as, "Your grace." In the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry.[[/labelnote]]



* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: Leads the small party that captures the Kingslayer (Jaime Lannister), but not before the Lannister kills 10 men in the ambush. Only the return with the prize is shown.

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* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: Leads the small party that captures the Kingslayer (Jaime Lannister), Kingslayer, Jaime Lannister, but not before the Lannister kills 10 men in the ambush. Only the return with the prize is shown.
1st Jun '18 4:43:52 PM cherrychels
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* AdaptationalIntelligence: Inverted. While not without his moments, TV Jon Snow relies more on AsskickingEqualsAuthority than his intellect. This is a direct contrast to his book counterpart, a GeniusBruiser who devotes more time to solving problems with his mind rather than his sword [[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Jon is well-read and culturally aware, being a fanboy of Daeron the Young Dragon, knowing a lot about the history of the Free Cities, and much of the lore of the North and the First Men. During the Battle of the Wall, he fights alongside the archers and assists in the efforts to ward off the Thenns' attack while assisting in command of the Wall's defense. As Lord Commander, he serves as strategic adviser for King Stannis and rather brilliantly helps the latter's campaign to retake the North while maintaining the Watch's neutrality. Jon also oversees the integration of the wildlings south of the Wall, step-by-step with diplomatic back-and-forth between multiple factions, and negotiates and haggles a loan for winter provisions from the Iron Bank of the Braavos, proving his sophistication and worldliness. He also has plans to build glasshouses for winter provisions, starting apprenticeships for some of Watchmen so they can learn skills, and in the books, Jon sends Sam to Oldtown so he can study to be a maester and provide real intelligence from the Citadel[[/labelnote]].

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* AdaptationalIntelligence: Inverted. While not without his moments, TV Jon Snow relies more on AsskickingEqualsAuthority than his intellect. This is a direct contrast to his book counterpart, a GeniusBruiser who devotes more time to solving problems with his mind rather than his sword sword. [[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Jon is well-read and culturally aware, being a fanboy of Daeron the Young Dragon, knowing a lot about the history of the Free Cities, and much of the lore of the North and the First Men. During the Battle of the Wall, he fights alongside the archers and assists in the efforts to ward off the Thenns' attack while assisting in command of the Wall's defense. As Lord Commander, he serves as strategic adviser for King Stannis and rather brilliantly helps the latter's campaign to retake the North while maintaining the Watch's neutrality. Jon also oversees the integration and settlement of the wildlings south of the Wall, step-by-step with is a diplomatic back-and-forth between multiple factions, factions at Castle Black and along the Wall, and negotiates and haggles a loan for winter provisions from the Iron Bank of the Braavos, proving his sophistication and worldliness. He also has plans to build glasshouses for winter provisions, starting apprenticeships for some of so the Watchmen so they can learn needed skills, and in the books, Jon sends Sam to Oldtown so he can study to be a maester and provide real intelligence from the Citadel[[/labelnote]].Citadel.[[/labelnote]]
1st Jun '18 4:35:03 PM cherrychels
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* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown (though neither do Stannis Baratheon or Balon Greyjoy. Among the Five Kings, only Renly Baratheon and Joffrey Baratheon wear a crown). Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that Kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask and project majesty. He wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and notably when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and the latter addresses his nephew on FirstNameBasis, Robb insists that he call him "Your grace" whereas in the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry[[/labelnote]]

to:

* ModestRoyalty: He doesn't wear a crown (though neither do Stannis Baratheon or Balon Greyjoy. Among the Five Kings, only Renly Baratheon and Joffrey Baratheon wear a crown). Even his book counterpart wears a crown in the same style of those worn by the old Kings of Winter. Additionally, when the Stark troops cheer after their first victory against the Lannisters, the first thing Robb does is to somberly remind his men that the war has only begun, and that their final victory is far from assured.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Book!Robb is quite different on this. The novels insist that Kings kings do have to put on the pageantry, the kingly mask and project majesty. He Robb wears the bronze crown of the Kings of Winter in the novels, and notably when he and Blackfish confront Edmure Tully and the latter Edmure addresses his nephew on FirstNameBasis, Robb insists that he call Edmure addresses him as, "Your grace" whereas in grace." In the show, it's Blackfish who insists on the pageantry[[/labelnote]]pageantry.[[/labelnote]]



* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: See Ned's entry. One of the reasons Robb is respected by his fellows is because he's almost always on the frontlines with them and has ample opportunity to show his skill as a fighter to them. In contrast to most other prospective kings in the war, who rarely fight on the front lines.

