History Characters / GameOfThronesHouseFrey

23rd Apr '17 8:34:20 AM Eievie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[Characters/GameOfThrones Click here to return to the main character page]]

to:

[[Characters/GameOfThrones Click here to return to
!!!For
the main character page]]
index, see [[AC:[[Characters/GameOfThrones here]]]]
!!!See also the [[Characters/ASongOfIceAndFireHouseFrey book character sheet]] for these characters.
10th Apr '17 11:37:21 AM Golondrina
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LesCollaborateurs: How they are seen by the Riverlands resistance, puppet rulers for the Lannisters. The fact that the Freys are incompetent in policing the Riverlands and cutting down the brigandage after the Red Wedding and lose the seat Riverrun to the Tullys, and need the help of Lannister forces to cement their role, more than ensure that they will never be more than a puppet for an occupation.



* LesCollaborateurs: How they are seen by the Riverlands resistance, puppet rulers for the Lannisters. The fact that the Freys are incompetent in policing the Riverlands and cutting down the brigandage after the Red Wedding and lose the seat Riverrun to the Tullys, and need the help of Lannister forces to cement their role, more than ensure that they will never be more than a puppet for an occupation.
27th Mar '17 1:05:15 PM TrollBrutal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:It may have seemed like a good idea at the time to betray the Starks and Tullys at the Red Wedding but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
27th Mar '17 11:50:48 AM TywinIsGod
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right may have seemed like a good idea at the time but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]

to:

* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right [[spoiler:It may have seemed like a good idea at the time to betray the Starks and Tullys at the Red Wedding but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
24th Mar '17 11:51:51 PM TywinIsGod
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* KickTheDog: Murdering Talisa and her child in such a violent, messy manner has got to be this.
21st Mar '17 1:37:13 PM gk3389127
Is there an issue? Send a Message
19th Mar '17 12:47:49 AM TywinIsGod
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right may have seemed like a good idea at the time but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
[[/folder]]



* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right may have seemed like a good idea at the time but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
[[/folder]]

to:

* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right may have seemed like a good idea at the time but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
[[/folder]]
19th Mar '17 12:47:19 AM TywinIsGod
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TooDumbToLive: [[spoiler:Violating guest right may have seemed like a good idea at the time but given it crosses a serious line that no-one will ever forget and that he's now promoted to scapegoat it probably wasn't a good idea at all.]]
18th Mar '17 12:13:20 AM karategal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Early in Season 4, Sansa mentions to Tyrion that they also stripped Lady Catelyn of all her clothes and threw her into the Trident - again a mockery of funerary rites, in this case House Tully's VikingFuneral tradition (where a boat is sent downstream with an burning arrow fired upon it). [[EvilIsPetty Yup]], [[SarcasmMode what charming people the Freys seem to be]].

to:

** Early in Season 4, Sansa mentions to Tyrion that they also stripped Lady Catelyn of all her clothes and threw her into the Trident - -- again a mockery of funerary rites, in this case House Tully's VikingFuneral tradition (where a boat is sent downstream with an burning arrow fired upon it). [[EvilIsPetty Yup]], [[SarcasmMode what charming people the Freys seem to be]].



* MassiveNumberedSiblings: The GOT Wiki has listed roughly ''twenty'' named descendants who have been name-dropped or identified within the show at this point. This is barely even scratching the surface of the family from the ''books'' - and on top of ''that'', there seem to be a few CanonForeigner descendants added to the show, as listed below. The TV show did mercifully condense this down to about six major recurring characters: Walder Frey, his young wife Joyeuse, his sons Lame Lothar Frey and Black Walder Rivers, his daughter Roslin Tully, and his granddaughter Fat Walda Bolton.

to:

* MassiveNumberedSiblings: The GOT Wiki has listed roughly ''twenty'' named descendants who have been name-dropped or identified within the show at this point. This is barely even scratching the surface of the family from the ''books'' - -- and on top of ''that'', there seem to be a few CanonForeigner descendants added to the show, as listed below. The TV show did mercifully condense this down to about six major recurring characters: Walder Frey, his young wife Joyeuse, his sons Lame Lothar Frey and Black Walder Rivers, his daughter Roslin Tully, and his granddaughter Fat Walda Bolton.



