History CerebusSyndrome / Literature

23rd Nov '16 4:19:57 PM ShorinBJ
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* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.

to:

* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but bit of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's [=LoTF=]'s cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.
3rd Nov '16 9:56:32 PM nombretomado
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* ''Flinx in Flux'' marks the transition of the ''HumanxCommonwealth'' series from a light-hearted and mainly episodic SpaceOpera to a battle for the fate of the entire galaxy when it introduces the [[UltimateEvil Great Evil]]. It also marks Flinx's transition to full maturity by introducing his ongoing LoveInterest, Clarity Held.

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* ''Flinx in Flux'' marks the transition of the ''HumanxCommonwealth'' ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series from a light-hearted and mainly episodic SpaceOpera to a battle for the fate of the entire galaxy when it introduces the [[UltimateEvil Great Evil]]. It also marks Flinx's transition to full maturity by introducing his ongoing LoveInterest, Clarity Held.
23rd Mar '16 8:12:09 AM JustCause
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* Lemony Snicket's ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. And it was dark enough when it started, too.

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* Lemony Snicket's ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. And While it was dark enough always dark, it sort of edged into over-the-top black comedy and Baudelaires always managed to escape Count Olaf in a PyrrhicVictory. The Vile Village is generally viewed as the turning point, when it started, too.the Baudelaires are accused of for murdering Olaf and the Escape-From-Olaf plot was eclipsed by the larger MythArc
11th Dec '15 1:05:55 PM BackwardThgindiM
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** The sequel series, ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'', is perhaps a better example. The series begins with a relatively lighthearted mystery about a missing statue. By the end, it involves [[spoiler:murder, serial kidnapping, {{Child Abuse}}, and even a good, old fashioned {{Eldritch Abomination}}.]]

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** The sequel series, ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'', is perhaps a better example. The series begins with a relatively lighthearted mystery about a missing statue. By the end, it involves [[spoiler:murder, serial kidnapping, {{Child Abuse}}, child abuse, and even a good, old fashioned {{Eldritch Abomination}}.]]
11th Dec '15 1:04:46 PM BackwardThgindiM
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Added DiffLines:

** The sequel series, ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'', is perhaps a better example. The series begins with a relatively lighthearted mystery about a missing statue. By the end, it involves [[spoiler:murder, serial kidnapping, {{Child Abuse}}, and even a good, old fashioned {{Eldritch Abomination}}.]]
22nd Oct '15 4:40:48 PM Everdream
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* The ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series is normally very serious, but the third series starts off with one of the [[LighterAndSofter most lighthearted and optimistic books]] in the series, and then gradually became more and more dark until it ended with one of the [[DarkerAndEdgier most dark and depressing books]] in the whole series. Since the third series was mostly character driven, this was likely done to show the Three's loss of innocence and more mature outlook on their responsibilities, much like the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' example above.

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* The ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series is normally very serious, but the third series starts off with one of the [[LighterAndSofter most lighthearted and optimistic books]] in the series, and then gradually became more and more dark until it ended with one of the [[DarkerAndEdgier most dark and depressing books]] in the whole series. Since the third series was mostly character driven, this was likely done to show the Three's loss of innocence and more mature outlook on their responsibilities, much like the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' example above.below.
8th Oct '15 10:55:52 PM nombretomado
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* From Book Three onwards, ''PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' gets steadily darker, with the deaths of major good-guy characters and more mature themes

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* From Book Three onwards, ''PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' gets steadily darker, with the deaths of major good-guy characters and more mature themes
7th Sep '15 11:01:25 AM nombretomado
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* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.

to:

* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The NewJediOrder Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.
28th Aug '15 7:52:49 PM dysphere
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* The GallagherGirls series started out as basically a romantic comedy set inside a spy school, with Cammie Morgan wanting to date an ordinary guy without revealing that she's a spy-in-training, but later books involve a conspiracy involving the Circle of Cavan, who kept trying to kill Cammie and Cammie herself even kills someone. Cammie was even tortured at one point and the Circle of Cavan end up wanting to start World War 3.

to:

* The GallagherGirls Literature/TheGallagherGirls series started out as basically a romantic comedy set inside a spy school, with Cammie Morgan wanting to date an ordinary guy without revealing that she's a spy-in-training, but later books involve a conspiracy involving the Circle of Cavan, who kept trying to kill Cammie and Cammie herself even kills someone. Cammie was even tortured at one point and the Circle of Cavan end up wanting to start World War 3.
28th Aug '15 7:51:22 PM dysphere
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Added DiffLines:

* The GallagherGirls series started out as basically a romantic comedy set inside a spy school, with Cammie Morgan wanting to date an ordinary guy without revealing that she's a spy-in-training, but later books involve a conspiracy involving the Circle of Cavan, who kept trying to kill Cammie and Cammie herself even kills someone. Cammie was even tortured at one point and the Circle of Cavan end up wanting to start World War 3.
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