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* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: See Ned's entry. One of the reasons Robb is respected by the Northmen and his fellows followers is because he's Robb is almost always on the [[FrontlineGeneral frontlines with them them]] and has ample opportunity to show his skill as a fighter to them. In contrast to most other prospective kings in the war, who rarely fight on the front lines.



* TechnicianVersusPerformer: His leadership of the rebel forces against Tywin Lannister, essentially. Lord Tywin is a good soldier and strategist due to hard and careful work, while Robb is a born conqueror. Ultimately, Tywin's exploitation of the strategic imbalance between the Iron Throne and the Stark kingdom, plus Robb's personal missteps, proves decisive in the Riverlands theater. Robb, on the other hand, bet the whole war on winning enough battles.

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* TechnicianVersusPerformer: His leadership of the rebel forces against Tywin Lannister, essentially.Lannister. Lord Tywin is a good soldier and strategist due to hard and careful work, while Robb is a born conqueror. Ultimately, Tywin's exploitation of the strategic imbalance between the Iron Throne and the Stark kingdom, plus Robb's personal missteps, proves decisive in the Riverlands theater. Robb, on the other hand, bet the whole war on winning enough battles.



** When he meets Mance Rayder, the reason Jon provides for his [[FakeDefector defection]] is not, as in the show, due to his real disgust with Craster but his BastardAngst, which is something he feels as well, though Jon recognizes he has had it far better than many illegitimate children with a family he loves. In the show, Jon is emphasized as having skepticism about Melisandre's magic and powers but in the novels, while he remains pretty skeptical, he starts believing some of the Red Woman’s words (who is admittedly a much grayer character in the books) after witnessing her actions to spare Mance and when she gives him the chance to save his sister Arya from the Boltons.

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** When he meets Mance Rayder, the reason Jon provides for his [[FakeDefector defection]] is not, as in the show, due to his real disgust with Craster but his BastardAngst, which is something he feels as well, though Jon recognizes he has had it far better than many illegitimate children with a family he loves. In the show, Jon is emphasized as having skepticism about Melisandre's magic and powers but in the novels, while he still remains pretty skeptical, he starts believing some of the Red Woman’s words (who is admittedly a much grayer character in the books) after witnessing her actions to spare Mance [[spoiler:Mance and when she gives him the chance to save his sister Arya from the Boltons.Boltons]].



* CombatPragmatist: Though starting out quite idealistic, by Season 4, he's able to make the hard call to not respond to a group of Wildlings slaughtering nearby villages, especially since he knows full well it's a distraction for an attack on the Wall itself. He shoves a sword through the back of lead-mutineer Karl's skull when the situation called for it. Even his overall fighting style is becoming more and more like this as, during the Wildlings' attack on the Wall, Jon uses a mixture of kicks and the environment around him, as well as typical swordplay, to kill several enemy combatants. He's fully fallen into this trope by Season 6, most notably when he's challenged by a bow-wielding Ramsay. Jon throws aside his Valyrian steel sword in favor of a simple shield lying in the mud, which he uses to block all of Ramsay's arrows, close the distance, and pummel him into submission.

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* CombatPragmatist: Though starting out quite idealistic, by Season 4, he's able to make the hard call to not respond to a group of Wildlings slaughtering nearby villages, especially since he knows full well it's a distraction for an attack on the Wall itself. He shoves a sword through the back of lead-mutineer Karl's skull when the situation called for it. Even his overall fighting style is becoming more and more like this as, during the Wildlings' wildlings' attack on the Wall, Jon uses a mixture of kicks and the environment around him, as well as typical swordplay, to kill several enemy combatants. He's fully fallen into Jon displays this trope by in Season 6, most notably 6 as well when he's challenged by a bow-wielding Ramsay. Jon throws aside his Valyrian steel sword in favor of a simple shield lying in the mud, which he uses to block all of Ramsay's arrows, close the distance, and pummel him into submission.