** Claims to value family above all else, but can't even remember the names of many of his literally dozens of direct descendants. Also considers his wives expendable and keeps getting young nubile ones.[[labelnote:From the Books...]]...Several characters do point out that Walder does hold to this principle somewhat - in the sense that he would never murder one of his own children, even if they are incompetent and removing them would allow a competent younger sibling to replace their position. The same cannot be said of the other Freys, and more than one character has pointed out that when old Walder finally dies there's probably going to be a bloodbath between his literally dozens of rival heirs. On the other hand, he has no problem when ''other people'' kill his children and grandchildren, considering them replaceable and dispensable. In the books, it wasn't his wife who Catelyn killed, but a lackwit grandson Jinglebell Frey - he refused her offer to exchange his life for Robb's by noting that he has plenty of grandsons, and a mentally handicapped one was never of much use.[[/labelnote]]

to:

** Claims to value family above all else, but can't even remember the names of many of his literally dozens of direct descendants. Also considers his wives expendable and keeps getting young nubile ones.[[labelnote:From the Books...]]...Several characters do point out that Walder does hold to this principle somewhat - -- in the sense that he would never murder one of his own children, even if they are incompetent and removing them would allow a competent younger sibling to replace their position. The same cannot be said of the other Freys, and more than one character has pointed out that when old Walder finally dies there's probably going to be a bloodbath between his literally dozens of rival heirs. On the other hand, he has no problem when ''other people'' kill his children and grandchildren, considering them replaceable and dispensable. In the books, it wasn't his wife who Catelyn killed, but a lackwit grandson Jinglebell Frey - -- he refused her offer to exchange his life for Robb's by noting that he has plenty of grandsons, and a mentally handicapped one was never of much use.[[/labelnote]]



* IAteWhat: In the season six finale, [[spoiler:Arya feeds him a last meal consisting of a meat pie made out of his own sons and helpfully informs him of what (who) he just ate before slashing his throat. This form of payback is in reference to "The Rat Cook", a story Bran told in the episode following the Red Wedding, which involved a cook who murdered a prince, baked him into a pie, and fed him to the boy's unknowing father. The gods punished him by turning him into a monstrous rat who could only eat his own offspring. The reason they cursed him? Because he violated [[SacredHospitality Guest Right.]]]]

to:

* IAteWhat: In the season six Season 6 finale, [[spoiler:Arya feeds him a last meal consisting of a meat pie made out of his own sons and helpfully informs him of what (who) he just ate before slashing his throat. This form of payback is in reference to "The Rat Cook", a story Bran told in the episode following the Red Wedding, which involved a cook who murdered a prince, baked him into a pie, and fed him to the boy's unknowing father. The gods punished him by turning him into a monstrous rat who could only eat his own offspring. The reason they cursed him? Because he violated [[SacredHospitality Guest Right.]]]]



* OldManMarryingAChild: His new wife is a fifteen year-old girl. Season Six's "Blood of my Blood" reveals he's found another.

to:

* OldManMarryingAChild: His new wife is a fifteen year-old girl. Season Six's 6's "Blood of my Blood" reveals he's found another.



* WhosLaughingNow: In the season three finale "Mhysa", he describes the Red Wedding as a payback for all the times the Starks and Tullys have looked down upon him or insulted him. In a minor bout of karmic payback, when he reappears in "Blood of my Blood", he's throwing a tantrum for Lame Lothar and Black Walder Rivers' [[spoiler:inability to find the Blackfish after the Red Wedding or prevent him from retaking Riverrun]], since now he believes everyone is still laughing at him.

to:

* WhosLaughingNow: In the season three Season 3 finale "Mhysa", he describes the Red Wedding as a payback for all the times the Starks and Tullys have looked down upon him or insulted him. In a minor bout of karmic payback, when he reappears in "Blood of my Blood", he's throwing a tantrum for Lame Lothar and Black Walder Rivers' [[spoiler:inability to find the Blackfish after the Red Wedding or prevent him from retaking Riverrun]], since now he believes everyone is still laughing at him.



* TokenGoodTeammate: Of all the Freys, he doesn't seem to be as bad as his kin - at least, from those in the Red Wedding, and we haven't seen enough of the females besides Roslin to tell what they are like.[[labelnote:From the books...]]Three other Frey males - Perwyn and Olyvar, two full brothers from his sixth wife, the latter Robb's squire who gets a brief mention in the show; and a grandson named Alesander - are confirmed to also be this: they were all sent away before the Red Wedding due to being considered "too sympathetic" to the Northerners, and may not even have known of the plot until it was too late [[/labelnote]]

to:

* TokenGoodTeammate: Of all the Freys, he doesn't seem to be as bad as his kin - -- at least, from those in the Red Wedding, and we haven't seen enough of the females besides Roslin to tell what they are like.[[labelnote:From the books...]]Three other Frey males - -- Perwyn and Olyvar, two full brothers from his sixth wife, the latter Robb's squire who gets a brief mention in the show; and a grandson named Alesander - -- are confirmed to also be this: they were all sent away before the Red Wedding due to being considered "too sympathetic" to the Northerners, and may not even have known of the plot until it was too late [[/labelnote]]



* AllThereInTheManual: His name - he was originally believed to be Walder Rivers, but is likely Ryger Rivers instead - hinted by the [[CompositeCharacter combining of said character with Black Walder Frey from the books]], along with his more pleasant demeanour, line of dialogue, and backstory as a milkmaid's son (both of which belong to Ryger in the books).

to:

* AllThereInTheManual: His name - -- he was originally believed to be Walder Rivers, but is likely Ryger Rivers instead - -- hinted by the [[CompositeCharacter combining of said character with Black Walder Frey from the books]], along with his more pleasant demeanour, line of dialogue, and backstory as a milkmaid's son (both of which belong to Ryger in the books).



* CompositeCharacter: There is no Black Walder Rivers in the books - he's a combination of two characters, with elements of a third:

to:

* CompositeCharacter: There is no Black Walder Rivers in the books - -- he's a combination of two characters, with elements of a third:



* AdaptationNameChange: Her name is similar to "Arwyn Frey", the sixth of Lord Walder's trueborn daughters in the books (between Roslin and Shirei); it's possible her name was changed in the show, possibly to add to the ThemeNaming the show has given them (Frey women's names ending on "-a" or "-ya" sounds). On the other hand, the three daughters below (who added to the number he has in the books) suggest she might be an original character rather than the same one - unlike her brother Elmar (the books' equivalent of Waldron, Arya's once-betrothed), Arwyn has no distinguishing traits that highlight her presence, so it's hard to tell if she's meant to be the same character.

to:

* AdaptationNameChange: Her name is similar to "Arwyn Frey", the sixth of Lord Walder's trueborn daughters in the books (between Roslin and Shirei); it's possible her name was changed in the show, possibly to add to the ThemeNaming the show has given them (Frey women's names ending on "-a" or "-ya" sounds). On the other hand, the three daughters below (who added to the number he has in the books) suggest she might be an original character rather than the same one - -- unlike her brother Elmar (the books' equivalent of Waldron, Arya's once-betrothed), Arwyn has no distinguishing traits that highlight her presence, so it's hard to tell if she's meant to be the same character.



* AdaptationNameChange: In the books, Lord Walder has no trueborn daughters with these names - there are Waldas among his bastard daughters, as well as his granddaughters and great-granddaughters, and Waldra is a similarly derivative name, but nobody named Derwa appears in the books or even indices. Of seven trueborn daughters in the books, the eldest three are married and the fourth is a maid of nearly thirty. Based on their relative age, these three appear to have replaced the books' Arwyn Frey - the sixth legitimate daughter of Walder and first child with Anna Farring, Anwyn is a year younger than Roslin and nearly ten years older than her trueborn sister Shirei. Derwa, Waldra and Walda are in the right age range to be between Roslin and Shirei, regardless of whether their mother is intended to be Walder's 6th wife (Bethany Rosby) or his 7th (Anna Farring).

to:

* AdaptationNameChange: In the books, Lord Walder has no trueborn daughters with these names - -- there are Waldas among his bastard daughters, as well as his granddaughters and great-granddaughters, and Waldra is a similarly derivative name, but nobody named Derwa appears in the books or even indices. Of seven trueborn daughters in the books, the eldest three are married and the fourth is a maid of nearly thirty. Based on their relative age, these three appear to have replaced the books' Arwyn Frey - -- the sixth legitimate daughter of Walder and first child with Anna Farring, Anwyn is a year younger than Roslin and nearly ten years older than her trueborn sister Shirei. Derwa, Waldra and Walda are in the right age range to be between Roslin and Shirei, regardless of whether their mother is intended to be Walder's 6th wife (Bethany Rosby) or his 7th (Anna Farring).



* TwinThreesomeFantasy: Invoked when Lord Walder claims he'd have not minded if Robb - had he kept his vow - chose ''both'' of them as opposed to picking between themto be his bride. Should be taken with a grain of salt given his duplicity.

to:

* TwinThreesomeFantasy: Invoked when Lord Walder claims he'd have not minded if Robb - -- had he kept his vow - -- chose ''both'' of them as opposed to picking between themto them to be his bride. Should be taken with a grain of salt given his duplicity.



