History CerebusSyndrome / Literature

9th Jan '18 3:02:49 AM Cryoclaste
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* P.N. Elrod's ''[[TheVampireFiles Vampire Files]]'' series started out as a subversion of vampire wangst, in which Jack Fleming's undead state was treated more like a superhero's abilities and weaknesses than like an occult curse. Basically, he was a detective who could turn invisible and walk through walls, the sort who'd literally use his powers to play pranks on gangsters. But things changed as the villains got nastier: Jack was tortured, his HorrorHunger intensified, his mortal best friend's horrific past was revealed, and the erstwhile subversion of Wangst was nearly DrivenToSuicide. While the latest book suggests Elrod has reversed course, pulling Fleming back from the brink, for a while there things had gotten so grim that ''Lifeblood'', the second book in which Jack argues in defense of his VegetarianVampire nature, had almost become an in-universe FunnyAneurysmMoment.

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* P.N. Elrod's ''[[TheVampireFiles ''[[Literature/TheVampireFiles Vampire Files]]'' series started out as a subversion of vampire wangst, in which Jack Fleming's undead state was treated more like a superhero's abilities and weaknesses than like an occult curse. Basically, he was a detective who could turn invisible and walk through walls, the sort who'd literally use his powers to play pranks on gangsters. But things changed as the villains got nastier: Jack was tortured, his HorrorHunger intensified, his mortal best friend's horrific past was revealed, and the erstwhile subversion of Wangst was nearly DrivenToSuicide. While the latest book suggests Elrod has reversed course, pulling Fleming back from the brink, for a while there things had gotten so grim that ''Lifeblood'', the second book in which Jack argues in defense of his VegetarianVampire nature, had almost become an in-universe FunnyAneurysmMoment.
26th Dec '17 5:15:40 PM nombretomado
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* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little bit of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of [=LoTF=]'s cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.

to:

* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little bit of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of [=LoTF=]'s cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.
23rd Dec '17 7:45:36 PM nombretomado
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* To a certain extent, ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series by Creator/DouglasAdams uses this trope with ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'', written around the time Adams suffered some [[CreatorBreakdown private personal difficulties]] that led to him writing an incredibly depressing ending to the series in which [[KillThemAll almost all the characters die]] and Earth is destroyed in every single possible timeline. He wanted to write a sixth book to counter the CerebusSyndrome but his infamous AuthorExistenceFailure stopped him. EoinColfer wrote ''Literature/AndAnotherThing'', but everyone is certain it will never match Adams' own unwritten sixth ''Hitchhiker's'' book.

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* To a certain extent, ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series by Creator/DouglasAdams uses this trope with ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'', written around the time Adams suffered some [[CreatorBreakdown private personal difficulties]] that led to him writing an incredibly depressing ending to the series in which [[KillThemAll almost all the characters die]] and Earth is destroyed in every single possible timeline. He wanted to write a sixth book to counter the CerebusSyndrome but his infamous AuthorExistenceFailure stopped him. EoinColfer Creator/EoinColfer wrote ''Literature/AndAnotherThing'', but everyone is certain it will never match Adams' own unwritten sixth ''Hitchhiker's'' book.
13th Sep '17 7:29:20 PM nombretomado
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* Pierre Beaumarchais' ''Figaro'' trilogy. ''TheBarberOfSeville'' is a farce. ''Theatre/TheMarriageOfFigaro'' delves into class issues, culminating into a lengthy monologue delivered by Figaro. Then there's ''TheGuiltyMother,'' which is a more serious play along the lines of ''Theatre/{{Tartuffe}}'' (the play itself was subtitled "The Other Tartuffe").

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* Pierre Beaumarchais' ''Figaro'' trilogy. ''TheBarberOfSeville'' ''Theatre/TheBarberOfSeville'' is a farce. ''Theatre/TheMarriageOfFigaro'' delves into class issues, culminating into a lengthy monologue delivered by Figaro. Then there's ''TheGuiltyMother,'' which is a more serious play along the lines of ''Theatre/{{Tartuffe}}'' (the play itself was subtitled "The Other Tartuffe").
6th May '17 4:23:35 PM Kakai
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheSpiritThief'' starts as a series about wacky hijinks of a GentlemanThief, a MasterSwordsman and a demon girl, as well as the InspectorJavert wizard chasing after them, but grows steadily more serious as the main trio's DarkAndTroubledPast is exposed, then jumps headlong into WarIsHell and wraps things up with a CosmicHorrorReveal.
8th Apr '17 1:09:10 PM nombretomado
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* {{Redwall}} was a novel about a heroic mouse saving his Abbey home from an army of rats. While the later books never changed in level of violence. They did create the standard setting, which wasn't present in the first few books. That the entire world is trapped in an endless war between two factions, and you can't even step outside without risk of getting slaughtered by bandits. As well as later books made the heroes attitude towards this more serious. As the earlier books, the mice and other animals depicted as good, would always try to make peace with the rats and other evil creatures and would even attempt to give them sanctuary, heal them, or even mercy save. Even giving main villains chances to leave and try to change their ways" (They never do), in later books the heroes will kill their enemies without question because "They are evil incarnate, as long as they live they will hurt others, so they should all die"

to:

* {{Redwall}} ''{{Literature/Redwall}}'' was a novel about a heroic mouse saving his Abbey home from an army of rats. While the later books never changed in level of violence. They did create the standard setting, which wasn't present in the first few books. That the entire world is trapped in an endless war between two factions, and you can't even step outside without risk of getting slaughtered by bandits. As well as later books made the heroes attitude towards this more serious. As the earlier books, the mice and other animals depicted as good, would always try to make peace with the rats and other evil creatures and would even attempt to give them sanctuary, heal them, or even mercy save. Even giving main villains chances to leave and try to change their ways" (They never do), in later books the heroes will kill their enemies without question because "They are evil incarnate, as long as they live they will hurt others, so they should all die"
23rd Nov '16 4:19:57 PM ShorinBJ
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* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.

to:

* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is very much guilty of this. In general, the Thrawn books and early EU are about on the same level of darkness as the original movies (maybe ''slightly'' more serious and adult, but not much so). There's darkness, but in a clean and epic way, and most of the mains survive the experience. Each of the three big series that follows chronologically, however, plays ''very'' dark in different ways. The Literature/NewJediOrder uses the same ''kind'' of darkness (heroes struggling against a seemingly invincible evil) upped to eleven, [[DarkerAndEdgier featuring casual genocides, an entire species of sadomasochists, graphic torture, and relatively high gore, as opposed to "just" Space Nazis, offscreen torture, and mostly "clean" violence.]] It does, however, end on a fairly optimistic note, with a positive outlook towards the future. ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' backs off a bit on the violence but took a dive towards the cynical end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism that undercut the previous series' ending. It's also not devoid of its own issues: a startling lack of any true attempt to redeem the villain, a lot of dark retcons, and even a little but bit of underage molestation. ''FateOfTheJedi'' isn't nearly as cynical (though it still suffers from the aftershocks of LoTF's [=LoTF=]'s cynicism), but the new BigBad is an ''EldritchAbomination'' who can be defeated temporarily but never completely destroyed all while having the Jedi Order become the most fractured and militaristic it's ever been.
3rd Nov '16 9:56:32 PM nombretomado
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* ''Flinx in Flux'' marks the transition of the ''HumanxCommonwealth'' series from a light-hearted and mainly episodic SpaceOpera to a battle for the fate of the entire galaxy when it introduces the [[UltimateEvil Great Evil]]. It also marks Flinx's transition to full maturity by introducing his ongoing LoveInterest, Clarity Held.

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* ''Flinx in Flux'' marks the transition of the ''HumanxCommonwealth'' ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series from a light-hearted and mainly episodic SpaceOpera to a battle for the fate of the entire galaxy when it introduces the [[UltimateEvil Great Evil]]. It also marks Flinx's transition to full maturity by introducing his ongoing LoveInterest, Clarity Held.
23rd Mar '16 8:12:09 AM JustCause
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* Lemony Snicket's ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. And it was dark enough when it started, too.

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* Lemony Snicket's ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. And While it was dark enough always dark, it sort of edged into over-the-top black comedy and Baudelaires always managed to escape Count Olaf in a PyrrhicVictory. The Vile Village is generally viewed as the turning point, when it started, too.the Baudelaires are accused of for murdering Olaf and the Escape-From-Olaf plot was eclipsed by the larger MythArc
11th Dec '15 1:05:55 PM BackwardThgindiM
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** The sequel series, ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'', is perhaps a better example. The series begins with a relatively lighthearted mystery about a missing statue. By the end, it involves [[spoiler:murder, serial kidnapping, {{Child Abuse}}, and even a good, old fashioned {{Eldritch Abomination}}.]]

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** The sequel series, ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'', is perhaps a better example. The series begins with a relatively lighthearted mystery about a missing statue. By the end, it involves [[spoiler:murder, serial kidnapping, {{Child Abuse}}, child abuse, and even a good, old fashioned {{Eldritch Abomination}}.]]
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