* ContraltoOfDanger: Sansa's voice notably deepens as she ages, fittingly coinciding with [[TookALevelInBadass her gradual turn into a]] {{Guile Hero}}ine.

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* ContraltoOfDanger: Sansa's voice notably deepens as she ages, matures, fittingly coinciding with [[TookALevelInBadass her gradual turn into a]] {{Guile Hero}}ine.



* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: Notably averted, despite it being her family's FatalFlaw early in the series and all her older family members -- except Jon -- falling prey to it. In contrast to her father, mother and older brother and sister who all trust the wrong people [[note]] Ned and Catelyn -- Littlefinger, Sansa -- Joffrey and Cersei, Robb -- the Greyjoys and to a certain degree the Freys [[/note]] Arya is savvy from the get-go and immediately dislikes the Lannisters, particularly Joffrey. She's also suitably guarded while surviving on her own, the only person she does [[{{TrueCompanions}} trust with her identity]] -- Gendry -- is [[{{HeroicBastard}} one of the rare good people in Westeros]] and her suspicions of people like Melisandre are quickly justified.

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* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: Notably averted, Averted, despite it being her family's FatalFlaw early in the series and all her older family members -- except Jon -- falling prey to it. In contrast to her father, mother and older brother and sister who all trust the wrong people [[note]] Ned and Catelyn -- Littlefinger, Sansa -- Joffrey and Cersei, Robb -- the Greyjoys and to a certain degree the Freys [[/note]] Arya is savvy from the get-go and immediately dislikes the Lannisters, particularly Joffrey. She's also suitably guarded while surviving on her own, the only person she does [[{{TrueCompanions}} trust with her identity]] -- Gendry -- is [[{{HeroicBastard}} one of the rare good people in Westeros]] and her suspicions of people like Melisandre are quickly justified.



* TheMentor: Has a range of them from the good (her father Ned and her dancing master Syrio Forel), to the morally ambiguous (Jaqen H'ghar). Her moral compass notably alters under their tutelage, young and still pure-hearted under her father and Syrio but smarter and more sneaky when she interacts with Jaqen. When she becomes The Hound's hostage and they form a quasi-friendship, she gets progressively darker and more violent, verging on StrawNihilist by the mid-point of Season 4, her body-count noticeably increases as well.

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* TheMentor: Has a range of them from the good (her father Ned and her dancing master Syrio Forel), to the morally ambiguous (Jaqen H'ghar). Her moral compass notably alters under their tutelage, young and still pure-hearted under her father and Syrio but smarter and more sneaky when she interacts with Jaqen. When she becomes The Hound's hostage and they form a quasi-friendship, she gets progressively darker and more violent, verging on StrawNihilist by the mid-point of Season 4, her body-count noticeably increases as well.
1st Jun '18 4:24:05 PM cherrychels
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* AmazonChaser: The two women whom Jon has fallen in love with (Ygritte [[spoiler:and Daenerys]]) are both fierce and martial, with Ygritte being a wildling warrior and archer and [[spoiler:Daenerys being a DragonRider YoungConqueror who is also a FrontlineGeneral and commander in her battles]]. [[labelnote:From the books]]Jon, reflecting on his growing attraction for the character Val "the Wildling Princess" who was AdaptedOut, observes that Val is, "lonely and lovely and lethal.[[/labelnote]]

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* AmazonChaser: The two women whom Jon has fallen in love with (Ygritte [[spoiler:and Daenerys]]) are both fierce and martial, with Ygritte being a wildling warrior and archer and [[spoiler:Daenerys being a DragonRider YoungConqueror who is also a FrontlineGeneral and commander in her battles]]. [[labelnote:From the books]]Jon, reflecting on his growing attraction for the character Val "the Wildling Princess" who was AdaptedOut, observes that Val is, is "lonely and lovely and lethal.[[/labelnote]]"[[/labelnote]]
1st Jun '18 4:21:51 PM cherrychels
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** This trope is [[ZigzaggedTrope zigzagged]] because the show, for reasons of RuleOfPerception and simplification, dial down Robb's strategic genius to play up the aesop of "winning battles and losing wars" whereas in the books, it's clear that while Robb did make huge mistakes, Tywin mainly won due to amazingly good luck.