* AdaptationDistillation: She's based on Marianne ''Vance'' from the books, who was Lord Walder's ''great''-granddaughter - her mother, Maegelle Frey, was married to Ser Dafyn Vance and was the daughter of Stevron Frey and his second wife. Her backstory seems to have been simplified, either by the writers for the audience, or otherwise by Lord Walder to avoid him explaining it in great detail. Her book counterpart was also presented to Robb despite being born a Vance, not a Frey.

to:

* AdaptationDistillation: She's based on Marianne ''Vance'' from the books, who was Lord Walder's ''great''-granddaughter - -- her mother, Maegelle Frey, was married to Ser Dafyn Vance and was the daughter of Stevron Frey and his second wife. Her backstory seems to have been simplified, either by the writers for the audience, or otherwise by Lord Walder to avoid him explaining it in great detail. Her book counterpart was also presented to Robb despite being born a Vance, not a Frey.



* PetTheDog: Receives a subtle one from her grandfather, who lets her sit at the main table next to his wife during the wedding - she's the only descendant of his besides Roslin that gets this honour.

to:

* PetTheDog: Receives a subtle one from her grandfather, who lets her sit at the main table next to his wife during the wedding - -- she's the only descendant of his besides Roslin that gets this honour.



* CanonForeigner: As revealed in the ''Literature/TalesOfDunkAndEgg'' prequel novellas, Lord Walder has only one sibling with any detailed backstory - a sister, roughly a dozen years older than him and the second wife of Lord Ambrose of House Butterwell (a house which is disgraced during the events of the novella series, and thus may or may not exist in the present). Besides her, their father had at least two other daughters; any other relations outside of Walder's own line of ancestry have yet to be mentioned.

to:

* CanonForeigner: As revealed in the ''Literature/TalesOfDunkAndEgg'' prequel novellas, Lord Walder has only one sibling with any detailed backstory - -- a sister, roughly a dozen years older than him and the second wife of Lord Ambrose of House Butterwell (a house which is disgraced during the events of the novella series, and thus may or may not exist in the present). Besides her, their father had at least two other daughters; any other relations outside of Walder's own line of ancestry have yet to be mentioned.



* OnlyOneName: Subverted, but we don't know if her surname is Frey or something else - besides the aforementioned sisters of Lord Walder the prequel novels mentioned, the TV show is already an AlternateContinuity in its own right.

to:

* OnlyOneName: Subverted, but we don't know if her surname is Frey or something else - -- besides the aforementioned sisters of Lord Walder the prequel novels mentioned, the TV show is already an AlternateContinuity in its own right.



* AgeLift: In the books, Willem is the second son of Cleos Frey, himself the eldest son of Emmon Frey - Lord Walder's second-born child and son, who is married to Genna Lannister, Tywin's younger sister. This ''might'' be him, aged up to correspond with the setting: in the books, Genna Lannister starts off at 52, her brother Tywin at about 55 or 56. With Tywin's age in Season 4 being stated as 67 (presumably 64 in the first season), it stands to reason that Genna herself would be in her early 60s ''at least'' when the story begins and thus old enough to have adult grandchildren.

to:

* AgeLift: In the books, Willem is the second son of Cleos Frey, himself the eldest son of Emmon Frey - -- Lord Walder's second-born child and son, who is married to Genna Lannister, Tywin's younger sister. This ''might'' be him, aged up to correspond with the setting: in the books, Genna Lannister starts off at 52, her brother Tywin at about 55 or 56. With Tywin's age in Season 4 being stated as 67 (presumably 64 in the first season), it stands to reason that Genna herself would be in her early 60s ''at least'' when the story begins and thus old enough to have adult grandchildren.



* MythologyGag: Given the above tropes about him, there's the fact that he's mentioned by Alton Lannister, who was created as a CanonForeigner substitute for the role that Cleos Frey - father of the books' Willem Frey - had in the books.

to:

* MythologyGag: Given the above tropes about him, there's the fact that he's mentioned by Alton Lannister, who was created as a CanonForeigner substitute for the role that Cleos Frey - -- father of the books' Willem Frey - -- had in the books.
16th Mar '17 1:47:46 PM TywinIsGod
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* VillainousBreakdown: Loses his temper at his two Co-Dragons when the Blackfish takes back Riverrun in Season 6.
This list shows the last 10 events of 187. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Characters.GameOfThronesHouseFrey