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** This trope is [[ZigzaggedTrope zigzagged]] because the show, for reasons of RuleOfPerception and simplification, dial down Robb's strategic genius to play up the aesop Aesop of "winning battles and losing wars" whereas in the books, it's clear that while Robb did make huge mistakes, Tywin mainly won due to amazingly good luck.



** Lampshaded by Tyrion Lanister, who comments that Robb won every battle but still lost the war.

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** Lampshaded by Tyrion Lanister, Lannister, who comments that Robb won every battle but still lost the war.



* AdaptationalIntelligence: Inverted. While not without his moments, TV Jon Snow relies more on AsskickingEqualsAuthority than his intellect. This is a direct contrast to his book counterpart, a GeniusBruiser who devotes more time to solving problems with his mind rather than his sword.[[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Jon is fairly well read and culturally aware, being a fanboy of Daeron the Young Dragon, knowing a lot about the history of the Free Cities, and much of the lore of the North and the First Men. During the Battle of the Wall, he fights alongside the archers and assists in the efforts to ward off the Thenns' attack while assisting in command of the Wall's defense; as Lord Commander, he serves as strategic adviser for King Stannis and rather brilliantly helps the latter's campaign to retake the North while maintaining the Watch's neutrality. Jon also oversees the integration of the Wildlings south of the wall, step-by-step with diplomatic back-and-forth between multiple factions, and negotiates and haggles a loan for winter provisions from the Iron Bank of the Braavos, proving his sophistication and worldliness. He also has plans on building glasshouses for winter provisions, starting a MasterApprenticeChain for some of his Night-Watchmen, and rather than in the show, Sam Tarly asking to be sent to the Citadel, in the books, it's Jon who sternly commands Sam to go and study and provide real intelligence from the Citadel[[/labelnote]].

to:

* AdaptationalIntelligence: Inverted. While not without his moments, TV Jon Snow relies more on AsskickingEqualsAuthority than his intellect. This is a direct contrast to his book counterpart, a GeniusBruiser who devotes more time to solving problems with his mind rather than his sword.sword [[labelnote:From the books]]Book!Jon is fairly well read well-read and culturally aware, being a fanboy of Daeron the Young Dragon, knowing a lot about the history of the Free Cities, and much of the lore of the North and the First Men. During the Battle of the Wall, he fights alongside the archers and assists in the efforts to ward off the Thenns' attack while assisting in command of the Wall's defense; as defense. As Lord Commander, he serves as strategic adviser for King Stannis and rather brilliantly helps the latter's campaign to retake the North while maintaining the Watch's neutrality. Jon also oversees the integration of the Wildlings wildlings south of the wall, Wall, step-by-step with diplomatic back-and-forth between multiple factions, and negotiates and haggles a loan for winter provisions from the Iron Bank of the Braavos, proving his sophistication and worldliness. He also has plans on building to build glasshouses for winter provisions, starting a MasterApprenticeChain apprenticeships for some of his Night-Watchmen, Watchmen so they can learn skills, and rather than in the show, Sam Tarly asking to be sent to the Citadel, in the books, it's Jon who sternly commands sends Sam to go and Oldtown so he can study to be a maester and provide real intelligence from the Citadel[[/labelnote]].



* AmazonChaser: The two women whom Jon has fallen in love with (Ygritte [[spoiler:and Daenerys]]) are both fierce and martial, with Ygritte being a wildling warrior and archer and [[spoiler:Daenerys being a DragonRider YoungConqueror who is also a FrontlineGeneral and commander in her battles]]. [[labelnote:From the books]]Jon, reflecting on his growing attraction for the character Val "the Wildling Princess" who was AdaptedOut, observes that Val is, "lonely and lovely and lethal"[[/labelnote]].

to:

* AmazonChaser: The two women whom Jon has fallen in love with (Ygritte [[spoiler:and Daenerys]]) are both fierce and martial, with Ygritte being a wildling warrior and archer and [[spoiler:Daenerys being a DragonRider YoungConqueror who is also a FrontlineGeneral and commander in her battles]]. [[labelnote:From the books]]Jon, reflecting on his growing attraction for the character Val "the Wildling Princess" who was AdaptedOut, observes that Val is, "lonely and lovely and lethal"[[/labelnote]].lethal.[[/labelnote]]



-->'''Jon:''' When we had feasts, our family would sit up here... and I’d sit down there. ''(nods towards a small table in the corner of Winterfell's great hall)''
-->'''Melisandre:''' Could have been worse, Jon Snow. You had a family. You had feasts.

to:

-->'''Jon:''' When we had feasts, our family would sit up here... and I’d sit down there. ''(nods towards a small table in the corner of Winterfell's great hall)''
-->'''Melisandre:'''
hall)''\\
'''Melisandre:'''
Could have been worse, Jon Snow. You had a family. You had feasts.\\
'''Jon:''' Aye, you're right. I was luckier than most.



* AFatherToHisMen: While he does not start as an authority figure, many of the low-ranking Night's Watch men do look up to him. Averted at the end of Season 5, when he is betrayed and murdered by most of his own men.

to:

* AFatherToHisMen: While he does not start as an authority figure, many of the low-ranking Night's Watch men Watchmen do look up to him. Averted at the end of Season 5, when he is betrayed and murdered by most of his own men.



* GeneralFailure: In "Battle of the Bastards". Jon fails to stick to his military strategy after Ramsay activates Jon's RelativeButton by killing Jon's brother at the start of the battle, after which Jon charges the Bolton's forces alone into the thick of things, unleashing his prodigious swordsman skills on enemy soliders. Unfortunately, this action places Jon's own forces in danger as the battle would have been lost if TheCavalry had not rode in to save the day.

to:

* GeneralFailure: In "Battle of the Bastards". Jon fails to stick to his military strategy after Ramsay activates Jon's RelativeButton by killing Jon's brother at the start of the battle, after which Jon charges the Bolton's forces alone into the thick of things, unleashing his prodigious swordsman skills on enemy soliders.soldiers. Unfortunately, this action places Jon's own forces in danger as the battle would have been lost if TheCavalry had not rode in to save the day.



* InformedAbility: Jon Snow is considered a great leader, and described by Sansa as a "military man" and someone who is a MagneticHero:

to:

* InformedAbility: Jon Snow is considered a great leader, leader and is described by Sansa as a "military man" and someone who is a MagneticHero:man."



* JumpedAtTheCall: Jon is overly eager to join the Night's Watch, despite his CoolUncle Benjen's advice to wait a while. Later, he volunteers himself to join Qhorin Halfhand's ranging party. Mance Rayder picks up on this trait very quickly, saying that he believes that the thing Jon wants, most of all, is to be a hero. This attitude changes after his resurrection, where he becomes a ReluctantHero and quasi-DeathSeeker who initially had to be coaxed by Dolorous Edd, Sansa, and Ramsay's [[TheCallKnowsWhereYouLive threats against his family and those under his protection]] to fight again, motivating Jon to return to the battlefield and defend the North. In Season 7, Jon tells [[spoiler:the Northern lords that he never wanted to be king, but he accepted it beause the North is his home and he will continue fighting for it. He reveals to Daenerys that he does not like what he is good at]].

to:

* JumpedAtTheCall: Jon is overly eager to join the Night's Watch, despite his CoolUncle Benjen's advice to wait a while. Later, he volunteers himself to join Qhorin Halfhand's ranging party. Mance Rayder picks up on this trait very quickly, saying that he believes that the thing Jon wants, most of all, is to be a hero. This attitude changes after his resurrection, where he becomes a ReluctantHero and quasi-DeathSeeker who initially had to be coaxed by Dolorous Edd, Sansa, and Ramsay's [[TheCallKnowsWhereYouLive threats against his family and those under his protection]] to fight again, motivating Jon to return to the battlefield and defend the North. In Season 7, Jon tells [[spoiler:the Northern lords that he never wanted to be king, but he accepted it beause because the North is his home and he will continue fighting for it. He reveals to Daenerys that he does not like what he is good at]].



* MissingMom: Jon knows nothing about his mother. Ned promises Jon they will talk about his mother some day when they reunite, [[DeadlyDeferredConversation but they never see each other again]]. In the story Ned tells King Robert Baratheon when Robert pushes Ned for the name of the woman he claimed to have had an affair with -- Jon's mother -- Ned responds she is a woman called "Wylla." However, Stannis Baratheon is quite skeptical that Jon Snow was the result of a one-night stand, noting that it wasn't Ned Stark's style. The truth is that his mother is Ned's sister Lyanna Stark, with Jon's biological father being [[TheAce Prince Rhaegar Targaryen]], meaning Jon is actually Ned's nephew whom Ned claimed as his illegitimate son in order to protect him from Lyanna's betrothed Robert Baratheon and Ned raised Jon as his own child.

to:

* MissingMom: Jon knows nothing about his mother. Ned promises Jon they will talk about his mother some day someday when they reunite, [[DeadlyDeferredConversation but they never see each other again]]. In the story Ned tells King Robert Baratheon when Robert pushes Ned for the name of the woman he claimed to have had an affair with -- Jon's mother -- Ned responds she is a woman called "Wylla." However, Stannis Baratheon is quite skeptical that Jon Snow was the result of a one-night stand, noting that it wasn't Ned Stark's style. The truth is that his mother is Ned's sister Lyanna Stark, with Jon's biological father being [[TheAce Prince Rhaegar Targaryen]], meaning Jon is actually Ned's nephew whom Ned claimed as his illegitimate son in order to protect him from Lyanna's betrothed Robert Baratheon and Ned raised Jon as his own child.



* NewJobAsThePlotDemands: Jon Snow has been at various times, squire for Lord Commander Mormont (S1), ranger for the Night's Watch(First Half S2), deep cover spy under Qhorin Halfhand (Second Half S2-S3), steward and de-facto battle commander (S4), Lord Commander (S5), renegade Night's Watchmen and warlord (S6) and King in the North (S7). The only other character with this many job changes is Ser Bronn of the Blackwater.

to:

* NewJobAsThePlotDemands: In Season 1, Jon Snow has been at various times, is a squire for Lord Commander Mormont (S1), Mormont. In Season 2, he is a ranger for the Night's Watch(First Half S2), Watch and later, a deep cover spy under Qhorin Halfhand (Second Half S2-S3), until the end of Season 3. In Season 4, he is a steward and de-facto battle commander (S4), commander. In Season 5, he is Lord Commander (S5), renegade of the Night's Watchmen Watch. In Season 6, after his resurrection and warlord (S6) and he leaves the Watch, Jon is a battle commander. He is later elected King in the North (S7).North. The only other character with this many job changes is Ser Bronn of the Blackwater.



* TheyDo: [[spoiler:With Daeenerys Targaryen in the Season 7 finale]].

to:

* TheyDo: [[spoiler:With Daeenerys Daenerys Targaryen in the Season 7 finale]].



--->'''Ned Stark''':"I will find you a better husband, someone who is brave, gentle, and strong."
--->'''Sansa Stark''':"I don't want someone who is brave, gentle, and strong, [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor I want him!]]"

to:

--->'''Ned Stark''':"I will find you a better husband, someone who is brave, gentle, and strong."
--->'''Sansa
"\\
'''Sansa
Stark''':"I don't want someone who is brave, gentle, and strong, [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor I want him!]]"



* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: May be a family trait; "I trust her, even though she tells me not to" could almost be the words of House Stark. She completely fails to see the parts of people she doesn't want to see, especially with regard to Joffrey. While life at court makes her a bit warier, it remains to be seen if her trust in Shae, and Tyrion by extension, is a good call. This trait has pretty much vanished by Season 5 -- such as the way she interacts with Myranda, not fooled for a second by the latter's BitchInSheepsClothing act. Although she, and Littlefinger apparently, ''seriously'' misjudge how crazy Ramsay is and Sansa only sees his MaskOfSanity crack just before the wedding.

to:

* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: May be a family trait; "I trust her, even though she tells me not to" could almost be the words of House Stark. She completely fails to see the parts of people she doesn't want to see, especially with regard to Joffrey. While life at court makes her a bit warier, more wary, it remains to be seen if her trust in Shae, and Tyrion by extension, is a good call. This trait has pretty much vanished by Season 5 -- such as the way she interacts with Myranda, not fooled for a second by the latter's BitchInSheepsClothing act. Although she, and Littlefinger apparently, ''seriously'' misjudge how crazy Ramsay is and Sansa only sees his MaskOfSanity crack just before the wedding.



* LookingForLoveInAllTheWrongPlaces: In Season 1, she's besotted with a PrinceCharmless of teenage royalty and takes a shine to the aformentioned Ser Loras Tyrell.

to:

* LookingForLoveInAllTheWrongPlaces: In Season 1, she's besotted with a PrinceCharmless of teenage royalty and takes a shine to the aformentioned aforementioned Ser Loras Tyrell.



* BrokenBird: Arya's experiences change her from the PluckyGirl and TomboyPrincess that she was in the first season into slowly becoming a cold killer desiring revenge on everyone that she feels as wronged her family and friends.

to:

* BrokenBird: Arya's experiences change her from the PluckyGirl and TomboyPrincess that she was in the first season into slowly becoming a cold killer desiring who desires revenge on everyone that she feels as has wronged her family and friends.



* NobleFugitive: A highranking member and a child of House Stark forced to be on the run after her family starts being purged.
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Yes, Meryn Trant was an absolute scumbag of a person who completely deserved to die, but Arya has to find out the hard way that ''no one'' steals a Face from the Faceless Men and gets off scott-free, even if it is for a noble cause.

to:

* NobleFugitive: A highranking high-ranking member and a child of House Stark forced to be on the run after her family starts being purged.
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Yes, Meryn Trant was an absolute scumbag of a person who completely deserved to die, but Arya has to find out the hard way that ''no one'' steals a Face from the Faceless Men and gets off scott-free, scot-free, even if it is for a noble cause.



* SignatureStyle: When she approaches her particular targets (especially those on her list) she makes it a point to kill them in an appropriately KarmicDeath, in a manner that specifically echoes the way her victims killed people she cared about. This began with Polliver in Season 4, where she in an IronicEcho replayed his exchange with Lommy Greenhands and it continues from there, culminating in her murder of Walder Frey by slashing his throat the way Catelyn died, and feeding him pies of his children in a manner echoing the Rat Cook.

to:

* SignatureStyle: When she approaches her particular targets (especially those on her list) she makes it a point to kill them in an appropriately KarmicDeath, in a manner that specifically echoes the way her victims killed people she cared about. This began with Polliver in Season 4, where she -- in an IronicEcho -- replayed his exchange with Lommy Greenhands and it continues from there, culminating in her murder of Walder Frey by slashing his throat the way Catelyn died, and feeding him pies of his children in a manner echoing the Rat Cook.



* TookALevelInBadass: Much of her story arc is how incredibly badass she becomes with every passing second. She stoods up to bigger bullies, traveled with the Night's Watch recruits, survived encounters with the Mountain, ordered around a super-assassin, stared down Tywin Lannister without flinching, attacks the Hound with a knife and has to be restrained, frequently stands up to the Hound, kills the Frey soldier who defiled her brother's corpse and murdered the shit out of Lannister toadie Polliver, psychotic rapist Rorge, and Kingsguard Meryn Trant.

to:

* TookALevelInBadass: Much of her story arc is how incredibly badass she becomes with every passing second. She stoods stands up to bigger bullies, traveled travels with the Night's Watch recruits, survived survives encounters with the Mountain, ordered orders around a super-assassin, stared stares down Tywin Lannister without flinching, attacks the Hound with a knife and has to be restrained, frequently stands up to the Hound, kills the Frey soldier who defiled her brother's corpse and murdered the shit out of Lannister toadie Polliver, psychotic rapist Rorge, and Kingsguard Meryn Trant.



* DeadGuyJunior: His name is Brandon, the same as his father's older brother (and countless long dead Starks).

to:

* DeadGuyJunior: His name is Brandon, the same as his father's older brother (and countless long dead long-dead Starks).



* DreamingOfThingsToCome: When he finally follows the crow into the family crypt, he sees his father. That same episode, Winterfell receives word that Ned has been executed by Joffrey. Happens again with Theons's betrayal and Rodrik's death.

to:

* DreamingOfThingsToCome: When he finally follows the crow into the family crypt, he sees his father. That same episode, Winterfell receives word that Ned has been executed by Joffrey. Happens again with Theons's Theon's betrayal and Rodrik's death.
1st Jun '18 2:50:49 PM foxmccloud4387
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Added DiffLines:

-->'''Jon:''' When we had feasts, our family would sit up here... and I’d sit down there. ''(nods towards a small table in the corner of Winterfell's great hall)''
-->'''Melisandre:''' Could have been worse, Jon Snow. You had a family. You had feasts.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Characters.GameOfThronesHouseStarkChildren